santiago dr gargoyle over city
Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic

Liberal Arts

Study Program

Dates

-

16 weeks

Costs

Credit

15 - 18 semester hours

22.5 - 27 quarter hours

Eligibility

Application Deadline

Apply Now

Request Information

Contact Us

Dates

TBD

Credit

15 - 18 semester hours

22.5 - 27 quarter hours

Eligibility

Application Deadline

Apply Now

Request Information

Contact Us

Dates

-

15 weeks

Costs

Credit

15 - 18 semester hours

22.5 - 27 quarter hours

Eligibility

Application Deadline

The application deadline has passed.

Apply Now

Request Information

Contact Us

Tentative Dates

-

14 weeks

Credit

15 - 18 semester hours

22.5 - 27 quarter hours

Eligibility

Application Deadline

Apply Now

Request Information

Contact Us

Overview

Elevate your Spanish language skills to new heights and learn about the development of the society, culture, business, economics, and politics of the island of Hispaniola while living in one of the most vibrant countries' economies in Latin America: The Dominican Republic. Courses taught by CIEE Santiago and by Pontificia Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra (PUCMM) are complemented with cultural activities coordinated by CIEE to enhance classroom learning and develop intercultural understanding. Students will be in the central valley of El Cibao in the northeastern part of the island, in Santiago de los Caballeros (the Heartland City), which is the second-largest city in the country, surrounded by beautiful mountainous scenery, and garnished with a glimpse of authentic Dominican culture. As CIEE Santiago DR is centrally located on the island, it is a suitable place from which to explore the country and surrounding towns renowned for their centuries-old history. For those interested in a dynamic mid-size city life full of culture and warm hospitality, while studying abroad, Santiago DR Liberal Arts Program is a great opportunity!

Unique Experiences

Discover an enchanted culture

where you’ll enjoy the warmth and tradition of the Dominican people.

Enjoy tasty cuisine

from hearty meals at your homestay to savory street food, to one of the many restaurants and cafes that offer a variety of delicious local and international cuisine recipes.

Get captivated by the local lifestyle

by meeting warm and welcoming Dominicans and exploring the “Heart City.”

11%

major league baseball players who are Dominican

1,000

miles of tropical paradisiac coastline in the country

10,161 FT

Highest peak of the Caribbean, Pico Duarte

Experience
  • santiago dr large student group in street
  • santiago dr beach pink sunset

Your Destination

Find yourself surrounded by mountains in the lush valley of the Cibao region in the center of the island of Hispaniola. Here lies Santiago De Los Caballeros, the second largest city in the Dominican Republic, which puts you steps away from places of historical, cultural, and ecological interest – not to mention about an hour’s drive to the Atlantic Coast with crystal-clear warm water and white sand. Santiago is the commercial and cultural center of the fertile Cibao Valley region, housing the León Jimenez cultural center and the commercial street of Calle del Sol.  

Founded in 1495 by 30 caballeros from Columbus’ early expeditions, Santiago boasts a fascinating history, exciting museums, and endless cultural experiences, including music, art, and festivals. This growing, modern city is home to more than 800,000 people and many Dominican specialties, such as cigars, rum, chocolate, coffee, amber, and larimar. Despite its sprawling size, Santiago retains many small-town features. Traditional merchants call out their wares in a musical chant, and street vendors balance large baskets of fruit and vegetables on their heads.  

Close to the Atlantic Ocean to the north and the Caribbean Sea to the South, Santiago offers endless sports options, including baseball, kitesurfing, and golf, along with ample cultural and artistic entertainment and recreation. Here you can dance to the contagious rhythm of merengue and bachata and enjoy the best Dominican gastronomy.

Come and enjoy a vibrant and growing city in the Caribbean with everything the tropics offer, from some of the most beautiful beaches in the world to the highest peak of the Caribbean. 

The Culture

santiago dr carnival mask

Excursions & Activities

While participating in the liberal arts program, you have a chance to visit:

  • Samana Bay, home to an isolated community of about 200 freemen (or escaped enslaved) from Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Kentucky in 1824; today known as Samaná Americans. 
  • Los Haitises National Park, a set of small mountains in the middle of the sea that serves as a home to many flora and fauna species. 
  • ‘El Limón’ waterfall, a 40-meter waterfall that ends in a wide natural pool with crystal clear blue water, surrounded by trees and bushes. You can get there by hiking or on horseback. 
  • Colonial Zone of Santo Domingo, where you can immerse yourself in the most culturally and historically packed city while enjoying a sunny walk on cobblestone paved streets and artistic performances on the streets.
  • The border with Haiti to learn about commercial trading that takes place in markets between the D.R. and Haiti. During this trip, you will come to appreciate the work organizations do to create a better environment between the two countries.
santiago dr student pushing dirt

Projects

  • Integrate cultural and language mastery in a community-based and cross-cultural context. 
  • Although the program does not directly include volunteer or internship experiences, students have the opportunity to collaborate with animal shelters and work with low-income communities through local NGOs that focus on health, education, and overall well-being, among other possible options (not for credit).  
  • Participate in bachata, salsa, and merengue dance class. Learn how to dance the main musical rhythms that Dominicans love to dance at parties and even on the streets. 
  • Collaborate with Local Student Connections: PUCCM's Office of Student Mobility.  

Program Blogs

From CIEE

Why YOU should come to Santiago? By Ada I. Rios

By CIEE Santiago de los Caballeros at CIEE

It’s officially about a month until the semester is over. During my time studying in Santiago, I’ve verified that I prefer the heat to the cold. Sometimes on my way... keep reading

From CIEE

Tour de las ballenas en Samaná by Eliana Olivier

By CIEE Santiago de los Caballeros at CIEE

Our overnight trip as part of the CIEE Liberal Arts program consisted of a trip to Samaná. We were able to take advantage of the long weekend due to the... keep reading

From CIEE

Day trip to Puerto Plata by Allejandra Spear

By CIEE Santiago de los Caballeros at CIEE

After the first three weeks full of exploring and adjusting to the environment and school, we ended the month with a day trip to a nearby city, Puerto plata. It... keep reading

Housing
Academics

Academics

This program launched in 1987 as a unique opportunity to help students with advanced Spanish skills further their proficiency and explore life in the Dominican Republic during one complete academic term. Along with Spanish language classes, students learn about the evolution of society, culture, economics, and politics of the island of Hispaniola (shared by the Dominican Republic and Haiti) and the greater Hispanic Caribbean through liberal arts courses at CIEE and Pontificia Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra (PUCMM). Results from a Spanish language proficiency exam at the beginning of the program place students into one of three Spanish language levels and determine which required language courses and electives they may take. Students in the two most-advanced levels may take a selection of direct enroll classes at PUCMM (pre-requisites apply).  

All students sign off on the CIEE Community Language Commitment, agreeing to speak only Spanish, in order to foster language proficiency and understanding of Dominican society from a cultural/competent perspective. The coursework is integrated into and complemented by relevant cultural activities, two all-day field trips, and one overnight stay, all these co-curricular experiences provide real-life context to the teaching and learning process of the study abroad. In addition, students could register for CIEE Directed Independent Research on one topic of interest that is suitable to develop in the Dominican Republic.

Pontificia Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra (PUCMM) was founded in 1962 and is dedicated to serving the social and economic development of all Dominicans and has been ranked for about 60 years as the best academic institution of higher learning in the Dominican Republic. PUCMM is one of the first universities in the Dominican Republic to enter the prestigious QS World Ranking 2023, standing out for having the best alumni employability rates. It continues to be in first place in the Dominican Republic Webometrics Ranking from 2020 to 2022. Also, this institution is a leader in the offer of online master's degrees nationwide. Conveniently located just a 15-minute drive from downtown Santiago, PUCMM's nature-inspired campus offers academic degrees from four academic colleges: Social Sciences and Administration; Science and Humanities; Engineering Sciences; and Health Sciences.

CIEE Santiago is conveniently located on the PUCMM campus. 

GPA

2.5

Language Requirements

At least four semesters of college-level Spanish (or equivalent) 

Additional Requirements

Please refer to the detailed Program Essential Eligibility Criteria.

Individual courses may have additional prerequisites; for CIEE courses, these are listed in the syllabi below. Students are responsible for having their own course approval conversations with their advisors.

Requirements

  • One Advanced Spanish Language course at PUCMM 
  • At least two elective courses (for a total of 15 to 18 total semester credits) from CIEE, PUCMM Spanish Course for Foreigners and/or PUCMM Regular University courses. 

Program Credit

Credit: 15-18 semester/22.5-27 quarter credits 

Course Credit

  • CIEE Directed Independent Research: 3 semester/4.5 quarter credits; 15 seminar hours, 100-120 research hours 
  • PUCMM courses: 1-6 semester/1.5-9 quarter credits; 15-90 contact hours 

Individual courses may have additional prerequisites; for CIEE courses, these are listed in the syllabi below. Students are responsible for having their own course approval conversations with their advisors.

Academic Culture

Most PUCMM students specialize in a profession such as law, medicine, engineering, architecture, education, or business. However, there is a variety of Social Sciences Majors being offered at PUCMM, such as Psychology, Social Communication, and Social Work, among others. Although PUCMM is the country’s premier private university, U.S. students may find interesting differences between teaching goals and methods at PUCMM and their home schools. However, in the last decade, competency-based education has been evident in most academic programs, which promote more interactive and participatory methods that may include a variety of activities such as tutorials, readings, discussions, reports, and tests. In some cases, strategies may include presentations about specific topics researched by the students, both individually and collaboratively, which requires them to take more initiative in learning. The teaching and learning modality allows students to advance critical thinking and reflective learning. 

Class Format

Advanced Spanish language and CIEE courses are open to CIEE students only. Electives through PUCMM’s division of Spanish for Foreigners are open to (up to five) other international or Dominican students. Other PUCMM courses are also open to Dominicans and other foreign students. Professors are from the Pontificia Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra or contracted by the Department of Spanish for Foreigners. Specific class formats will vary according to the field of knowledge and will be clearly explained in the syllabus for each course.  

Grading

In CIEE and PUCMM courses, students are graded from A-F on quizzes, exams, papers, presentations, and class participation. Students are encouraged to communicate well with the faculty about assignments, deadlines, and evaluations. Attendance is mandatory. Incompletes are not accepted. 

Individual courses may have additional prerequisites; for CIEE courses, these are listed in the syllabi below. Students are responsible for having their own course approval conversations with their advisors.

Language of Instruction

English and Spanish

Individual courses may have additional prerequisites; for CIEE courses, these are listed in the syllabi below. Students are responsible for having their own course approval conversations with their advisors.

Courses

Course Information

Academic Projects

Course
Language
Semester Credit

Communication, Journalism, and Media

Course
Language
Semester Credit

Academic Projects

Course
Language
Semester Credit

Communication, Journalism, and Media

Course
Language
Semester Credit

PUCMM ADVANCED SPANISH LANGUAGE COURSES

Advanced Spanish I (6 credits) 
Advanced Spanish II (4 credits) 
Advanced Spanish III (4 credits)

PUCMM ELECTIVE COURSES: DEPARTMENT OF SPANISH FOR FOREIGNERS

These classes are offered for foreigners by PUCMM staff, although up to five Dominican and/or international students per class may also enroll, space permitting. Courses are not always offered each semester and a minimum enrollment of six students is needed to run each class.

FOR STUDENTS AT ADVANCED SPANISH LEVEL I, II, OR III

Caribbean Short Stories 
This course offers a panorama of Spanish Caribbean literature in Spanish from the colonial era through the present, with an emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Course content is developed through lectures, readings, discussion, and analysis of representative works of each period from Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. (3 credits)

Introduction to Dominican Folklore 
This class presents a complete and systematic panorama of the different aspects and branches of folklore, with rich Dominican examples so that students can understand easily and appreciate the cultural context into which they are immersed. Examples include verbal folklore (spoken, proverbs, poetry, legends, stories, songs); partially spoken (superstitions, magic, children’s games); nonverbal (gestures, costumes, food); and field work methodology. (3 credits)

Latin American Cinema and Society 
As the “Civilization of the Imagination,” cinema is recognized as one of the most effective mediums for the diffusion of human ideas and for understanding the reality of the world’s peoples. Furthermore, it is an excellent vehicle to inform us about the social, political, and cultural reality, in both the past and the present, of the countries that produce films. This course serves to deepen students’ knowledge about this region of the world. Parallel to the concepts mentioned above, theoretical cinematographic concepts will be presented and a compendium of the history of this “seventh art form.” (3 credits)

Teacher Training Methodology Course and Directed Teaching 
This course trains students in teaching English as a second language, giving an overview of recent theories of second-language acquisition and teaching methodologies, practical application, and theoretical principles through class presentations and student teaching. Credit is granted for the course in conjunction with teaching (but not for teaching alone). There is also a requirement for a final paper that combines knowledge learned in the classroom with experience gained in the directed teaching segment. (Please note that although each student who successfully completes this course receives a TESL certificate, the certificate does not fulfill U.S. or foreign requirements for teaching English as a second language. This course is taught in English and is offered on a for-credit basis only with home institution study abroad advisor approval. It requires 28 contact hours of theory and 56 of practicum). (4 credits)  

FOR STUDENTS AT ADVANCED SPANISH LEVEL II OR III

Special Intermediate Conversation 
This course is intensive (12 hours per week of class for four weeks) and seeks to develop Spanish communication, above all at the oral level, and to improve the students’ Spanish pronunciation, widen their vocabulary, and teach them some aspects of Dominican culture.  In order to accomplish this, they will be taught some basic theoretical principles, will participate in a series of communicative activities, and will discuss a series of pre-selected thematic readings.  In the classroom, they will take part in presentations, oral readings, and pronunciation, hearing, and comprehension exercises, among others.  Students must already have a solid grasp of basic grammatical structures in Spanish. (3 credits)

Poverty and Development: Dominican Case Study 
In this course, the concepts of poverty and development are studied through an analysis of national and international factors that deepen poverty and impede a country´s and/or a region´s progress and socio-economic development. Special emphasis is placed on the socio-cultural contexts of the Dominican Republic, the Caribbean, and Latin America.  The focus is on neoliberal economic policies, statistics related to international financial organizations, strategies and alternatives for socio-economic and human development in Latin American and Caribbean societies, and external debt and its impact on the poorest countries in the region.  (3 credits)

Community Service Practicum 
Designed for students interested in development or social work, the course seeks to identify the causes of problems in the areas of education, health, and neighborhood-level social service, as well as give students an understanding of the Dominican reality. Complementing the academic coursework is a minimum of four hours of weekly volunteer work in a social service activity in Santiago. There is also a requirement for a final paper that combines knowledge learned in the classroom with experience gained in the volunteer practicum. At the end of the semester, students give a public presentation of their community service experience. It requires  28-theory and  56-practicum contact hours. (3 credits)

Culture and Society of the Hispanic Caribbean 
This class examines the parallel and contrasting cultural characteristics of the Hispanic Caribbean through analysis of the different ways in which Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic developed. Students study the history and society of each island, focusing on their intellectual movements, political thought, and artistic and literary movements. (3 credits)

Afro-Caribbean Cultures 
This course looks at the diversity, uniqueness, and unity of the African experience across the Caribbean. The goal of the course is to help students understand the historical roots and social processes of Afro- Caribbean heritage in society, politics, the arts, and various other cultural aspects, including Afro-Caribbean religious beliefs and practices. (3 credits)

Contemporary Dominican Literature 
Dominican literature of the 20th and 21st centuries is surveyed with an emphasis on developments since the advent of Modernism. Topics include the influence of race, geography, and politics; and the effects of 20th and 21st century “Dominican reality” on literary trends. Students gain an understanding of and appreciation for the imagination, esthetic literary values, and spiritual expressions of this country’s contemporary authors of short stories, poetry, and novels. (3 credits)

Contemporary Latin American Literature 
This course provides a survey of modern Latin American literature from 20th century Modernism through the Latin American boom in post-Modernism. Students read and analyze some of Latin America’s most renowned authors of poetry, short stories, essays, and novels. (3 credits)

Dominican-Haitian Relations 
This course examines the realities of the contemporary Republic of Haiti and the Dominican Republic, with a review of the historical and structural underpinnings that have influenced relations between the countries. The course addresses historical events that define Dominican-Haitian relations, beginning with the colonial period through the Trujillo Era and into the present. (3 credits)

Gender and Society of the Hispanic Caribbean 
The situation of women in the Hispanic Caribbean is analyzed from a human development perspective using comparative analyses in the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. The course examines the variables of health, education, work, politics, and art, starting from the level of development of the individual Hispanic Caribbean countries. Student participation requires extensive field work in Santiago and other sites around the Dominican Republic. (3 credits)

History of the Caribbean 
Caribbean history from the colonial period to the present is surveyed in this course, with an emphasis on the Spanish Caribbean. Topics include conquest and colonization, the rise of sugar, the Haitian revolution and the abolition of slavery, independence movements, economic imperialism in the 20th century, the Cuban revolution, and 21st-century globalization. (3 credits)

Latin American Culture and Society 
In an exploratory and introductory manner, students examine the formation and evolution of the various Latin American cultures and societies in the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. The course focuses on the principal historic events and the socio-cultural forces and processes that have impacted their development, provided development potential, or blocked the development of Latin American societies. (3 credits)

Literature of Latin American and Caribbean Women 
This course introduces students to literature written by Latin American and Caribbean women from the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasis is on gender and women’s actual experiences throughout history in terms of their political, social, and cultural circumstances, as well as the discrimination that women have faced in the literary arena. (3 credits)

Panorama of Hispanic American 
This course seeks to help students learn that literature is an evolutionary and dynamic art form that can help them understand the reality of life in a particular Hispanic country at a particular time in history. Students read about and analyze literary movements through the works of the most representative Hispanic American authors from the Conquest Era through present day. (3 credits)

Spanish Caribbean Literature 
Literature of the Spanish-speaking Caribbean is examined from its origins to the present, with emphasis on authors and works of the 19th and 20th centuries. Literary movements such as indigenism and negritude are analyzed through the works of representative Dominican, Cuban, and Puerto Rican authors. (3 credits)

PUCMM REGULAR UNIVERSITY COURSES

Below is a sample offering of the regular PUCMM courses available to CIEE students at Advanced Spanish Level II or III. Not all courses are available every semester and some may require a prerequisite.

Dominican Economics and its Background 
The fundamental characteristics of the Dominican economy and its environment and background are presented in this course. In particular, the course examines the country’s recent history and how this has impacted the principal sectors of its economy. Among the themes to be covered are macroeconomic indicators, sector analyses, political economics, and other themes that have affected the present state of the Dominican economy. (Macroeconomics prerequisite) (3 credits)

General Psychology 
This is a general and scientific view of psychology as a science, and its evolution, methodology, and contemporary currents. The course focuses on the areas of learning, motivation, personality, and behavior. (3 credits)

History of Political and Social Ideas 
This course examines the evolution of political and social ideas from the Ancient East through modern times with a focus on the principal historical events (markers) from which diverse concepts emerged and evolved. The aim of the courses is for students to gain an understanding of these events and their influences in the historical context. (3 credits)

Human Sexuality 
This psychology course introduces human sexuality in an integrated format that encompasses all its multiple facets, both its normal and abnormal aspects, and the relationship between mental health and the exercise of sexuality as an integral element of the personality. Sexuality is seen from a physiological perspective, exploring its links to psychological processes. Throughout, the course takes a critical approach toward the role of psychology as a viable agent for resolving any conflicts in the area of human sexuality. (Biology prerequisite) (3 credits)

Introduction to the Hospitality Industry 
This course is aimed at introducing students to the wide range of distinct businesses and organizations within the tourism sector. Students study the importance of developing both the worldwide and local tourism industries, which encompass hospitality and services that go far beyond providing simple accommodation, transportation, and recreation to tourists and business people. There is a focus on the structure of the hotel and restaurant industries as the most important and most developed components of the tourism industry. (3 credits)

Introduction to International Commerce 
This course introduces students to the operation of the international market (both of products and capital), the stock market and how values are set and maintained, methods of international payment and customs operations, and international agreements, including with their legal aspects and effects upon the world economy. The final unit in the course examines the specific case of the Dominican Republic. (Macroeconomics prerequisite). (3 credits)

Introduction to Philosophy 
Students are introduced to the principles of philosophy and logic and their relationship to religion, mythology, and the natural sciences. (3 credits)

Introduction to Sociology 
This course covers the basic theoretical concepts of the science of sociology, focusing on topics that affect Dominican students’ lives, often without their awareness, such as social conduct and social inequalities caused by economic, racial, ethnic, and gender discrimination. (3 credits)

Photography I 
This course examines photography as a means to capture reality and its relevance as communication. Emphasis is placed upon both documentary and artistic results, including visual composition, the communication of ideas, the documentation of events, and the use of individual creativity to express feelings through photographic works. Each student must have a good quality digital or 35mm camera. (3 credits, including laboratory work).

Rural and Urban Sociology 
Students examine agrarian and urban systems and social organization in the Dominican Republic from a historical perspective. The main topics include rural family organization and habitat, the agrarian economy and social relations, migration, urbanization, and industrialization. (Introduction to Sociology prerequisite). (3 credits)

Christian Anthropology 
This course attempts to explore all that it means to be human: including the origins of humankind; the greatness that is the human body and soul; humankind’s limitations, patterns of thought; and the capacity to relate to others in different societies, to relate to nature, and to relate to God. The aim is to instill in students a clear vision, through readings and discussions, of the role of Christianity in the rediscovery and re-evaluation of the dignity of the human being. (2 credits)

Introduction to the Bible 
This course provides an in-depth introduction to the Bible and its wide variety of versions and modern languages. (2 credits)

Jesus, the Person 
Students examine various documents (including the Old Testament and ancient maps) and study Jewish society and religion at the time of the birth of Jesus. The course aims to introduce students to the events of Jesus’ life and death, his legacy, and, most importantly, to Jesus as a person. (2 credits)

PUCMM ONE-CREDIT COURSES open to all CIEE students.

Arts 
Artistic Drawing, Drama, Fundamentals of Fine Art, Guitar, Introduction to Singing, Modern Dance, Music Appreciation, Oratory, Painting, Photography, Sculpture, Silk-Screening, Theater Performance and design.

Dominican Dance and Folklore 
Dominican folklore is introduced through regional dances and musical instruments. Students learn to dance traditional merengue, bachata, and salsa (may be taken with other international students or with Dominicans).

Physical Education 
Baseball, Basketball, Judo, Karate, Rhythmic Gymnastics, Soccer, Swimming, Table Tennis, Tennis, Track, Volleyball.

Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be canceled due to insufficient enrollment.
"(GI)" denotes courses that originated at CIEE's Global Institutes and that are offered at multiple CIEE sites.

Scholarships

Scholarships & Grants

CIEE offers scholarships and grants annually to help students like you make your study abroad dream a reality.

Students who apply to this program are eligible for the following scholarships and grants:

  • Wollitzer Merit Scholarships in Area or Comparative Studies
  • Ping Scholarships for Academic Excellence
  • Global Access Initiative (GAIN) Grants
  • Stohl International Undergraduate Research Scholarships
  • CIEE Gilman Go Global Grant
  • MSI Grant

To be considered, submit the CIEE Scholarships & Grants application within your CIEE program application.

Learn more about scholarships

Dates & Fees

Dates & Fees

You get more for every dollar when you study abroad with CIEE, because our high-quality programs include everything from excursions to insurance. There are no hidden charges, and no disappointing surprises when you arrive.

Program

Application Due

Start Date

End Date

Fees & Housing

Program Fall 2024 16 weeks Start Date End Date Fees & Housing $13,950
Program Academic year 2024-2025 Start Date * End Date TBD*
Program Spring 2024 15 weeks Application Due Deadline Passed Start Date End Date Fees & Housing $13,950
Program Spring 2025 14 weeks Start Date * End Date *

*Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

To help you budget, keep in mind that students are responsible for the cost of international airfare, local transportation, books and supplies, visas, and personal expenses. In addition, your college or university may charge additional fees for study abroad, or may require you to receive a transcript via CIEE's School of Record, which carries an additional fee of $500.

Program Fees

CIEE offers the most student support of any provider in its program fee, including an airport greeting, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and CIEE iNext travel protection with benefits.

Participation Confirmation = $300*

Educational Costs = $10,706**

Housing = $2,750

Insurance = $194

Total Fees = $13,950

Estimated Costs

Students are responsible and manage costs related to travel, meals, books, and personal expenses. Below are estimates for consideration.

Meals not included in program fee = $0

International Airfare = $425††

Local Transportation = $30†††

Books & Supplies = $25††††

Visa Fees = $75†††††

Personal expenses = $220††††††

Total Costs = $775

Optional Housing

CIEE accommodation options are detailed in the Housing section. Based on availability, Select or Select Plus Housing can be chosen during the application process for an additional fee:

Select Housing Fee = $750^

Financial Aid

CIEE offers the most grants and scholarships of any study abroad organization, including $8 million/year in travel grants, merit-based scholarships, institutional and MSI grants, and Gilman Go Global Grants.

See Scholarships

*non-refundable

**direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

For students in homestays, families provide all meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner). For students in apartments, you should budget approx. $272 per month for groceries if you plan on making your own meals, and more if you plan on eating out regularly.

††Round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

†††Airport transfer a the end of the program.Participants stay within walking distance from Host University and CIEE Center

††††Participants usually do not buy the books as they are available in the library and supplies are minimal

†††††Paid upon departure at the airport

††††††$100 emergency fund + cell phone expense + toiletries

^first-come, first serve, based on availability

Program Fees

CIEE offers the most student support of any provider in its program fee, including an airport greeting, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and CIEE iNext travel protection with benefits.

Estimated Costs

Students are responsible and manage costs related to travel, meals, books, and personal expenses. Below are estimates for consideration.

Financial Aid

CIEE offers the most grants and scholarships of any study abroad organization, including $8 million/year in travel grants, merit-based scholarships, institutional and MSI grants, and Gilman Go Global Grants.

See Scholarships

Program Fees

CIEE offers the most student support of any provider in its program fee, including an airport greeting, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and CIEE iNext travel protection with benefits.

Participation Confirmation = $300*

Educational Costs = $10,706**

Housing = $2,750

Insurance = $194

Total Fees = $13,950

Estimated Costs

Students are responsible and manage costs related to travel, meals, books, and personal expenses. Below are estimates for consideration.

Meals not included in program fee = $0

International Airfare = $425††

Local Transportation = $30†††

Books & Supplies = $25††††

Visa Fees = $75†††††

Personal expenses = $225††††††

Total Costs = $780

Optional Housing

CIEE accommodation options are detailed in the Housing section. Based on availability, Select or Select Plus Housing can be chosen during the application process for an additional fee:

Select Housing Fee = $750^

Financial Aid

CIEE offers the most grants and scholarships of any study abroad organization, including $8 million/year in travel grants, merit-based scholarships, institutional and MSI grants, and Gilman Go Global Grants.

See Scholarships

*non-refundable

**direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

For students in homestays, families provide all meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner). For students in apartments, you should budget approx. $272 per month for groceries if you plan on making your own meals, and more if you plan on eating out regularly.

††round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

†††Airport transfer a the end of  the program. Participants stay within walking distance from the host university and CIEE Center

††††Participants usually do not buy the books as they are available in the library and supplies are minimal

†††††Paid upon departure at the airport

††††††$100 emergency fund + cell phone expense + toiletries

^first-come, first serve, based on availability

Program Fees

CIEE offers the most student support of any provider in its program fee, including an airport greeting, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and CIEE iNext travel protection with benefits.

Estimated Costs

Students are responsible and manage costs related to travel, meals, books, and personal expenses. Below are estimates for consideration.

Financial Aid

CIEE offers the most grants and scholarships of any study abroad organization, including $8 million/year in travel grants, merit-based scholarships, institutional and MSI grants, and Gilman Go Global Grants.

See Scholarships

What's Included

Tuition

Housing

Pre-departure Advising

Advising before you depart to set goals and answer questions

Optional on-site airport meet-and-greet

Orientation

Introduction to your program plus practical information about living in your host city

On-site Staff

Full-time program leadership and support in your city

Cultural and/or Co-curricular Activities

Excursions and/or Study Tours

Travel Protection

CIEE iNext travel protection

24/7 emergency on-site support

Meals

Staff

Our Staff

Lucía Agüero

Center Director

Lucía Agüero has a BA in Latin American Spanish and Literature and a MA in Creative Writing. She is the author of poems and short stories published in several anthologies.

Dorka Tejada

Custom & College Senior Program Coordinator

Dorka Tejada earned her technical degree in Agronomy at Loyola Dajabón, Dominican Republic, and has taken numerous business administration, tourism, and hotel management courses.

Randolp Valenzuela

HSSA & College Program Coordinator

Randolp Valenzuela has a degree in electrical technics and has taken numerous courses in business administration and media communication. He has more than a decade of experience coordinating youth camps...

Get Started Steps

Get Started

Here’s what you need to do to take the next steps:

1

Start an Application
You're one step closer to an amazing study abroad experience!

2

Connect With Your Campus Study Abroad Office 
Share your plans and confirm you're on track to meet all required steps to go abroad.

3

Contact Us 
Send us an email if you still have questions or need information about applying to this program.

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