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Quick Info

By Term

  • Fall 2014
  • Spring 2014
  • Spring 2015
  • Academic year 2014-2015
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Dates:
09/08/2014 - 12/20/2014
Deadlines:
Extended to: 06/01/2014
Credit:
15 - 18 semester / 22.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
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Dates:
02/03/2014 - 05/24/2014 *
Deadlines:
Extended to: 12/01/2013
Credit:
15 - 18 semester / 22.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
TBA
Deadlines:
11/01/2014
Credit:
15 - 18 semester / 22.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
09/08/2014 - TBA
Deadlines:
Extended to: 06/01/2014
Credit:
see credit information below
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
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Study Abroad in Naples
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Program Overview

Program Overview

Whether you’re an experienced Italian student, or you have no background in the language, there’s a study abroad program for you in Naples, Italy.

In a dynamic city renowned for its influence on greater Italian culture, CIEE offers two tracks of study to develop your language skills and deepen your understanding of the country. Through intensive language study, a range of courses taught in English and Italian, student guides, cultural activities and excursions to local and regional sites, CIEE study abroad in Italy offers you a challenging and truly unique and experience abroad.

Study abroad in Naples and you will:

  • Enroll in a wide range of liberal arts courses at an Italian university with highly effective Italian language teaching
  • Speak Italian everyday in an authentic and vibrant Italian environment
  • Ease into life in Naples with the guidance of Italian roommates and local student guides
  • Explore Naples and the Campania region and take overnight field trips to locations such as Rome, the Amalfi Coast, or Sicily
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The CIEE Difference

The CIEE Difference

Coursework

Enroll in a variety of specialized CIEE courses taught in both English and Italian. Use the city’s sites and museums to explore Art and Architecture in Naples; study the rich history of Italian film and music; Urban Development; International Migration; Italian Cuisine, and more. You’ll also have access to a full range of courses at the University of Naples “L’Orientale.”

Cultural Activities

The academic study abroad program is supplemented with excursions to local places of interest and cultural activities such as local festivals and seasonal events, theater, art sites, and museums (such as Capodimonte Museum, the Bourbon Royal Palace, and historical churches in the old town and surrounding areas).

You’ll also enjoy a number of group dinners open to local and international university students and extended excursions to field trips to nearby locations such as Rome, the Amalfi Coast, and Matera.

Language and Culture Partners

In Naples, you’ll also be paired with native university students for a variety of language and cultural exchange activities throughout the semester. These students help provide you with additional language support and a firsthand look at the lifestyle of your Italian peers.

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Dates, Deadlines & Fees

Dates, Deadlines & Fees

We want to make sure you get the most out of your experience when you study abroad with CIEE, which is why we offer the most inclusions in our fees.

The program fee includes:

  • Tuition and housing
  • Pre-departure advising and optional on-site airport meet and greet
  • Full-time program leadership and support
  • Field trips and cultural activities
  • CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits
Please note, program dates are subject to change. Please contact your CIEE Study Abroad Advisor before purchasing airfare. Click the button to view more detailed information about dates and fees as well as estimated additional costs. Please talk with your University Study Abroad Advisor about additional fees that may be charged by your home institution when participating in a program abroad.
Program
Application Due
Start Date
End Date
Costs
Fall 2014 (15 wks)
Extended to: 06/01/2014
09/08/2014
12/20/2014
$17,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$14,123
Housing
$3,325
Insurance
$102

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee
$2,250
International Airfare *
$1,750
Local Transportation
$250
Books & Supplies
$150
Potential travel to consulate for visa **
$500
Personal expenses
$2,200

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

** while there is not typically a fee for the visa application, students may need to travel to the consulate to apply

More Information
Spring 2014 (16 wks)
Extended to: 12/01/2013
02/03/2014
05/24/2014
$17,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$14,123
Housing
$3,325
Insurance
$102

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee
$2,250
International Airfare *
$1,750
Local Transportation
$250
Books & Supplies
$150
Potential travel to consulate for visa **
$500
Personal expenses
$2,200

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

** while there is not typically a fee for the visa application, students may need to travel to the consulate to apply

More Information
Spring 2015
11/01/2014
TBA
TBA

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

Estimated Additional Costs

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

More Information
Academic year 2014-2015
Extended to: 06/01/2014
09/08/2014
TBA
$33,900

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$26,848
Housing
$6,650
Insurance
$102

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee
$4,500
International Airfare *
$1,750
Local Transportation
$500
Books & Supplies
$300
Potential travel to consulate for visa **
$500
Personal expenses
$4,400

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

** while there is not typically a fee for the visa application, students may need to travel to the consulate to apply

More Information
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Eligibility
2.75 Overall GPA

Eligibility

  • Overall GPA 2.75
  • Language and Culture Track: 0-3 semesters of college-level Italian or the equivalent
  • Liberal Arts Track: 4 or more semesters of college-level Italian or the equivalent
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    Recommended Credit

    Recommended Credit

    Total recommended credit for the semester is 15–18 semester/22.5–27 quarter hours, and 30 semester/45 quarter hours for the academic year.

    Course contact hours are 45 and recommended credit

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    Program Requirements

    Program Requirements

    A full course load for the semester is five or six courses. All study abroad students enroll in a required, intensive Italian language course at the start of each semester. Following the intensive language session, all students are required to continue their Italian language study at the appropriate level throughout the semester. Additionally, students select three or four remaining courses from CIEE or a combination of CIEE and Orientale courses.

    Students who wish to audit an Orientale course may do so in addition to the full course load. Academic year students do not participate in the intensive language program in their second semester. Academic year students who have completed Advanced II are not required to take Italian language in their second semester.

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    About the City

    About The City

    Framed by nearby Mount Vesuvius, Naples is squeezed onto a narrow strip of land with the city rising almost vertically from its bay. Traversing the narrow streets of the most densely populated city in Europe, one feels transported to ancient Roman times and sometimes to a third world country. While it has a reputation as a tough city, Naples is also known for the friendliness and openness of its inhabitants, its stunning Baroque art and architecture, and its cuisine. At the heart of its large urban area, the central historical district where students live and study has been renovated and revitalized in recent years.

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    Meet The Staff

    Meet The Staff

    Staff Image

    Serena Fusco

    Dr. Serena Fusco earned her Ph.D. from L’Orientale in Comparative Literature. In 2006 she was awarded a Research Fellowship and spent a year at the University of California at Berkeley where she was a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Chinese Studies, researching the literatures of the Chinese Diaspora. She worked as an American Literature and English language instructor at L’Orientale for several years; from 2000 to 2009 she also worked at the Capodimonte Museum in Naples. She currently teaches Comparative Literature at L’Orientale. Her past and present research interests include modernity, post-modernity, and cultural translation; Asian American and Chinese American literature; feminist and queer theory and criticism; American literature and culture of the late 19th century and of the 1990s; photography; and the cultural representations that shape academic internationalization. In addition to Italian, Dr. Fusco speaks English, French, Chinese, German, and Spanish.

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    Molto di ciò che viene comunemente considerato all’estero come “italiano” spesso si rivela essere più specificamente napoletano: dalle tradizioni culinarie alle canzoni popolari, dalla filosofia alle arti, dagli stereotipi negativi sulla società italiana fino al potente fascino del suo paesaggio naturale. È impossibile comprendere a fondo l’Italia senza cercare di comprendere Napoli. Da comunità inserita nell’orbita della Magna Grecia, successivamente al cuore dell’Impero Romano, attraversando influenze nord-africane ed europee, Napoli divenne gradualmente un’importante capitale ed una delle più grandi realtà urbane nell’Europa del Settecento.

    Studiare a Napoli vi permetterà di entrare in contatto con la storia italiana e il suo presente mutevole, attraverso corsi che vanno dalla letteratura contemporanea al cinema, al ruolo di Napoli all’interno delle nuove migrazioni internazionali. Potrete migliorare il vostro italiano in un ambiente ottimale, e concedervi delle piacevoli escursioni nella vicina costiera amalfitana, o passare un weekend rigenerante al mare in una delle isole, godendo della proverbiale ospitalità e della buona cucina!

    Ma come Partenope, la Sirena mitologica da cui la città prende il suo nome originario, il fascino esercitato da questa città non è mai ordinario, né blando. Napoli è oggi una città di forti contrasti, caotica e tumultuosa come la folla nei suoi vicoli, ma anche placida e silenziosa come i suoi numerosi chiostri, profana e spirituale, post-industriale e tuttavia magnifica e selvaggia come la bellezza del suo vulcano, della baia e delle isole. Se quello che state cercando è una cultura autentica e vibrante, una località unica, e un’esperienza di vita che possa mettervi in discussione, Napoli è la città che fa per voi.

    — Serena Fusco, Resident Director

    Staff Image

    Camilla Balsamo

    Resident Coordinator Camilla Balsamo's involvement with study abroad began when she attended her high school senior year in Colorado, graduating with honors. Camilla has a BA in Modern Philology and a MA in Comparative Literature from L'Orientale. She has been coordinating cultural projects organized by the Orientale and international partners, such as the project "Europe as a Space of Translation", In addition to Italian, Camilla speaks fluent English and French, and some Catalan. She has also worked as and instructor of English and as an instructor of Italian to second-language learners, and has extensively translated from Italian into English, from English into Italian (among else, selected works by Gertrude Stein), and from French into Italian. Her current research interests focus on European literature, langauge philosophy, and cultural translatability.

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    Where You'll Study

    Where You'll Study

    Founded in 1732 by a missionary returned from China, the UniversitàdegliStudidi Napoli “L’Orientale” (University of Naples “L’Orientale," or just “the Orientale”) is based in historic central Naples. The Orientale is a center for the study of foreign languages and cultures—not only Asian but also Middle Eastern, African, European, and American, that is unique in Italy and has few rivals in Europe. There are approximately 10,500 students and 250 faculty. CIEE students have access to the University libraries, computer center, language lab and media center, student canteen services, and sports facilities.

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    Housing & Meals

    Housing & Meals

    Study abroad students live in furnished apartments with CIEE and Italian roommates. The furnished apartments are within walking distance to the historic center. Students have their own room with a shared living, kitchen, bathroom, and dining areas. Meals are not included in the program fee and are the responsibility of the student. Numerous stores for buying food and other items are within walking distance from the apartments. The historic center is also scattered with eateries of many kinds.

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    Orientations

    Orientations

    Students begin their study abroad experience in Naples before leaving home—by participating in a CIEE Online Pre-Departure Orientation. Meeting with students online, the Resident Director shares information about the program and site, highlighting issues that alumni have said are important, and giving students time to ask questions before leaving home. The online orientation allows students to connect with others in the group, reflect on what they want to get out of the program, and learn what others in the group would like to accomplish. The CIEE goal for the pre-departure orientation is simple: to help students understand more about the program and site, as well as their goals for the program, so that they arrive to the program well-informed and return home having made significant progress toward their goals.

    Each semester begins with a mandatory orientation session organized by CIEE Resident Staff. It includes an academic orientation, an introduction to local customs and culture, information on personal safety, practical advice on daily life in the new surroundings, and cultural activities in Naples. During orientation, students are hosted in a hotel and meals are provided. Italian roommates and other Orientale students serve as cultural and practical guides during the first weeks of the program. Immediately after the initial orientation session, CIEE students begin their intensive Italian language instruction. Ongoing support is provided on an individual and group basis throughout the program.

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    Internet

    Internet

    Wireless Internet is available in all the University buildings and CIEE students can access it upon request of an Orientale account. Computers are available for student use, free of charge, at the University’s computer labs and media centers. These facilities, however, have limited hours. Students are encouraged to bring a wireless-enabled laptop.

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    Culture

    Culture

    The academic study abroad program is supplemented with excursions to local places of interest and cultural activities such as local festivals and seasonal events, theater, art sites, and museums (such as Capodimonte Museum, the Bourbon Royal Palace, and historical churches in the old town and surrounding areas), as well as unique activities such as a visit to a costume factory. The opportunity of visiting local cooperatives and NGOs is also offered. Students are grouped by language level whenever possible. Group dinners open to local and international Orientale students provide an opportunity for sharing cross-cultural experiences. In addition, field trips to nearby locations such as Rome, the Amalfi Coast, and Matera provide participants with a solid understanding of this region of Italy.

    Immersion

    Roommates and Student Guides

    For the first few weeks of the program, Italian roommates and/or other Orientale students assist CIEE students. Roommates and Student Guides help the CIEE student get to know the historic center of Naples, the University, and help with bureaucratic processes.

    Language and Culture Partners

    Study abroad students are also paired with Orientale students for a variety of language and cultural exchange activities throughout the semester. These students help provide CIEE participants with additional language support and a firsthand look at the lifestyle of their Italian peers.

    University Sports Facilities

    CIEE students have access to the Centro UniversitarioSportivo (C.U.S), which is located a short subway ride from the city center. C.U.S is a recently-built University sports center, including indoor and outdoor swimming pools; gyms; professional fields for soccer, rugby, tennis, and track-and-field; basketball and volleyball courts; yoga rooms; and more.

    The Neapolitan Dialect

    While the standard Italian language is commonly used in all settings, ildialettonapoletano enjoys a life of its own next to it. Neapolitan is currently spoken in the Naples area and, with some variations, in the Campania region beyond the city's limits. It has its roots in Latin, but has been forged by many historical occupations and by the encounters of many cultures and peoples inhabiting Southern Italy: Greeks, Normans, Byzantine, Arabs, Spanish, and French. While it has never been the official language of the territory and is nowadays considered a dialect, for centuries it has inspired a powerful literary, dramatic, and musical tradition. It is not used at the University or official settings, but students are introduced to it during orientation.

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    Academics

    Academics

    The Liberal Arts Program is organized in two tracks.

    • The Liberal Arts track is geared to students with four or more semesters of Italian who are interested in learning about Italy from a southern perspective in a very dynamic city such as Naples – one that is highly representative of the country, yet different from the quite “static” image of Italy that is sometimes offered by traditional destinations as Florence and Rome. Courses are taught in Italian.
    • The Language and Culture track is designed for students from a variety of backgrounds (among them, Urban Studies, Cultural Studies, Environmental Studies, Social Science, Cinema Studies) with little or no previous knowledge of Italian, who are interested in learning about a dynamic urban reality such as Naples, one that boasts a strong local identity yet has always reflected the greater transformations occurring in Italy and Europe. Courses in this track are taught in English, with one course per semester offered as “language through content” for students who place at the intermediate level.

    Academic Culture

    The University of Naples “L’Orientale”, where the study abroad program is hosted, is an intensely multicultural environment with a prestigious tradition for teaching languages, literatures, and world cultures.

    CIEE Courses will be small; Orientale courses will be small to mid-size. Both CIEE and Orientale courses are academically challenging, dynamic, and involve daily reading and homework assignments, as well as required attendance. Classrooms are modern, comfortable, and equipped with the most up-to-date technology used for instruction.

    CIEE courses are designed for U.S. undergraduates, and the teaching and learning methods will be familiar to most U.S. students. Learning takes place through a coherent blend of lectures, group seminars, visits, and practical work. CIEE class size is small with classes taking place Monday through Friday.

    Classes at Orientale range from 10–60 students, with the average class size made up of about 20 students. Orientale classes meet from one to three times per week and the average class duration is about two hours, though it can range from one to four hours. The standard format is lecture, though often supplemented with seminars in the latter half of the semester.

    Following arrival and orientation, study abroad students take two weeks of intensive Italian language classes, according to their level of language placement. After that, the overall course schedule follows the typical organization of semesters at the Orientale, with fall courses taught October through December and spring courses taught March through May. Some Orientale courses extend into January and into June, but early exams are permitted for CIEE students.

    Nature of Classes

    CIEE classes are primarily with CIEE students, although Italian students are invited to enroll. Regular Orientale courses are with Italian and other international students.

    CIEE Community Language Commitment

    All study abroad students take part in the CIEE Community Language Commitment. As they gain proficiency in Italian, resident staff encourages them to use their language skills in everyday settings. Students with an advanced level of Italian are also expected to interact academically using Italian. The more students participate the more a community that contributes to Italian language proficiency and understanding of Italian society and academic world develops.

    CIEE students share apartments with Italian Orientale students. Besides gradually increasing the amount of Italian used in daily interaction, Italian roommates and CIEE students work out a plan for language commitment together with CIEE Italian language instructors.

    Grading System

    CIEE course assessment is grounded in a consistent blend of U.S.-style and local-style methodology. It is based on the students’ overall performance, including class participation, mid-term tests and/or papers, and a final written and/or oral examination. Assessment is based on a U.S. letter grading scale, paralleled with an Italian 30-point scale.

    Assessment in Orientale classes is based on a combination of students’ performance during the course, including writing assignments and a final oral examination. Italian academic culture traditionally emphasizes the final oral examination, where students are encouraged to answer questions regarding course materials while articulating a personal perspective on them. However, many courses have now adopted written final tests, or a combination of written tests and oral examinations. Assessment is based on a 30-point scale and is converted to a U.S. grading scale.

    Language of Instruction

    Italian

    Faculty

    CIEE courses are taught by faculty from local Italian universities, primarily the Orientale. Orientale courses are taught by Orientale faculty.
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    Course Description

    Course Description

    All Courses

    Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be cancelled due to insufficient enrollment.

    CIEE Study Center Syllabi

    To view the most recent syllabi for courses taught by CIEE at our Study Centers, visit our syllabi site.

    CIEE Required Italian Language Courses

    All students take Italian Language during the whole program. Prior to the beginning of semester courses, students take two weeks of Intensive Italian classes, according to their level of language placement. After the end of the intensive language pre-session, students continue their language instruction as a semester course.

    Students with no prior background in Italian are automatically placed at the Beginning level. Students with Intermediate background in Italian (1-4 semesters) are required to take a placement text and will be placed in the appropriate language class according to the text results.

    ITAL 1501 NACL—Intensive Italian Language, Beginning I

    ITAL 1502 NACL—Intensive Italian Language, Beginning II

    ITAL 2501 NACL—Intensive Italian Language, Intermediate I

    ITAL 2502 NACL—Intensive Italian Language, Intermediate II

    These courses provide students with basic skills needed to communicate on a daily basis. They include grammar, conversation, listening, and reading comprehension. Students are placed according to language background.

    ITAL 1002 NACL—Semester Italian Language, Beginning II

    ITAL 2001 NACL—Semester Italian Language, Intermediate I

    ITAL 2002 NACL—Semester Italian Language, Intermediate II

    ITAL 3001 NACL—Semester Italian Language, Advanced I

    In these courses, students continue their language study during the semester, after being placed in the appropriate class.

    ITAL 3501 NALA

    Intensive Italian Language, Advanced I
    This course is specifically designed for advanced students and aims to develop all four skills (grammar, conversation, listening, and reading comprehension), with an emphasis on oral competence to help students integrate into Italian life.

    ITAL 3001 NALA

    Semester Italian Language, Advanced II
    This course aims to develop all four skills (grammar, conversation, listening, and reading comprehension) and utilizes a variety of media for instruction (films, CDs, newspapers, magazines, and so on).

    CIEE Content Courses

    Language and Culture Track (Offered in English)

    AHIS 3001 NALA

    Art and Architecture in Naples
    A quick look at textbooks on Italian art reveals the low status in which Naples has been held since the time Renaissance artist and art historian Giorgio Vasari made his negative pronouncements on the city. What many people do not know, however, is that during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, Naples was the largest city of the Italian peninsula, attracting a coterie of foreign rulers, and garnered international status as an important center for artistic culture and production. It also attracted artists and architects from all over Italy and Europe. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the rich artistic and architectural heritage of Naples and its surroundings by considering its specific and unique character as well as its role within the context of the Italian peninsula. Through lectures and visits throughout the city and its surroundings, students learn about Naples and analyze the political, religious, and ideological content of its art and architecture and its role within Italy.

    ANTH 3001 NALA

    Anthropology: The Invention of the South
    This course focuses on the construction inherent in the representation of Naples, starting from the 16th century to the present, through literature, social research, and cinema. The course aims to make visible, and deconstruct, the symbolic space that this emblematic Mediterranean city occupies in the construction of an historical, political, and anthropological difference between South and North.

    CINE 3001 NALA

    Italian Cinema
    The history of Italian cinema is significant not only in terms of what it has been able to express on its own, but also in terms of its impact and influence on the past and the present of world cinema. This course explores Italian cinematic production, starting from the aftermath of World War II until today. Focusing on individual works, the course examines both the scholars’ habit of concentrating exclusively on the established Masters, and the ideological censorship associated with the evaluation of the movies—in terms of acting, directions taken by screenwriters and directors, the dynamics of reception by the audience, and also the moral issues underpinning the definition of both the subject and the economic investment in it.

    CULA 3001 NALA

    Italian and Neapolitan Cuisine: Local Food, Global Implications
    This course analyzes food as a fundamental component of the social practices that characterize different cultures. Food is a marker of cultural identity both in its material existence (what products are available and why, what is prepared and consumed, etc.) and in its symbolic and ritualized forms. The course will start with a focus on Naples, its cuisine, and the role of food in Neapolitan culture, and will subsequently broaden this focus to reflect on the exportation of Neapolitan and more generally Italian food culture, and how these contribute to shape the cultural perception of both Naples and Italy from the outside.

    INRE 3001 NALA

    Human Rights, Multiculturalism, and Cultural Diversity: The Italian and the European Experience
    This interdisciplinary course explores the significance and meaning of multiculturalism in European society—and, in particular, Italian society. After a brief introduction to the historical background, the focus will be on the distinction between the U.S. experience (the “melting pot”) and the recent experience of immigrant integration in Europe and Italy, based on the multiplication of cultures. In particular, the course tackles strategies for solving problems related to integration and avoiding the clash of cultures.

    ITST 3002 NALA/POLI 3001 NALA

    Environmental Politics, Economy, and Society in Campania
    This course tackles the recent history of environmental politics in the Campania region, providing a national and international context for the sixteen-year long “emergency status” in dealing with waste production, disposal, and handling in the local area, while pointing to the present status of the issue, its social and economic implications, and possible future developments.

    MUSI 3001 NALA

    Sounding Naples: Music and the City from the Eighteenth Century to the Present
    The course is meant to offer a history of Naples through its musical traditions, starting from its role as European cultural capital in the eighteenth century (with the Neapolitan school of operatic castrati) up to contemporary experimentations such as Almamegretta's dub. The syllabus will include the recent rediscovery of the Neapolitan popular tradition by Roberto De Simone in his La gattacenerentola together with other contemporary renditions of Naples as 'musical city' such as John Turturro's Passione. The aim is to give students a broad picture of the multifaceted identity of the city through a journey across its many musical languages, from popular to experimental, from high art to grass-root protest. The course will show how musical culture in Naples emerges as an expression of its ‘alternative modernity’, where tradition and innovation can never be separated.

    SOCI 3001 NALA

    Society, Urban Development, and Governance in Naples from the Birth of the Italian Nation-State to the Present
    This course tracks social, political, and economic systems in Naples across different historical moments: from the city’s role as a capital under Bourbon rule to its “decentered” position in the new-born Italian nation-state; the “industrial” phase of the early 20th century; the city in the Mediterranean-oriented expansion of the Fascist state; the post-WWII housing-oriented economic speculation; Naples’ role in the “Southern Issue” in the 1960s and 1970s; the socioeconomic choc caused by the 1980s earthquake; the “Renaissance” of the 1990s, and the recent backlash and political questioning of this Renaissance in the early 21st century. Special attention is devoted to the interconnectedness between phenomena in the social structure and governmental choices, and to the emergence of the “parallel” criminal power of the Camorra.

    Liberal Arts Track (Offered in Italian)

    AHIS 3001 NALA

    Art and Architecture in Naples
    A quick look at textbooks on Italian art reveals the low status in which Naples has been held since the time Renaissance artist and art historian Giorgio Vasari made his negative pronouncements on the city. What many people do not know, however, is that during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, Naples was the largest city of the Italian peninsula, attracting a coterie of foreign rulers, and garnered international status as an important center for artistic culture and production. It also attracted artists and architects from all over Italy and Europe. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the rich artistic and architectural heritage of Naples and its surroundings by considering its specific and unique character as well as its role within the context of the Italian peninsula. Through lectures and visits throughout the city and its surroundings, students learn about Naples and analyze the political, religious, and ideological content of its art and architecture and its role within Italy.

    CINE 3001 NALA

    Italian Cinema
    The history of Italian cinema is significant not only in terms of what it has been able to express on its own, but also in terms of its impact and influence on the past and the present of world cinema. This course explores Italian cinematic production, starting from the aftermath of World War II until today. Focusing on individual works, the course examines both the scholars’ habit of concentrating exclusively on the established Masters, and the ideological censorship associated with the evaluation of the movies—in terms of acting, directions taken by screenwriters and directors, the dynamics of reception by the audience, and also the moral issues underpinning the definition of both the subject and the economic investment in it.

    GEOG 3001 NALA

    Italy and International Migrations
    This course focuses on the new geography that has characterized the migratory phenomenon in Italy in the past thirty years. The course opens with an introduction to the complex network of international migrations, and subsequently explores the role of Italy from different perspectives: migrants as geopolitical actors and the role of borders; territorial transformations in Italian regions; the relation with the job market and leisure-time industry; urban politics and the transformation of the landscape; and the different uses of public spaces in major Italian urban areas. During classes, students have an opportunity to read journalistic reportspresenting life stories told by migrants who reside in Italy, and to watch films that focus on these issues.

    ITAL 3002 NALA

    Italian Composition
    Through a detailed analysis of written samples taken from a variety of sources, this course aims at making students aware of the differences—as well as the overlaps—in register between Italian oral and written language. Simultaneously, students are requested to actively engage in writing and produce a number of composition samples in Italian, paying attention to both grammatical accuracy and stylistic diversity. Special emphasis is given to topics related to Italian culture from a Southern perspective and in a Mediterranean context.

    ITST 3001 NALA

    The Italian South: Contemporary Literature, Theater, and Cinema
    After an introduction presenting the historical background and the literary antecedents, starting with founding fathers such as Giovanni Boccaccio, Jacopo Sannazzaro, and GiambattistaBasile, this interdisciplinary course explores the cultural life of the Italian South during the past two centuries. The focus will be on important literary, theater and cinematic figures like Luigi Pirandello, Giuseppe TomasidiLampedusa, Eduardo De Filippo, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Luchino Visconti. The main themes will be: ‘questionemeridionale’ and emigration,culture and social classes, people’s life, theater and masks in Naples, and the cultural importance of folk songs.

    MUSI 3001 NALA

    Sounding Naples: Music and the City from the Eighteenth Century to the Present

    The course is meant to offer a history of Naples through its musical traditions, starting from its role as European cultural capital in the eighteenth century (with the Neapolitan school of operatic castrati) up to contemporary experimentations such as Almamegretta's dub. The syllabus will include the recent rediscovery of the Neapolitan popular tradition by Roberto De Simone in his La gattacenerentola together with other contemporary renditions of Naples as 'musical city' such as John Turturro's Passione.The aim is to give students a broad picture of the multifaceted identity of the city through a journey across its many musical languages, from popular to experimental, from high art to grass-root protest. The course will show how musical culture in Naples emerges as an expression of its ‘alternative modernity’, where tradition and innovation can never be separated.

    University of Naples “L’Orientale” Courses

    The University is well known in Italy as a center for the study of a diverse range of subjects related to different geographical areas and cultures – from Western and Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean and the Middle East, to Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Facoltà (“Schools”) include Foreign Languages and Literatures, Arabic-Islamic and Mediterranean Studies, Letters and Philosophy, and Political Science. CIEE students are associated with the FacoltàdiLettere e Filosofia (“Letters and Philosophy”), but can enroll in courses from other Facoltà upon agreement with the Facoltà and the professor.*** Students must have the appropriate prerequisites for the course. While exams following regular University courses extend into January/ February and June/July, CIEE students are allowed to take early exams.

    For individual courses offered at the Orientale for a specific term, please visit www.unior.it it and click on “Facoltà”. The following is a list of disciplinary areas under which individual courses are grouped:

    Ancient Languages and Literatures
    Anthropology
    Archaeology
    Architecture
    Art History
    Business
    Comparative Literature
    Cultural Studies
    Economics
    Ethnology
    Film Studies
    Gender Studies
    Geography
    History
    Human Rights
    Interethnic Relations
    International Relations
    Language and Culture
    Law
    Linguistics
    Literary Criticism
    Media Studies
    Migration and Multiculturalism
    Modern Languages and Literatures
    Philology
    Philosophy
    Phonetics
    Political Science
    Semiotics
    Sociology
    Statistics
    Theater Studies
    Translation Studies

    ***Due to a recent reform of the national university system, the Facoltà (or schools) structure is expected to be replaced by a departmental organizational structure in the course of academic year 2012-13. This change will not affect the CIEE Study Center, CIEE students, nor the broad course/disciplinary offer of the Orientale.

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