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By Term

  • Fall 2014
  • Fall 2015
  • Spring 2015
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Dates:
09/08/2014 - 12/20/2014
Deadlines:
Extended to: 05/01/2014
Credit:
15 - 18 semester / 22.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
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Dates:
TBA
Deadlines:
04/01/2015
Credit:
15 - 18 semester / 22.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
01/13/2015 - 05/09/2015 *
Deadlines:
Extended to: 10/31/2014
Credit:
15 - 18 semester / 22.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
TBA
Deadlines:
10/01/2015
Credit:
15 - 18 semester / 22.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
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Prague Future Cities Studio 2014

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Study Abroad in Prague
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Program Overview

Program Overview

Imagine working with leading experts and innovators to complete a real-world design project. Study with the latest thinkers and practitioners to gain an understanding of architecture and design within an emerging global context. Pursue hands-on design work in a state-of-the-art studio using the latest technology to address an aspect of the current global environment. And observe 2,000 years of architectural history at historical and current architectural sites in the Czech Republic – all with CIEE.

Study abroad in Prague and you’ll:

  • Study at the Architectural Institute of Prague (ARCHIP), the first international school of its kind with students representing nearly 20 nationalities
  • Take part in the Future Cities Design Studio, which features an interdisciplinary perspective
  • Work with local peers and architects to tackle design projects that encourage cross-cultural collaboration
  • Explore a range architectural styles at sites including the historical halls of Charles University, Prague Castle, Old Town, and more
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Scholarships & Grants

Scholarships & Grants

We want as many students as possible to benefit from studying abroad. That’s why CIEE awards more than $3 million every year – more than any other international educational organization – to make study abroad affordable.

Applicants to this program are eligible for the following scholarships and grants:

To be considered, simply check the “Scholarships and Grants” box on your program application.
Apply now

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The CIEE Difference

The CIEE Difference

Advance design studio and workshops

In a cutting-edge studio space in the heart of Prague, you’ll experiment with integrating methods used in animation, computational design, and programming as well as social sciences to push the limits of current technological advancements. You will work on projects that question, optimize, conserve, or reuse natural and built resources; provide healthful environments; and reduce the environmental impact of building footprints through morphogenetic, carbon-neutral, and bioclimatic design.

LECTURES

Seize the opportunity to attend open lectures and design critique sessions conducted by ARCHIP professors, visiting lecturers, and teaching staff. These lectures and sessions build on material covered during gallery visits and coursework on contemporary art and architecture. At the same time, you’ll be virtually connected to your peers and faculty on our other Global Architecture and Design programs in Barcelona and Berlin, so you can view all global lectures and workshops.

COLLABORATIVE PROJECTS

Theory meets practice. Work one-on-one and in small groups with local ARCHIP architecture students to analyze a current, real-world design challenge, develop potential solutions, and present a final proposal. When possible, you’ll also meet with working architects involved in the actual project assigned. These projects give both you and your Czech peers the opportunity to work across cultural lines and share new perspectives.

EXCURSIONS

CIEE excursions bring you face to face with the social and economic factors driving new construction and design. Explore sites like Prague Castle, Old Town, and Charles University, and go on overnight and day trips to locations throughout Bohemia and Moravia to get a bigger regional perspective. Travel to Brno, the Czech Republic’s second-largest city, to study the city’s renovation. Spend an overnight in a former mining town in the process of literally building a new identity. You’ll also travel to Berlin or Barcelona, where you’ll collaborate with students attending CIEE Global Architecture and Design programs there.

Partnerships

We believe in the power of collaboration. That’s why we developed this program in partnership with LEED-certified, award-winning architect and urban designer Maria Aiolova, our new Academic Director for CIEE Architecture and Design programs. Maria is an award-winning educator, architect, and urban designer based in New York City. She is co-founder of Terreform ONE and chair of the ONE Lab NY School for Design and Science.

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Dates, Deadlines & Fees

Dates, Deadlines & Fees

We want to make sure you get the most out of your experience when you study abroad with CIEE, which is why we offer the most inclusions in our fees.

The program fee includes:

  • Tuition and housing
  • Pre-departure advising and optional on-site airport meet and greet
  • Full-time program leadership and support
  • Field trips and cultural activities
  • CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits
Please note, program dates are subject to change. Please contact your CIEE Study Abroad Advisor before purchasing airfare. Click the button to view more detailed information about dates and fees as well as estimated additional costs. Please talk with your University Study Abroad Advisor about additional fees that may be charged by your home institution when participating in a program abroad.
Program
Application Due
Start Date
End Date
Costs
Fall 2014 (15 wks)
Extended to: 05/01/2014
09/08/2014
12/20/2014

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

Estimated Additional Costs

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

More Information
Fall 2015
04/01/2015
TBA
TBA
$18,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, local transportation pass, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$15,722
Housing ***
$2,715
Insurance
$113

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Meals vary by housing choice: Includes two meals per day for homestay students. Breakfast is included for dormitory students. No meals are included for students in apartments. Additionally, students who opt for and are placed in single-occupancy dorm rooms will be billed a supplemental fee of approximately $500, 4-6 weeks after the program starts.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,850
International Airfare **
$1,200
Local Transportation
$50
Books & Supplies
$450
Visa Fees ***
$125
Personal expenses
$2,200
Other ****
$145

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* For students in apartments. Students placed in homestays are provided with breakfast and dinner; additional meals for homestay students are estimated at $550 per semester. Students placed in the dormitory are provided with breakfast only; additional meals for dormitory students are estimated at $1,500 per semester.

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

*** average cost

**** Required Czech insurance

More Information
Spring 2015 (17 wks)
Extended to: 10/31/2014
01/13/2015
05/09/2015
$18,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, local transportation pass, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$15,722
Housing ***
$2,715
Insurance
$113

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Meals vary by housing choice: Includes two meals per day for homestay students. Breakfast is included for dormitory students. No meals are included for students in apartments. Additionally, students who opt for and are placed in single-occupancy dorm rooms will be billed a supplemental fee of approximately $500, 4-6 weeks after the program starts.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,850
International Airfare **
$1,200
Local Transportation
$50
Books & Supplies
$450
Visa Fees ***
$125
Personal expenses
$2,200
Other ****
$145

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* For students in apartments. Students placed in homestays are provided with breakfast and dinner; additional meals for homestay students are estimated at $550 per semester. Students placed in the dormitory are provided with breakfast only; additional meals for dormitory students are estimated at $1,500 per semester.

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

*** average cost

**** Required Czech insurance

More Information
Spring 2016
10/01/2015
TBA
TBA

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

Estimated Additional Costs

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

More Information
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Eligibility
2.75 Overall GPA

Eligibility

  • Overall GPA 2.75
  • Students must be majoring in Architecture, Environmental Design, Industrial Design, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Sustainability studies, Urban Design or minoring in these areas and have completed 2-3 semesters of design studio or a project-based course in their major.

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Recommended Credit

Recommended Credit

Total recommended credit is 15 – 18 semester/22.5 – 27 quarter hours.

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Program Requirements

Program Requirements

Students are required to take the following three courses: Future Cities Design Studio, Future Cities Seminar, Science, Engineering, and Technology Workshops.

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About the City

About The City

In Prague, you’ll find Frank Ghery’s Dancing House, a modern glass building with daring curvy lines, looking out over the Vltava River. Mozart, Kepler, and Einstein lived and worked in this fascinating city. You can hear phenomenal music – from classical to modern – at operas, festivals, and right on the street.

Since the Middle Ages Prague has been famous as one of the most beautiful cities of the world and has been attributed adjectives such as “golden,” “hundred-spired,” “the crown of the world.” The unique character of the city is also partly a consequence of its natural environment. Prague was built on nine hills along the Vltava river, which flows through the city for a distance of 31 km and forms a perfect unit with the city. The dominant features of the city architecture are reflected in the river: towers, church spires and cupolas, palaces and town houses, along with the greenery of gardens, parks and islands. Prague is now in its third great building boom in less than a century. So far, the latest growth spurt has attracted a few showpieces by Frank Gehry, Jean Nouvel, and Ricardo Bofils.

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Meet The Staff

Meet The Staff

Staff Image

Jana Cemusova

Resident Director

Jana Čemusová heads the CIEE Study Center in Prague, leading study abroad programs, customized partnerships with Charles University and other educational institutions. She served as a student services director from 2008 to 2011. Prior to joining CIEE in a full-time position, Jana gained extensive experience with CIEE students through her many years of teaching and leading Czech language instruction through the CIEE Study Center at Charles University.

Jana was a Fulbright scholar at the University of Kansas and has expertise in training language teachers and leading projects in immigrant communities. She served as a chair of Association of Czech Teachers Teaching Czech as a Foreign Language in 2003–2009.

Jana is a double graduate at the Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Philosophy, where she studied theory of culture (anthropology) and Czech language and creative studies at the Faculty of Education.

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Alessio Erioli, PhD

Key Faculty

Alessio Erioli is engineer and senior researcher at Università di Bologna, where he also teaches architectural design, MArch in biodigital architecture, and architectural engineering, and is a co-founder and coder at Co-de-iT (www.co-de-it.com). He has been an advisor for many master’s theses in engineering and architecture. He has lectured for (among others) IaaC (Barcelona), AA Visiting school in Paris, Accademia Belle Arti Bologna, TU Innsbruck, Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico). His interests interweave teaching and design ecologies in computational design, articulating complexity to trigger emergent potential. His recent interests regard the relations among matter and agency, particularly agent-based modeling simulation of complex adaptive systems in architecture coupled with form-finding strategies. He is also skilled in computational design and modeling on several platforms (Rhinoceros, Grasshopper, Processing, 3D Studio, Ecotect; scripting skills in C#, Python, RhinoScript).

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Martin Hejl

Key Faculty

Martin Heji is a European based architect, theorist, urbanist and educator. He is the founder of KOLMO.eu, an architectural and master planning think tank, and Loom on the Moon, an interdisciplinary platform for visual and motion design

Martin studied at a Faculty of Arts and Architecture of Technical University in Liberec. In 2003 he organized an International Summer School of Architecture “Workshop”in collaboration with Center of Theoretical Study /CTS/. A year after he worked as assistant in Enviromental Design Studio at FUA TUL under the leadership of Bořek Šípek and was a coordinator of Lecture Series of Young Czech Architects “Need Ideas?”

After his graduation in 2006 he worked in Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) in Copenhagen. In 2008 he joined a Rotterdam based Office for Metropolitan Architecture /OMA/ of Rem Koolhaas, where he worked for five years as designer and/or project leader on large urban design projects such as Waterfront City (Central Business District of Dubai), Al Shamal (masterplan of city for 2022 FIFA world cup) or Skolkovo City Centre Moscow (masterplan of Russian Silicon Valley).

He return to Prague in 2012 he continues his career as founding partner of KOLMO.eu where he leads with his wife architectural and research projects. “100 mil.m2” – a research project on collective and mass housing - has been chosen for representation of the Czech Republic at the 14th International Architecture Exhibition of la Biennale di Venezia. As partner at Loom on the Moon, Martin helped to restructure and redesign three channels for Czech Television, among which the major news channel in Czech Republic. Currently he is a professor at Faculty of Arts and Architecture of Technical University in Liberec where he leads his own Architectural Studio.

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Regina Loukotova

Key Faculty

Regina Loukotová is a practicing architect and the rector of the Architectural Institute of Prague (ARCHIP), the first private architectural college in the Czech Republic with instruction in English. She graduated from the Czech Technical University (CTU), Faculty of Architecture, where she also completed her postgraduate studies with an external stay at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design in Norway. Regina co-founded her own practice, Gemarc Studio, in 1999 with architect Martin Roubik. The studio has taken part in dozens of national and international competitions and achieved particular success with their Grand Egyptian Museum proposal in 2003, which was awarded honorable mention and was listed as one of ten competition finalists. The physical model of this project is a part of the permanent exposition of the National Gallery, Collection of Modern Art. Regina is also active within the Czech Chamber of Architects and a member of the Unit for Education. Previously, she worked as an instructor at CTU from 2000 to 2003.

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Veronika Tobiasova

Housing Coordinator

Veronika Tobiasova is responsible for managing housing in dorms, apartments, and local homes. She also manages solving student issues, the Flat Buddy program, Meet Czech Families and Friends, CIEE promotion, and study center greening. Veronika received her master’s degree in English and American studies and Spanish philology at Charles University in Prague, with specialization in American and Argentinean literature. During high school, she was an exchange student in Madison, WI for one year. She also studied at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid in Spain for a year. Her previous working experience includes teaching both English and Spanish in different language schools and a high school in Prague. She also worked for a trade promotion agency and the Peruvian Embassy.

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Eva Tomiskova

Program Coordinator

Eva Tomišková works as a program coordinator and her main responsibilities involve orientation, academic trips planning, volunteering program coordination, site visit planning, catering and overall office management. Eva is a graduate of The Technical University in Liberec, the Faculty of Education, with major in social studies and English language. Prior to joining CIEE, Eva gained extensive experience in human recourses and education in the Czech Republic and abroad.

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Imrich Vaško

Key Faculty

Imrich Vaško is an architect, writer and professor in Prague. He graduated from the Department of Architectural Design, Academy of Fine Arts and Design (VŠVU), Bratislava, Slovak Republic. After his return from Fulbright Scholarship at the Yale University in 1991 he set up the Laboratory of Architecture at the VŠVU. In 1998 he acted as a guest professor at the Rhode Island's School of Design. He lectured at Columbia University, Pratt Institute, RICE, Cornell University, CCNY, Universität für angewandte Kunst and Akademie der bildenden Kunst in Vienna. He also co-organized international architectural forums with Daniel Libeskind, Greg Lynn, Monika Mitášova, Marian Zervan and others. He cooperated with Jan Tabor and Wolf D. Prix on project WI:BRA. Amongst his focuses are conceptual and visionary architecture, urbanism, and installations. He deals with the tendencies of central European architecture and parallel modernism. He is co-author of the joined exposition of the Czech and Slovak Republics at the 7th Biennale of Architecture in Venice in 2000. He also had a solo exhibition at the Fragner Gallery in 2001.

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Adam Vukmanov

Key Faculty

Adam Vukmanov is architect, lecturer, and principal of VAD studio, a Prague based practice for computational design and research. Adam received his master’s degree in architecture (with honors) in Greg Lynn's master class at University of Applied Arts, Vienna, in June 2009. After graduation, he worked with Span-arch on the Austrian Expo Pavilion in Shanghai. Until July 2012, he continued his career in London as a project architect at Acme, completing designs for several large-scale projects in the UK and the Gulf region.

Adam is a guestl at the Academy of Arts, Architecture, and Design in Prague; the Center for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) in Copenhagen; and the Department of Theoretical and Applied Aesthetics at the School of Architecture in Lund, Sweden. Previously, Adam has taught at the Architectural Association Visiting School in Paris and the EASA workshop in Greece. He has critiqued at the Southern Californian Institute of Architecture, OTIS Institute of Architecture in Los Angeles; the Bartlett School of Architecture in London; and the Faculty of Architecture in Belgrade. Adam's work has been widely published and he has won several awards for his projects. In 2011 he finished a six-month MAK Schindler residency in Los Angeles for an independent research project on a team with Julia Koerner.

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Where You'll Study

Where You'll Study

ARCHIP- Architectural Institute of Prague

ARCHIP is the first international school of architecture in Prague. All instructions are in English with an emphasis on international students and faculty. The size and focus of the school suitably complements existing institutions providing architectural education in the Czech Republic, which makes for a broader choice of options for students interested in studying architecture. The program of the school is based in studio instruction; other professional courses should relate to it and complement it. Lectures in theory combine with practice-oriented seminars, excursions and workshops – practical instruction is assigned a great weight in the study program. ARCHIP puts students in contact with the practice and helps them understand architecture in its context.

The instruction takes place in Prague and in other parts of the Czech Republic. The size of the school (60 students per year) allows faculty and students to openly communicate and creatively collaborate during instruction, tutoring and the final evaluation of student works. ARCHIP is a platform for architecture in general, with its own information, promotion, and publication activities. It has its own exhibition space and a professional reference library with a reading room with magazines. ARCHIP organizes lifelong learning courses and hosts lectures by leading local and international architects. Excursions to outstanding local and international architecture are organized throughout the year. The school keeps close contact with the professional and lay community, and with other local and international institutions in the field.

ARCHIP is located in the Kartografie Praha Building, a former printing workshop that has kept its industrial character after renovation. The Kartografie building is located in Prague 7, one of the smallest Prague districts, which stretches along the left bank of the Vltava River, representing a peaceful extension to Prague city centre. ARCHIP is currently expanding into an additional floor in the building and this presents an opportunity for CIEE to secure a high-quality studio space in this historic building. In addition, students will have access to the rest of the ARCHIP facilities, its library, lecture rooms and labs. The cultural centre DOX is also located in the neighborhood.

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Housing & Meals

Housing & Meals

Housing is included in the study abroad program fee. Provision of meals depends on the housing option. Students have several housing choices and are asked to select an option prior to departure.

Homestay with a Czech Family—This is the best option for students looking to fully immerse themselves in the Czech culture. Dinner and breakfast, on the family’s schedule, are included as is a single room. Homestays are typically located in residential areas, so students will have up to a 45-minute commute to the CIEE Study Center.

Charles University Dormitory— This dormitory houses approximately 35 CIEE and local students (CIEE Dorm Buddies). Breakfast is included and students can use the two modest kitchenettes available to prepare other meals. The dormitory is a 10-minute walk from the CIEE Study Center.

CIEE-Administered Apartments— Each CIEE apartment houses three CIEE students as well as one Charles University student (CIEE Flat Buddy). Apartments consist of two bedrooms with shared areas including a fully equipped kitchen and bathroom. Please note that meals and Internet fees are not included with this option. CIEE apartments are located in various neighborhoods and require a maximum 35-minute commute to CIEE.

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Orientations

Orientations

You'll begin your study abroad experience in Prague even before leaving home by participating in a CIEE online pre-departure orientation during which the resident director will share information about the program and site. A mandatory three-week orientation session, which includes an intensive language program, is conducted in Prague at the beginning of the program and will introduce you to the academic program, country, culture, extracurricular options, program faculty, and provide practical information about living in the Czech Republic. You'll receive ongoing orientation on aspects of Czech culture through the elective course and individual appointments with the resident director.

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Internet

Internet

You are encouraged to bring a wireless-enabled laptop. Internet connections are available in the dormitory for free, and may be available in the apartments for an additional fee; service is often shared with CIEE flat buddies and other roommates. You will have free access to wireless connections and a computer laboratory during the week at the CIEE Study Center and at other Charles University facilities. In addition, Prague offers a good network of Internet cafés for a small fee.

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Culture

Culture

The program includes visits to sites of historical and cultural importance in Prague such as Prague Castle, Old Town, the historical halls of Charles University, theater, and opera. In addition, academically coordinated field trips to locations in Bohemia and Moravia are arranged, allowing participants to gain a wider perspective of the region and a greater understanding of studied academic topics and Czech culture. CIEE also organizes optional guided field trips to Berlin, Krakow, and Vienna with CIEE professors at an additional cost. This program includes a selection of special activities, field trips, and excursions that introduce students to local media.

CIEE International Students Club (ISC)

CIEE promotes and encourages cultural exchange between CIEE and Charles University (CU) students. Many extracurricular activities are organized by ISC to provide opportunities for friendship, understanding, and social interactions. The club organizes activities based on student interest and works with other CU International Clubs to bring Czech and international students together.

Flat Buddies

CIEE both recruits and trains a group of local Charles University students who live with CIEE students in apartments as well as the dormitory. These Flat Buddies share day-to-day issues, help CIEE students to better understand local cultural norms and standards, and assist students with immersion into the Czech culture and Charles University student life. These local students also help CIEE Prague staff with orientation, social events, and activities throughout the semester.

Interest Groups

Interest groups help smaller groups of students become more integrated into Prague culture and society. These groups include: politics, economy, and society; sport; film and theater; music; and art. All of these groups include Czech students.

Excursions

The program includes a number of excursions and site visits to locations in and around the city. Within Prague you could visit:

  • Karlin – A neighborhood illustrating patterns of gentrification from the centre into the suburbs. Close to the city center, almost all its former industries were destroyed and empty brownfields are waiting for new development.
  • The Docs of Liben: A very beautiful part of the city on the river. Amazing natural corridor mixed with old port structures.
  • Little Hanoi: The largest Asian market in Prague

Overnight Excursions

Brno
The second largest Czech city, a socially and economically shrinking city, undergoing serious reconstruction and renovations.

Ostrava
The Czech Republic’s third largest city is a former mining and industrial center looking for a new identity as it changes its working, social demography.

Bratislava
Home to beautiful river corridors and an active, creative community of artists and architects.

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Academics

Academics

The Global Architecture and Design curriculum in Prague consists of three main components: the Future Cities Design Studio; a seminar; and science, engineering, and technology workshops. Students may opt to take a CIEE elective course. Courses will be taught in English by CIEE-contracted faculty who will also facilitate collaborative projects with local professionals and peers. Field trips to visit historical sites, new buildings, and environmental initiatives enhance students’ understanding of “cities in transition.”

Academic Culture

Utilizing an approach that is both interdependent and interdisciplinary, students are encouraged to inquire, debate, collaborate, conduct experiments, and rethink the potential of today’s architects and designers. The aim is to develop a language of technological design that can create immediacy between individual responsibility and the current global environmental crisis. Environmental problems are a crisis of human alienation from the natural world, and the initiative explores ways in which design can alleviate this unfortunate separation. What is required to comprehend globality today is a close study of specific places, cities and cultures. In order to create an educational experience that breeds cosmopolitanism, Global Architecture and Design in Prague works with elements of history and tradition just as it takes full advantage of new technologies and the opportunities of global exchange.

Nature of Classes

All courses are available to both CIEE and ARCHIP students.

Language of Instruction

English

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Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

All Courses

Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be canceled due to insufficient enrollment.

CIEE Study Center Syllabi

To view the most recent syllabi for courses taught by CIEE at our Study Centers, visit our syllabi site.

Future Cities Design Studio

Living Urban Infrastructure
Using Prague as a laboratory, the studio will rethink what is salubrious about the city, in both its forms and its life. The design investigations will be based on one illuminating hypothesis: in the future, cities will grow to be self-sufficient in their critical necessities through massive public works and infrastructural support. The studio will explore the effects of technological interventions that can have profound impacts on the planet as a whole. The chief directives will be the shrewd intersection between technology and urbanism, especially under the rubric of ecology.

Urban Precedence
In 2002, Prague has suffered extreme damage from record high levels of its river Vltava. The historic center of the city was surged with water and the ruinous aftermath of the flooding left city officials with no other options but to design temporary gates as an emergency defense system. The proposed metal walls are then quickly installed along the banks before the volume of river rose. Luckily, during most recent flooding, the defense system provided decent protection in the old center. However, the system is only functional to a certain capacity, and it still left other areas of the city under water.

Historically, river Vltava has played a fundamental role in the development of Prague. It provided water and a means of navigation for the early settlements established along its banks. It was also used to power mills and industry in the city. To tame the river and make it easier to navigate, eight dams, a large canal and several weirs were constructed during 20th century. Nevertheless, even with its strong appearance on the urban fabric, Vltava is considered generally inaccessible and unreachable along most of its length throughout Prague. Surprisingly, recent floods made Vltava contextually more present in the city and visible for inhabitants. It also made a dramatic transformation of the city's infrastructure and changed the typical behavior of pedestrians and traffic commuters. ONE Lab Prague will use the opportunity that emerged from these events and study the rapid reshaping of urban context and propose new solutions for Amphibious-Based Architecture and Transmutable Urbanism.

The Site
There are many sites along the river, which have particular value to the city and at the same time are influential for their surrounding context. They are a meeting place for local neighborhoods, and destination points for many tourists and residents of Prague. However, with every new flooding, these attractive locations become evacuated and sealed off, directly transforming local environment and infrastructure. One such location is Kampa, an island sitting bellow the famous Charles Bridge in the historical district known as Lesser Town. Unlike other islands on Vltava, Kampa is separated from Lesser Town by a narrow artificial channel to the west called the Devil's Stream, a waterway originally dug to power water mills. Besides the Charles Bridge, the north tip of the island is hosting medieval residential buildings, governmental offices and restaurants. The south half of Kampa has a large park and a wellknown Museum of Art sitting on the very edge of water. The studio will be focusing on the Museum and its relationship with land and water. During every flood the museum has to move its collection to higher floors and is unreachable for weeks after the flood. Therefore, students will address this problem by proposing a new redesign and extension of the current building while at the same time working with the landscape and incorporating flood barriers that will question current water protection system and be a novel example for future anti-inundation mechanisms.

Methodology
Through intensive research and design, the Future Cities Design Studio will navigate with two objectives: first, on a large scale, to investigate how the current riverbed can be remodelled and aggrandized deeper into the existing matrix of the city. Students will design and simulate new river tissues with increased capacity for higher water volumes, and propose river edges better connected with local neighborhoods. The second objective is to focus on a specific site along Vltava through existing or newly proposed architectural typology, whilst dealing with local context and flood protection system. Within design process, the studio will explore current and future technologies of flood barriers, study water defense systems in nature, rethink typology, and finally, emerge with new ideas for amphibious buildings.

In reaching the goals, the studio will deploy computational tools within the realm of digital design. Students will use Autodesk Maya for topological, parametric and animation-based 3D modeling and Rhinoceros for 2D drafting. Software will be learned through small studio workshop sessions, and through project designs with case studies related to general theme. Other advance tools, such as Processing for data visualization, and Ecotect or Rhino Grasshopper for environmental simulations and fabrication, will be explored through more intensive science-, engineering- and technology-related workshops. There will be an interchangeable process and active outcome travelling between the design studio and the technology workshops.

In order to achieve coherent, diverse and conclusive results, students will be group into several teams. Groups will commence the program with the research related to a specific topic and explore vernacular conditions. Further, teams will experiment with urban tissue and generate variations of networks for an expanded riverbed. These results will be presented in a large-scale physical model with mapping projections showcasing the material of the teams. Finally, each group will produce a more developed and detailed design of their site-specific projects. A jury will evaluate and discuss the concept, technological principles, and ecological footprint of the proposals. The projects will be formulated and communicated in diagrams, drawings, renderings and a physical model.

Future Cities Seminar

Future Cities : City and water
At the beginning of 21st century the side-effects of globalization, new industrialization and rapid development of third-world countries are often being manifested as catastrophic impacts on environment we live in. The latest statistics are showing 53% of world population living in the cities and 65 percent of fresh water being drained from natural surrounding of North America and Europe only due to intense agriculture. However, most of the society tangled in the digital network of daily lives, is not directly feeling the consequences of decreasing water levels, despite the fact that there is only 15% of Earth's inhabitants currently not threatened by water shortage. Furthermore, there are natural disasters and forces in form of flooding, heavy rain or extreme drought which are reshaping infrastructure, changing both urban and rural fabrics, destroying historical cores of cities, disrupting entire ecosystems, and inevitably destabilizing local economy.

Despite these problems, a new revolution is emerging from cross-disciplinary collaboration between creative industry and research laboratories. Architects and designers are working with marine biologists, mechanical engineers and other scientists on projects or technologies revolving around alternative, renewable energies and sustainable living. The projects are ranging from concepts that can be build or applied even today to speculative scenarios for future cities we will occupy in even greater numbers. As Global Architecture and Design program is structured around sustainable design in the intersection between technology and urbanism., the Future Cities Seminar in Prague will be analysing, studying and conducting research on relationship between city and water, in both global and local scale.

Methodology
Future Cities Seminar is organized in five 1-day research blocks, each focusing on different topic relative to the program and brief of Future Cities Design Studio. Through lectures we will examine the context on both artificial and natural islands, public spaces and water, program and typology, and look into more extreme examples of ''Hydro-cities'' and land reclaim projects in Gulf region, Asia and Africa. We will also browse through 20th century inventions, architectural engineering and structural designs developed by Frei Otto, Oscar Niemeyer and other prominent visionaries of last hundred years. The seminar will have provocative approach on various issues and seek for radical thinking in solving problems such is the large "plastic stain" floating as a garbage island in the centre of Pacific Ocean and its potential to be harvested for energy rather than further polluting coast land. These lectures will be followed by group work where students will map river islands in selected cities, make comparison in sizes and types of interrelation between water and city, and analyse existing flood protection systems. The outcome should serve as both theoretical and practical background and research for the project developed within Global AD Future Cities Design Studio.

Science, Engineering and Technology Workshops

Computation-based Tools in Design
Computation is defined as information processing; such information might manifest itself in several forms (energy, matter, 3D models, encoded data). The general scope is to have access and be able to manage and instrumentalize complexity in design. Computation-based tools help establish an information-based infrastructure that allows complex information to be incorporated in design objects and processes as well as to flow seamlessly within the design workflow. Tools establish a dialogue in the process of translating non-architectural problems into architectural responses (space, material, structure, affects). We can boil down their possible scopes to two main kinds: problem solving and exploration. The first one is aimed with a clear focus on its goal; the second one starts from certain conditions but is open-ended. Either way the minimization of effort is a common search criteria to embed efficiency in the design process, though it doesn't always become a general driver. The ecosystemic call for a more heterogeneous landscape of solutions induces the search for less standardized approaches and processes, therefore the possibility to craft own instruments and processes that can manage greater complexity (accessing a broader field of possibilities and opportunities by increasing the complexity in information processing through computation) becomes an irreducible part of the design problem. Computation-based tools and designers become part of the design environment, considering the designer as a sophisticated computing device which is part of the process: its relations with tools changes form the figure of a puppeteer to a specie in an ecosystem of objects. Tools become orienting devices in the exploration of an unknown territory; it's all about automation and control: the designer decides what pattern of distribution will decision have in the creative process, if advocate it all to himself or distribute it (partially or completely) to the material system, computational system or other automated processes.

Throughout the whole design process, computation is the common substrate, the connective tissue that allows the more or less seamless flow of information from one aspect to the next, from analysis to design to fabrication, allowing the establishment of iterations, non-linear links between different phases and the implementation of custom processes. More specifically, and with relations with the actual design task, here are outlined the main opportunities of the use of computation based tools in the different steps of the design process tackled in two workshops:

1st Workshop: Environmental Sensibilities

  • Purpose: Environmental simulation - Using environmental data as a substrate (or playground) for design decisions and testing their potential feedbacks.
  • Tools: Rhinoceros, Grasshopper + Ecotect with gEco plug-in

    Grasshopper is a visual scripting plug-in for Rhinoceros (3D NURBS CAD). It's a data processor with a visual, easy-to-grasp interface; working on top of a 3D CAD it has the possibility to translate data into geometry, allowing to analyze it and generate data driven ones. Since its structure is based on parameters it has been naturally associated with parametric design. Its flexibility and extensibility granted by its community of contributors expanded its range of application from concept design to project engineering, making it the weapon of choice of many architecture and engineering firms. This workshop will introduce students to its structure, its logic, data management (with import-export from other platforms), basic geometry generation and properties as well as focusing on how to acquire and manage relevant environmental information such as solar energy accumulated on surfaces, terrain analysis, slant and simulation of flooding descent paths.

2nd Workshop: Algorithm 2 Fabrication

  • Purpose: Design to fabrication
  • Tools: Rhinoceros, Grasshopper + other fabrication-specific plug-ins
    • Tools shorten the path between idea and realization, including fab and material processes form the beginning in the design tool.
    • Fabrication becomes a design constraint within the whole process, not just a translation of a rendered image but a whole territory rich in opportunities and qualities. Tools help exploring and incorporating such opportunities in the architectural design process, with the possibility to link the design to economic and feasibility parameters.

This workshop will focus on the steps that bring from the design in the digital realm to its physical realization through numerically-controlled machines. Fabrication is an important part of the design process and will be watched as an opportunity in that regard, beyond the notion of a digital perfection that should be considered as an ideal finalization. Students will learn how to talk to machines and feed them the information they need to operate, understanding concepts such as geometry analysis, relation with material and construction logics (discretization, components, connections and how these parts might be fused together), machine constraints (and how to exploit them as creative opportunities), tolerance and approximation. They will also understand the importance of a fab plan (components, stripes, etc.), tagging and recognition of components relations.

CIEE Elective Courses

Art and Architecture of Prague
This course provides a survey of art and architecture, especially housing styles, which have influenced the development of Prague and other major European cities from the Middle Ages through the 20th century. Excursions to art galleries and related architectural monuments are combined with classroom lectures.

Collective Identity in a Totalitarian Regime
This course examines the totalitarian oppression from the point of view of ordinary citizens in socialist Czechoslovakia. It focuses on the construction of collective mentality through everyday official/public and unofficial/private activities, including mass parades, ceremonies and performances, work relations, children’s education, housing schemes, or collective vacationing. The goal is to demonstrate the consequences of life in an oppressive regime: suppression of fundamental forms of civic interaction, such as independent public communication, and distortion of moral and behavioral norms.

ENVI 3001 PRAG

European Environmental Studies
This course examines the relationship between human society and the natural environment with a specific focus on the Czech landscape as a place for human-nature interaction. In addition the course explores European integration from an environmental perspective, the ecological footprint and problem of climate change, and environmental ethics in contemporary European society.

CEAS 3004 PRAG / COMM 3001 PRAG

Media Impact in Central Europe: Past and Present
This course examines the role and impact of international and domestic media on political developments in Central Europe, examining the way of doing journalism at Prague-based Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, and comparing it to the approaches of other media companies. The course looks at journalism, technology, and logistics used by RFE/RL during the Cold War, and at its current ways of providing information to areas of the world where the press is restricted or tightly controlled. Journalists from RFE/RL and other media are frequent guest speakers. A key aspect of the course is the focus on coverage of religious, ethnic, and other emotionally sensitive issues, and students gain special insights into coverage of current events. They learn about the dynamics of social tensions in transitional and post-communist societies, and how the media is contributing to shaping the history of countries faced with their legacy and with the new challenges of EU membership.

AHIS 3003 PRAG

Modern Czech Art
Combining classroom lectures with gallery visits, this course acquaints students with 20th century art movements and tendencies. Based upon the analysis of the oeuvre of key Czech artists and various topics, ranging from the expressions of Czech national identity in the finde-siecle art to the art produced under the Communist regime, the course tackles the social and political development of the Central European region. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

COMM 3301 PRAG

Intercultural Communication and Leadership
In this class, participants will develop skills, knowledge, and understanding that will help them communicate and engage more appropriately and effectively in Prague as well as in other intercultural contexts. Students will explore various topics in intercultural communication in the context of their experience abroad, and will practice intercultural learning processes that they can apply when working across difference in a wide variety of contexts. Participants will increase their own cultural self-awareness and develop personal leadership skills to help them become more effective in an interdependent world. Learning will involve in-class exercises, active reflection, discussion, readings, field reports, short lectures, and out-of-class activities that engage students in the local culture on a deeper level.
Contact hours: 42. Recommended credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

CIEE Language Courses

Beginning Czech Language, I
Beginning Czech Language, II (Academic Year students in spring semester)
Beginning Czech Language, Fast Track
Intermediate Czech Language, I
Intermediate Czech Language, II (Academic Year students in spring semester)
Advanced Czech Language, I

These courses provide students with the basic skills needed to communicate on a daily basis, including grammar, conversation, listening, and reading comprehension. During the first two weeks, students study Czech language five hours each day. Students then continue language study with classes two days per week. Students are placed into classes based on language background.
Contact hours: 115. Recommended credit: 4 semester/6 quarter hours.

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