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By Term

  • Spring Block I 2017
  • Spring Blocks I, II 2017
  • Spring Blocks I, II, III 2017
  • Spring Block II 2017
  • Spring Blocks II, III 2017
  • Spring Block III 2017
  • Fall Block I 2017
  • Fall Blocks I, II 2017
  • Fall Blocks I, II, III 2017
  • Fall Block II 2017
  • Fall Blocks II, III 2017
  • Fall Block III 2017
  • Spring Block I 2018
  • Spring Blocks I, II 2018
  • Spring Blocks I, II, III 2018
  • Spring Block II 2018
  • Spring Blocks II, III 2018
  • Spring Block III 2018
  • OC Academic Year 2017-2018
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Study Abroad in Berlin
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Program Overview

Program Overview

We’re pleased to offer semester pricing for Open Campus programs starting at $6,850. CIEE is committed to preparing global citizens for today’s workforce and tackling the barriers that prevent students from studying abroad. Providing affordable programs is key to these efforts, and supports our pledge to Generation Study Abroad™.

Customize your study abroad experience. Our Open Campus program at the CIEE Global Institute – Berlin offers maximum flexibility to engage and experience Berlin in your own way. Match the academic experience with your interests, aspirations, and degree requirements: Take one, two, or three six-week blocks for your perfect amount of intensive study and cultural engagement; select your academic track from five options; then choose from a wide range of courses and subject areas.

In Berlin, no matter how you build your program, you’ll surround yourself with the language, culture, and people of the vibrant, international Kreuzberg district – a hub for the arts, music, and digital technology. The campus consists of a newly renovated former factory, state-of-the-art classrooms, and opportunities to get involved in activities and interest groups designed to connect you with the local community. Plus, you’ll get out and learn more about Berlin, Germany, and Europe up close during integrated excursions and study tours.

Students can also opt to combine locations across the four CIEE Open Campus locations – in Berlin, London, Paris, and Rome – to create a truly individualized study abroad experience.

Download the brochure

CREATE YOUR PERFECT STUDY ABROAD EXPERIENCE

Select courses from five academic tracks:*


  • Language, Literature & Culture – Build your German language skills and discover the fascinating cultures found in Berlin, Germany, and Europe as you absorb Berlin’s architectural masterpieces and world-class arts scenes. Some courses are available in both English and German, so you can combine language-learning with discipline-centered content.
  • Business – Germany is Europe’s economic powerhouse, and its capital city is the largest hub for tech start-ups, making Berlin a prime spot to investigate the new demands and strategies of global business.
  • Communications, Journalism & New Media – Home to more than 1,000 film and television production companies, Berlin leads the way in European communications. Coursework, fieldwork, and site visits offer revealing insight into the role and power of media today.
  • Global and Community Health – See how Germany and the European Union are addressing major health care challenges in a combination of courses and fieldwork with faculty from renowned institutions and research centers.
  • International Relations & Political Science –Germany – a leading voice in European and world affairs – is an ideal place to examine the pressing challenges facing Europe today and their impact on every corner of the globe.

*You will be prompted to choose an optional track as part of your application; you can also select “no preference: multi-disciplinary.” Regardless of selected track, you can choose your courses from among all offered courses (unless your home university has other requirements). Study Tours and Academic Projects are designed to align with track themes.

Enroll in one, two or three 6-week blocks:

The Open Campus Program teaches full semester-length classes on a six-week academic block system, which allows for courses taught in an accelerated, intensive format. Students should be prepared for fast paced courses and to gain benefit fromfor a more focused academic experience with longer class sessions. You must take two courses per block, a full-time course load. One course can be an Academic Project (internship, service learning project, or independent research) and integrated seminar. Choose one, two or three academic blocks during either the fall or spring semester. Each block is six weeks long, and can be combined with blocks in the Open Campus program in Rome, London or Paris.

Stay in Berlin – or combine locations

Stay in Berlin for the duration of your study abroad – or add on blocks in other CIEE Open Campus locations in London, Paris, and Rome to experience more intercultural learning in Europe with CIEE’s unique Global Scholar program.

Global Scholars are students who combine sessions in the Open Campus programs in Berlin, London, Paris, or Rome. To amplify and maximize the academic benefits of multi-location learning, all Global Scholars must participate in Global Scholars Online (GSO), a virtual course. GSO will support your learning objectives at multiple CIEE Global Institutes. It will help you connect with peers, make sense of cultural differences, and transition among host cultures.

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Scholarships & Grants

Scholarships & Grants

We want as many students as possible to benefit from studying abroad. That’s why CIEE awards more than $5 million every year – more than any other international educational organization – to make study abroad affordable.

Applicants to this program are eligible for the following scholarships and grants:

  • Ping Scholarships for Academic Excellence
  • Ping Scholarships for Academic Excellence

    $2,500 toward program costs. To recognize high academic achievement, CIEE offers a limited number of merit scholarships to our strongest students. These awards are based on students’ academic records, and on the submission of a personal essay describing to us how their CIEE program will impact their college experience and future career plans.

    https://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/scholarships-grants/

  • Global Access Initiative (GAIN) Grants
  • Global Access Initiative (GAIN) Grants

    The GAIN Grant helps cover airfare costs to and from CIEE program locations for students who demonstrate high financial need. GAIN Grants are available for short-term (January and summer), semester and year-long CIEE programs.

    https://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/scholarships-grants/

  • CIEE Gilman Go Global Grant
  • CIEE Gilman Go Global Grant

    Applicants for the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship can apply for the CIEE Gilman Go Global Grant, which provides both program cost support and support for airfare. Students will have to provide proof of having applied to the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship, upon request.

    https://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/scholarships-grants/

To be considered, submit the CIEE Scholarships & Grants application within your CIEE program application. Learn more at the Scholarships & Grants section of our website.
Apply now

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The CIEE Difference

The CIEE Difference

GLOBAL INSTITUTE CAMPUS

Learn in the heart of one of Berlin’s liveliest and culturally rich districts. Live with other CIEE students in a spacious residence hall featuring en-suite rooms, fully outfitted kitchens, laundry facilities, and comfortable lounges. The lower floors of the residence offer quiet study areas, a café, and other common space to do coursework and get to know your fellow students. Students in the residence hall may opt to live in the German language section that offers additional, optional language-learning activities.

Just steps away from the residential rooms are peaceful inner courtyards, modern classrooms, and the Student Life Office, where students will get advice on local events and volunteer opportunities and can borrow recreational and sports equipment.

A limited number of students may be housed in homestays or shared apartments.

ACADEMIC PROJECTS

Gain academic credit while working outside the classroom with an optional CIEE Academic Project and the required seminar. Choose from three options, based on your academic track/disciplinary focus, qualifications, and learning goals:

  • CIEE Academic Internship – Build new skills and intercultural competence, and become an active member of the Berlin professional environment by going behind the scenes at a local business or organization
  • CIEE Directed Research – Pursue a research project of your own design incorporating independent, local field work
  • CIEE Service-Learning Project – Combine course-based learning with practical, relevant project experience to meet a community-defined need.

Academic partners in the past have included organizations such as the Berlin Partner, the Berlinale Film Festival, National Public Radio Berlin, the U.S. Embassy Foreign Commercial Service, and others.

Academic partners in the past have included organizations such as Berlin Partner, the Berlinale Film Festival, NPR Berlin, the U.S. Embassy Foreign Commercial Service, and others.To be eligible to participate in an Academic Project, students must be in Berlin for at least two consecutive blocks; Academic Projects are offered only in blocks 2 and 3. Additional restrictions and application requirements apply.

STUDY TOURS

Each academic block features a two-night, three-day study -tour to a different region of Germany or a neighboring country. Tours are designed around the themes of the academic tracks. For example, learn how Germany keeps its edge in high-tech manufacturing at Volkswagen’s factory in Dresden, explore the prison experience under Nazi Germany and Soviet occupation in the Czech Republic, or visit Europe’s largest real estate development project, the HafenCity, in Hamburg. Study -tour locations and content vary by academic block.

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Dates, Deadlines & Fees

Dates, Deadlines & Fees

We want to make sure you get the most out of your experience when you study abroad with CIEE, which is why we offer the most inclusions in our fees.

  • Tuition and housing
  • Pre-departure advising and optional on-site airport meet and greet
  • Full-time program leadership and support
  • Field trips and cultural activities
  • CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits
Please note, program dates are subject to change. Please contact your CIEE Study Abroad Advisor before purchasing airfare. Click the button to view more detailed information about dates and fees as well as estimated additional costs. Please talk with your University Study Abroad Advisor about additional fees that may be charged by your home institution when participating in a program abroad.
Program
Application Due
Start Date
End Date
Costs
Spring Block I 2017 (6 wks)
11/01/2016
01/09/2017
02/18/2017
$6,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$4,908
Housing ***
$1,475
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$900
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$135
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$950

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring Blocks I, II 2017 (12 wks)
11/01/2016
01/09/2017
04/01/2017
$12,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$9,433
Housing ***
$2,950
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,800
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$270
Books & Supplies
$200
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$1,900

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring Blocks I, II, III 2017 (18 wks)
11/01/2016
01/09/2017
05/13/2017
$17,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$12,958
Housing ***
$4,425
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$2,700
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$405
Books & Supplies
$300
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$2,850

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring Block II 2017 (6 wks)
12/01/2016
02/20/2017
04/01/2017
$6,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$4,908
Housing ***
$1,475
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$900
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$135
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$950

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring Blocks II, III 2017 (12 wks)
12/01/2016
02/20/2017
05/13/2017
$12,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$9,433
Housing ***
$2,950
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,800
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$270
Books & Supplies
$200
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$1,900

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring Block III 2017 (6 wks)
01/01/2017
04/03/2017
05/13/2017
$6,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$4,908
Housing ***
$1,475
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$900
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$135
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$950

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Fall Block I 2017 (6 wks)
05/15/2017
08/14/2017
09/23/2017
$6,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$4,908
Housing ***
$1,475
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$900
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$135
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$950

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Fall Blocks I, II 2017 (12 wks)
05/15/2017
08/14/2017
11/04/2017
$12,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$9,433
Housing ***
$2,950
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,800
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$270
Books & Supplies
$200
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$1,900

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Fall Blocks I, II, III 2017 (18 wks)
05/15/2017
08/14/2017
12/16/2017
$17,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$12,958
Housing ***
$4,425
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$2,700
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$405
Books & Supplies
$300
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$2,850

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Fall Block II 2017 (6 wks)
05/15/2017
09/25/2017
11/04/2017
$6,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$4,908
Housing ***
$1,475
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$900
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$135
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$950

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Fall Blocks II, III 2017 (12 wks)
05/15/2017
09/25/2017
12/16/2017
$12,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$9,433
Housing ***
$2,950
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,800
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$270
Books & Supplies
$200
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$1,900

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Fall Block III 2017 (6 wks)
06/01/2017
11/06/2017
12/16/2017
$6,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$4,908
Housing ***
$1,475
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$900
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$135
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$950

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring Block I 2018 (6 wks)
11/01/2017
01/08/2018
02/17/2018
$6,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$4,908
Housing ***
$1,475
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$900
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$135
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$950

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring Blocks I, II 2018 (12 wks)
11/01/2017
01/08/2018
03/31/2018
$12,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$9,433
Housing ***
$2,950
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,800
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$270
Books & Supplies
$200
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$1,900

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring Blocks I, II, III 2018 (18 wks)
11/01/2017
01/08/2018
05/12/2018
$17,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$12,958
Housing ***
$4,425
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$2,700
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$405
Books & Supplies
$300
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$2,850

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring Block II 2018 (6 wks)
11/01/2017
02/19/2018
03/31/2018
$6,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$4,908
Housing ***
$1,475
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$900
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$135
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$950

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring Blocks II, III 2018 (12 wks)
11/01/2017
02/19/2018
05/12/2018
$12,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$9,433
Housing ***
$2,950
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,800
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$270
Books & Supplies
$200
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$1,900

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring Block III 2018 (6 wks)
12/01/2017
04/02/2018
05/12/2018
$6,850

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$4,908
Housing ***
$1,475
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$900
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation
$135
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$950

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
OC Academic Year 2017-2018 (39 wks)
05/15/2017
08/14/2017
05/12/2018
$32,300

Program Date Notes

Dates for this program are provided as tentative dates. Please consult with your study abroad advisor to confirm dates before purchasing your flights.

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$14,133
Housing ***
$17,700
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$8,100
International Airfare **
$2,900
Local Transportation
$1,215
Books & Supplies
$900
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$8,550
Expenses during break ***
$900

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $360 per Block for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

*** academic year students who wish to stay onsite are responsible for arranging their housing and meals during the semester break

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Eligibility
2.5 Overall GPA

Eligibility

  • Overall GPA 2.5
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Recommended Credit

Recommended Credit

Students enroll in two courses per academic block, for 6 semester / 9 quarter credits for one block, 12 semester / 18 quarter credits for two blocks, or 18 semester / 27 quarter credits for three blocks.

Each course is 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours, unless otherwise noted. CIEE Academic Projects are approximately 100-120 total hours of field-based work/internship, service-learning, or independent research hours, plus 15 seminar hours and meetings with CIEE faculty advisors, for 3 semester / 4.5 quarter credits.

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Program Requirements

Program Requirements

Students participating in the Open Campus program may select an academic track during the application process and enroll in one, two, or all three six-week academic blocks per semester; students may also attend for the full academic year. Students must enroll in two courses per academic block. Due to the intensive nature of the Block system, two courses per block is a full-time academic load. All students are required to maintain full-time status.

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About the City

About The City

The thriving global city of Berlin has been built over centuries around the River Spree. Home to nearly 3.5 million people, it's a place of vigorous growth and change. As the capital of Germany, business and governmental decisions made in Berlin reverberate through the European Union and the world. Berlin houses countless small start-up businesses, with growing communications, life sciences, environmental services, media and music, and digital sectors. As a result of reasonable living costs, excellent public transportation, and immediate local access to parks and playgrounds, Berlin is ranked among the top of global urban quality-of-life indices. It offers locals and visitors alike a multitude of universities, research institutes, orchestras, museums, festivals, and historical landmarks to explore.

KREUZBERG DISTRICT

Berlin is a city of districts and neighborhoods. The CIEE Global Institute is in the heart of Kreuzberg, known for its energy, young, international population, food, colorful shops, street festivals, and lively cultural life. Many landmarks are nearby, including Checkpoint Charlie, the Jewish Museum, and Berlin’s historic “Mitte” district. It’s an easy trip to central Berlin by subway: the station is right in front of the Global Institute. In addition, students are just a 10-minute bike ride from the expansive oasis of Tempelhof, the former airport of Berlin Air-Lift fame and now a giant urban park.

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Meet The Staff

Meet The Staff

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Marie Budde, MA

Program Coordinator

Marie is part of the Community and Student Life team at the Global Institute—Berlin. Marie has worked in international education for several years, most recently at the Berlin School of Creative Leadership, where she served as academic program manager. She has also worked with international students at the Freie Universität in Berlin. Marie holds an MA from the Brandenburgische Technische Universität in Cottbus, and a BA from the Royal Holloway University of London.

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Herbert Genzmer, PhD

Core Faculty - Language, Literature, and Culture Track

Herbert Genzmer was born in Krefeld and studied at the Universities of Berlin (FU), Düsseldorf, Cologne, and Berkeley, where he earned his doctorate in linguistics. He has taught at Berkeley and at Georgetown University in Texas. In addition to teaching, Herbert has published books on German grammar (Hören, Sprechen, Lesen, Schreiben – Unsere Grammatik, 2014), as well as various works of fiction and non-fiction, such as the novel Das perfekte Spiel (2012).

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Eric Ginola, PhD

Program Assistant and Core Faculty

Having grown up in the Chicago area and completed his undergraduate degree at Macalester College, Eric went on to complete his graduate work at the University of Washington-Seattle, where he gained his first exposure to working in international education. Beside teaching at the UW, Eric has also taught at Gettysburg College, the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität in Münster and the Universität Paderborn. He teaches a variety of courses in the Language, Literature and Culture track but the majority of his responsibilities fall under the realm of Community and Student Life, including the study tours, extracurricular activities, day-to-day assistance with various student concerns, and various other roles.

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Martin Kley, PhD

Director, Global Institute - Berlin

Martin oversees the coordination, quality, and planning of all courses and educational programing in Berlin. He is responsible for faculty staffing, finalization of syllabi, the course evaluation process, and program development. A native of Augsburg, Germany, Martin studied at the Universities of Augsburg, Pittsburgh and Texas, where he earned his doctorate in German studies. Martin taught German language and culture, as well as film studies, at Gettysburg College. At Gettysburg he also served as chair of the German Department.

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Stephanie Levy, MA

Academic Internship Council Berlin Director

As AIC Director, Stephanie is responsible for placing students in meaningful and productive Academic Projects in Berlin. She has lived and worked in Germany for more than 20 years. During that time, Stephanie organized and presented cultural and foreign language workshops and seminars for a variety of organizations and institutions in Berlin, Munich, and Hong Kong. Most recently, she developed and led her own online learning programs for creative business with participants from more than 50 countries. Stephanie holds MAs from the Universität der Künste in Berlin and the University of Tennessee, where she also earned her BFA.

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Bettina Pohle, PhD

Core Faculty - Language, Literature, and Culture

Bettina has been an enthusiastic and passionate teacher for 25 years, looking back on a broad canon of professional experience in the academic teaching of German and English literature, and of German culture, history and language, (DaF) both in the U.S. and in Germany. Bettina studied German and English literature at the Freie Universität in Berlin and subsequently studied and taught at the University of Georgia and at the University of California at Berkeley, from which she earned a PhD in German literature. During her 12 years in the U.S., Bettina taught at UC Berkeley and various other institutions, among them the University of Santa Cruz and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. During her time at UC Berkeley, Bettina also worked as a consultant in the Teaching & Resource Center of the University and was responsible for campus-wide TA training.

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John Roper, PhD

Academic Director

John Roper earned a bachelor’s degree in history and German studies from Brown University. As an undergraduate, he studied abroad in Berlin and upon graduation worked for several years as a study abroad advisor in the Brown Office of International Programs. John earned his doctorate in history from the University of Pennsylvania, returning to Berlin to complete his dissertation research with a grant from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). His dissertation focused on early debates within the nascent gay rights movement in Germany at the turn of the twentieth century. He has taught at the Europa-Universität Viadrina in Frankfurt (Oder) and Touro College Berlin. Since summer 2014, John has taught courses at CIEE focusing on German cultural history, art and architecture, as well as gender and sexuality in contemporary Germany.

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Maren Specht

Student Services Manager

Maren received her degree in German and Italian Literature and History of Art (M.A.) from the Free University of Berlin. She studied abroad in Siena, Italy, on Socrates Erasmus Scholarship. After working with students at the European Information Center Berlin, she joined the CIEE in 2011. She brings a wealth of knowledge about Berlin and Germany to CIEE students and manages student services, including course enrollment, registration, visa processing and on-site student information.

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Donna Swarthout

Core Faculty – Business Track and Communications, Journalism and New Media Track

Donna Swarthout completed her M.A. and doctoral exams at the University of California Berkeley in the field of political science. Before moving to Berlin in 2010, she taught in the Political Science Department, College of Business, and Honors College at Montana State University. Besides teaching for CIEE, she has taught in the Berlin Perspectives Program at the Humboldt-Universität and at the Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft Berlin.

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Kirsten Twelbeck, PhD

Community and Student Life Director

Kirsten is responsible for student experiential learning opportunities, including residential programming, events, external projects, and programs with the greater Berlin community. She also works with the Academic Director to further develop our programs and teaches regularly. Kirsten earned her PhD in American Studies and successfully passed the post-doctoral Habilitation. She studied American Studies (both literature and culture) and Theater and Drama in Erlangen, Berlin, and Bloomington, Indiana, and has worked as an assistant professor and a guest professor at several German universities before joining the staff at CIEE. Prior to her academic career she worked as a journalist for German radio stations and as head of divisions for the city marketing organization Berlin Partner.

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Where You'll Study

Where You'll Study

The CIEE Global Institute – Berlin combines the best of both worlds: a U.S.-style residence life program integrated within a local German neighborhood. Located in the heart of the Kreuzberg district, one of the most vibrant and popular neighborhoods in Berlin, the campus offers students easy access to a large public market hall, restaurants and cafés, and a variety of shops.

Our cutting-edge facility combines the architectural charm of an old German factory with modern design elements. The CIEE Global Institute campus features a residence hall, large common areas, two courtyards, a café, multiple study areas and lounges, and other rooms designed to enhance the interaction between all students and staff members living in the facility. A specific section of the facility is designated as the “German language wing” to help foster a stronger commitment to language learning and cultural exchange. Wireless Internet is available throughout the facility, and access to the residence is carefully controlled through both on-site security staff and electronic keys.

The CIEE Global Institute also houses our Student Life Office, where students can get guidance and support in order to get the most out of their study abroad experience. At the SLO, students can also borrow recreational equipment, get advice from CIEE staff and local student “Buddies” on local restaurants and stores, concerts, art exhibits, and performances.

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Housing & Meals

Housing & Meals

Most students live in an on-campus residence hall with a mix of CIEE students and resident assistants (RAs). Our RAs are local students who help CIEE students adjust to life in Berlin and are responsible for their safety and security.

Students live in double, triple, or quad rooms with en-suite bathrooms and shower facilities. Students can prepare their own meals in the full kitchens. CIEE provides basic cooking utensils and cleaning supplies. Students also may get coffee, tea, soft drinks, and snacks and sandwiches at the on-site café, or explore the myriad restaurants in the Kreuzberg neighborhood. Lounges and kitchens in the residence hall allow students to mix and mingle over meals, cultural activities, study groups, and special events. Lounges and kitchens are shared space, with students enjoying the benefits but also the responsibility of taking care of them. Larger common areas are on the ground floor and inner courtyards offer comfortable spaces to work and relax.

A limited number of homestays may be available for students, with preference given to those whose universities require living with a local family; this must be indicated when applying. Students who live with homestay families receive breakfast and dinner daily. Students may also be housed in shared apartments. Final housing assignments are solely at the discretion of CIEE.

WEEKEND HOMESTAYS
Even students living in our new residence hall can experience a weekend homestay with a local German family. In this way, students experience the traditions and daily rituals of German life with local Berliners!

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Orientations

Orientations

Students begin their study abroad experience in Berlin before they leave home with our online pre-departure orientation to help them understand more about the program and address important logistical questions about arrival and the first days on site. CIEE resident staff members meet with students online and share information about the program and site, as well as the chance to ask questions.

A multi-day, on-site orientation at the beginning of each academic block is a required element of the program and introduces students to Berlin, German society and culture, and the CIEE academic program. Participants will also get practical information on living in Germany, and Berlin in particular. Excursions in and around the city introduce students to the public transit system and showcase major points of interest, resources, and amenities.

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Internet

Internet

Students should bring wireless-enabled laptops for academic writing and research. Wireless Internet is available throughout the CIEE Global Institute-Berlin.

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Culture

Culture

LANGUAGE IMMERSION

All CIEE students, regardless of language abilities, have the opportunity to learn German. Courses at a variety of proficiency levels are available, and more advanced German speakers can take advantage of German-taught area studies courses. A specific section of the Global Institute residence is designated at the “German language wing" to help foster a stronger commitment to language learning and cultural exchange.

Living in Berlin provides you with the unique opportunity to learn about Germany by learning German in Berlin. Seize that opportunity and you will find that it will make your experience abroad so much richer and deeper.

EXCURSIONS AND STUDY OURS

CIEE students in all academic tracks visit numerous significant locations in Berlin each block to underscore and expand on in-class lessons. Instructors lead detailed discussions preceding the visits and debriefing sessions afterward to encourage students to synthesize and reflect on their experiences.

Students also participate in a two-night, three-day study tour to another country or region in Germany during each academic block. These are designed to further the learning goals of the academic tracks while offering students the opportunity to engage in intercultural comparative experiences.

All excursions and study tours are included in the program fee. Destinations and dates may be finalized after arrival in Berlin.

ACADEMIC PROJECTS

CIEE Academic Projects are designed based on each student’s academic track or interest, individual learning goals, qualifications and résumé, and placement availability. Our partner organizations come from the wide range of business, non-governmental, and community enterprises in Berlin. Academic Projects provide students a unique opportunity to learn first-hand about the economic, cultural, and social structures of the German workplace and volunteer environments. Students interested in an Academic Project must submit additional materials as part of their application.

CULTURAL ACTIVITIES AND SPORTS

Throughout the block, CIEE organizes cultural activities that help students get to know their peers, as well as their host community and culture. Activities may include cooking lessons, walks to explore Berlin’s vibrant arts scene, trips to local film festivals, concerts, and theater performances, museums and memorials, arts-and-crafts workshops, and board game nights. CIEE interest groups are a great way to have fun and meet other students. Interest groups are driven by student initiative and led by local student “buddies.”

Nearby fields at the former Tempelhof Airport are convenient places for impromptu sports. CIEE students have the opportunity to connect with local residents for a lively pick-up game of volleyball, soccer, or football. CIEE supplies equipment for traditional U.S. sports, such as baseball and football, so students can share them with local community members.

VOLUNTEERING

Giving back and making a difference in the host community is important to CIEE. Community engagement opportunities abound for students willing and interested in connecting to Berlin. Students have many opportunities to volunteer at local organizations, youth centers, schools, and more. They also can volunteer to provide English language tutoring services for children in local community centers, schools, or on the CIEE Global Institute campus.

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Academics

Academics

Students must take two courses per academic block, the equivalent of a full-time course load. Students choose from a wide range of courses in five academic tracks. Most courses are taught in English by CIEE faculty; advanced speakers (at least four semesters of college-level German or the equivalent) might have the option of enrolling in CIEE courses taught in German, depending on availability.

Students will be asked to select a track as part of their application; “no preference: multi-disciplinary” is also an option. Students can select their courses from among all offered courses, regardless of selected track (unless their home universities have other requirements).

ACADEMIC CULTURE

CIEE courses are designed to follow U.S. academic culture and standards. The class environment typically features a combination of traditional lecture and discussion with co-curricular excursions and activities designed to provide students fully “place-based” experience. Heavy emphasis is placed on student participation. Instruction is supported and augmented online by our learning management system, Canvas.

NATURE OF CLASSES

Courses taught at the CIEE Global Institute are typically for CIEE students only. Each course is a full semester in content, so the pace is accelerated and the work load demanding. Classes are scheduled Monday-Friday and meet either two, three, or four times per week. Required co-curricular excursions complement your coursework and immerse you in German history and culture. Depending on your courses, you might visit organizations or sites such as the German Institute for International and Security Affairs to discuss cyber security, walk along the East Side Gallery – the longest existing stretch of the Berlin Wall – with a local artist and political activist, tour Jamba!, a ring-tone creator and marketing firm that has become one of Berlin’s most successful tech start-ups, and more.

All required co-curricular activities are subject to change and may be finalized after arrival in Berlin. Students should make no independent travel plans until receiving final syllabi and event schedules on site.

Students should expect an average of two hours of preparation required for each hour in class. To avoid falling behind, sStudents should not plan personal travel out of Berlin when classes are in session. Attendance at all in-class meetings and co-curricular activities is strictly enforced.

GRADING SYSTEM

The U.S. grading scale of A-F is used. Students are graded on the basis of attendance, class participation, homework, project work, presentations, and midterm and final examinations.

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION

The primary language of instruction is English. Language courses and a limited number of area studies courses for advanced German speakers may be offered in German.

FACULTY

Our faculty come from Germany, the US, and other countries, and represent a wide range of backgrounds and academic traditions. Faculty from local institutions, as well as visiting faculty from around the world, teach CIEE courses. A core group of CIEE faculty members serve as academic coordinators and assists CIEE resident staff members to set up special guest lectures, excursions, activities, and more.

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Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

All Courses

Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be canceled due to insufficient enrollment.

CIEE Study Center Syllabi

To view the most recent syllabi for courses taught by CIEE at our Study Centers, visit our syllabi site.

Courses (with descriptions) offered in Berlin are listed below by block and track; course list subject to change. Courses are 45 contact hours, credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours, unless otherwise noted. To compare classes offered across all Open Campus locations for each block, view the Fall 2017 course comparison tool here.

Berlin FALL 2017 Course List

“GI” denotes courses that are offered at multiple Global Institute sites.

BLOCK 1

Language, Literature and Culture

ARCH 3002 BRGE / URBS 3001 BRGE German Architectural History and Theory
HIST 3001 BRGE (ENG) German History 1871 to Present (in English)
HIST 3001 BRGE (GER) Deutsche Geschichte von 1871 bis zur Gegenwart/ German History 1871 to Present (in German)
GERM 1001 BRGE German Language - Beginning I
GERM 2001 BRGE German Language - Intermediate I
GERM 3001 BRGE German Language - Advanced I
NONCR GERM BRGE Survival German

Business

ECON 3003 BRGE History of Economic Thought from Marx to Hayek
(GI) BUSI 3001 BRGE International Finance
(GI) MKTG 3001 BRGE International Marketing

International Relations and Political Science

(GI) RELI 2001 BRGE / POLI 2001 BRGE Politics of Religion
(GI) POLI 3002 BRGE European Comparative Political Systems
POLI 3001 BRGE Politics of the European Union

Communications, Journalism and New Media

(GI) COMM 3301 BRGE Intercultural Communication and Leadership
(GI) JOUR 3001 BRGE International Journalism

Global and Community Health

(GI) PUBH 3006 BRGE / INRE 3008 BRGE Contemporary Challenges in Global Health
FSCI 3001 BRGE Food, Nutrition, and Culture

GLOBAL ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN/GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY + ENVIRONMENT PROGRAM

ENVI 3102 BRGE Design and Sustainability Seminar

BLOCK 2

Academic Projects

(GI) INSH 3801 BRGE Internship Seminar
(GI) INDR 4901 BRGE Directed Independent Research
(GI) SVCL 3701 BRGE Service-Learning Project

Language, Literature and Culture

HIST 3003 BRGE / GEST 3001 BRGE (ENG) Berlin - The Capital of the 20th Century (in English)
HIST 3003 BRGE / GEST 3001 BRGE (GER) Berlin, die Hauptstadt des 20. Jahrhunderts/Berlin: The Capital of the 20th Century (in German)
LITT 3003 BRGE German Fairy Tales: Grimm Brothers to the Present
HIST 3005 BRGE Holocaust Studies
THES 3001 BRGE Brecht and Revolutionary Theatre
GERM 1001 BRGE German Language - Beginning I
GERM 1002 BRGE German Language - Beginning II
GERM 2002 BRGE German Language - Intermediate II
GERM 3002 BRGE German Language - Advanced II
NONCR GERM BRGE Survival German

Business

(GI) BUSI 3008 BRGE Entrepreneurship and Start-up Culture in Europe
BUSI 3002 BRGE / INRE 3001 BRGE German Business in a European Context
(GI) BUSI 3003 BRGE International Management

International Relations and Political Science

(GI) INRE 4007 BRGE Contemporary Controversies in International Relations
ENVI 3002 BRGE Berlin and the Politics of Building Sustainable Cities

Communications, Journalism and New Media

(GI)COMM 3009 BRGE Media, Gender and Identity (GI) JOUR 3002 BRGE Photojournalism

Global Community Health

PUBH 3007 BRGE / BUSI 3005 BRGE Berlin's Emerging Biotech Industry
(GI) PUBH 3002 BRGE Community and Public Health

GLOBAL ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN/GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY + ENVIRONMENT

ARCH 3102 BRGE Computational Design Theory and Application
ENVS 3101 BRGE Geospatial Information Systems

BLOCK 3

Academic Projects

(GI) INSH 3801 BRGE Internship Seminar
(GI) INDR 4901 BRGE Directed Independent Research
(GI) SVCL 3701 BRGE Service-Learning Project

Language, Literature and Culture

LITT 3002 BRGE Contemporary German Women Writers and Berlin
(GI) SOCI 3001 BRGE / GEND 3001 BRGE Gender and Sexuality
CINE 3001 BRGE / COMM 3006 BRGE (ENG) German Cinema: Berlin on Screen (in English)
CINE 3001 BRGE / COMM 3006 BRGE (GER) Berlin in der deutschen Filmgeschichte/German Cinema: Berlin on Screen (in German)
GERM 1002 BRGE German Language - Beginning II
GERM 2001 BRGE German Language - Intermediate I
GERM 3001 BRGE German Language - Advanced I
GERM 3003 BRGE German Language - Advanced Composition and Conversation
NONCR GERM BRGE Survival German

Business

(GI) MGMT 3001 BRGE Business Ethics and Leadership
ECON 3001 BRGE / BUSI 3006 BRGE Reinventing Berlin's Economy after the Fall of the Wall
ECON 3002 BRGE The Euro - A Currency in Crisis

International Relations and Political Science

(GI) INRE 3003 BRGE European Immigration
(GI) RELI 2001 BRGE / POLI 2001 BRGEPolitics of Religion
ENVI 3001 BRGE / INRE 3009 BRGE Global Energy Conservation and Diplomacy

Communications, Journalism and New Media

(GI) COMM 3301 BRGE Intercultural Communication and Leadership
(GI) COMM 3008 BRGE Music, Media and Public Spheres
COMM 3010 BRGE Radio Production and Digital Storytelling in Berlin

Global and Community Health

(GI) PUBH 3003 BRGE Comparative Health Care Systems
(GI) PSYC 3002 BRGE Psychology of Health and Illness

LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE TRACK

GERMAN LANGUAGE COURSES

  • Beginner I (A1)
  • Beginner II (A2.1; A2.2)
  • Intermediate I (B1.1; B1.2)
  • Intermediate II (B2.1; B2.2)
  • Advanced I (C1.1; C1.2)
  • Advanced II (C2)

Contact hours: 60. Credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

During the course selection process, students interested in any German language course will be instructed to take an online German language assessment test to determine their proficiency level, which will be finally determined on site. Beginners are exempt.

CIEE German courses are designed to help students rapidly improve their German whether they are beginners or nearly fluent speakers. CIEE students at all levels will learn and practice in all areas vital to successful communication in German: speaking, comprehension, reading, writing, self-correction, sociocultural competence, and self-reflection. CIEE Berlin follows the standards set forth by the Goethe Institute curricula, which are, in turn, based on the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

GERM 1001 BRGE
GERMAN LANGUAGE - BEGINNING I

The course is designed for students with no or little previous knowledge of the German language. Within six weeks students will develop basic language comprehension and communication skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing German. By the end of the course, students will be able to employ simple sentences and expressions when dealing with various situations of daily life (at the supermarket, in a restaurant, at school, at the office, with friends and family, etc.). They will be able to talk about themselves and their area of studies and ask others about their personal information.

GERM 1002 BRGE
GERMAN LANGUAGE - BEGINNING II

This course is a six-week intensive training in German language and culture that will expand known and develop new communicative skills and knowledge of grammar in order to prepare students to move on to proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing German in later courses. 2 semesters of German, or GERM 1001/1002 at CIEE or equivalent (contingent upon placement), are prerequisite for this course.

While this course emphasizes correct grammar and usage throughout, we will focus on developing a comfortable, communicative environment in which all students can feel confident in speaking at this early stage of learning the language. Students will perform in a variety of styles and do so in a way that helps them to better understand their German environment and exposes them to the rich cultural life of the city of Berlin. Taking advantage of the location, students will go on short field trips, try out their German with native informants and German students, and create presentations about current events in the city.

Learning by doing! The language students and instructors use in this course is German.

GERM 2001 BRGE
GERMAN LANGUAGE – INTERMEDIATE I

This class is designed for students to practice and improve all four main language skills – speaking, listening, reading, and writing – in a highly communicative classroom setting. Students systematically review grammar by working with diverse materials designed to introduce them to German culture.

While this course emphasizes correct grammar and usage throughout, we will focus on developing a comfortable, communicative environment in which all students can feel confident in speaking at this early stage of learning the language. Students will perform in a variety of styles and do so in a way that helps them to better understand their German environment and exposes them to the rich cultural life of the city of Berlin. Taking advantage of the location, students will go on short field trips, try out their German with native informants and German students, and create presentations about current events in the city.

Learning by doing! The language students and instructors use in this course is German.

GERM 2002 BRGE
GERMAN LANGUAGE – INTERMEDIATE II

This course is a six-week intensive training in German language and culture that will expand known and develop new communicative skills and knowledge of grammar in order to prepare students to move on to proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing German in later courses. 2-3 semesters of German, or GERM 1001/1002/2001 at CIEE or equivalent (contingent upon placement) are prerequisite for this course.

While this course emphasizes correct grammar and usage throughout, we will focus on developing a comfortable, communicative environment in which all students can feel confident in speaking at this early stage of learning the language. Students will perform in a variety of styles and do so in a way that helps them to better understand their German environment and exposes them to the rich cultural life of the city of Berlin. Taking advantage of the location, students will go on short field trips, try out their German with native informants and German students, and create presentations about current events in the city.

Learning by doing! The language students and instructors use in this course is German.

GERM 3001 BRGE
GERMAN LANGUAGE – ADVANCED I

This intensive language course runs for six weeks. Using authentic texts, we will explore the German language and German culture together. For this reason, the sole language of instruction will be German.

„Übung macht den Meister!“ („Practice makes perfect!“)

Initially, it may seem difficult or unusual to communicate solely in German. But every day it will get a little bit easier. Guaranteed!

We will use role play scenarios and dialogues, discuss aspects of Berlin and Germany, and learn how to write a resumé and how to conduct oneself in a job interview.

GERM 3002 BRGE
GERMAN LANGUAGE - ADVANCED II

German 3002 is designed for advanced learners of German language. It will review and deepen students’ knowledge of German grammar with an increasing focus on stylistics in both oral and written speech. Students will read, write and perform in a variety of genres and do so in a way that helps students to better understand their German environment and exposes them to the rich cultural life of the city of Berlin. Taking advantage of the location, students will go on short field trips, try out their German with native informants and German students, and create presentations about current events in the city.

GERM 3003 BRGE
GERMAN LANGUAGE – ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION

This course is a six-week intensive training in German language and culture that will expand advanced communicative skills, vocabulary, and knowledge of grammar in order to prepare students for content courses conducted in German. While this course emphasizes correct grammar and usage throughout, we will focus on developing a comfortable, communicative environment in which all students can feel confident in engaging in discussions at a more complex level and on more complex topics.

Students will be exposed to and familiarized with a wide variety of text types, from literature to journalistic essays, works in translation, academic articles, travel logs and encyclopedic entries. Furthermore, these texts give information about German culture and everyday life, thus reinforcing students' cultural and communicative skills in German. Students are expected to read texts and write on related topics drawn from both literary and theoretical sources that get assigned during the semester.

Students will work with a variety of print and electronic media as well as movies, and perform in a variety of styles to better understand the German media landscape at their fingertips in the rich cultural life of Berlin.

Direct-measure in-class assessments are scheduled throughout the course. Tests and oral projects aim to challenge language learners to demonstrate proficiencies in speaking and writing and in their cultural knowledge.

Taking advantage of the location, students will go on short field trips, try out their German with native speakers and German students, and create presentations about current events in the city.

Learning by doing! Therefore, the language students and instructors use in this course is German.

NONCR GERM BRGE
SURVIVAL GERMAN

This course is designed for students who wish to learn basic skills for communicating in German during their study program in Berlin. The aim is to provide the linguistic tools necessary for students to make themselves understood as well as to enable them to gain a better understanding of the way of life in Berlin. To achieve these ends, students will practice the German language in everyday situations through role-playing, listening exercises and excursions. The instruction will make use of a wide variety of media that illuminate daily life in Germany. Non-Credit.

ARCH 3002 BRGE / URBS 3001 BRGE
GERMAN ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY AND THEORY

This course examines the dynamic history of the German architectural tradition, beginning with the baroque, and then proceeding through Neoclassicism, Historicism, Modernism, and ending with the rise of the “starchitect.” The influence of political, cultural, technological, and historical factors will be emphasized as influences on the process of design and construction.

Throughout the course, representative architectural examples in Berlin will also be studied. As the German art critic and journalist Karl Scheffler wrote in 1910, “Berlin is a city condemned forever to becoming and never to being.” As those words indicate, the city is a particularly rich site to observe how numerous competing political visions and social movements influenced the capital’s architecture and urban development.

HIST 3001 BRGE (ENG)
HIST 3001 BRGE (GER)
GERMAN HISTORY 1871 TO PRESENT/ DEUTSCHE GESCHICHTE VON 1871 BIS ZUR GEGENWART

How and why did Germany end up unleashing catastrophic violence in Europe and the world not once, but twice, by the middle of the 20th century? In this course, we will focus on the political, social / cultural, and military trends that led to the two World Wars and culminated in Germany’s absolute defeat – and how the two post-war German states responded to, accounted for, and attempted to move away from their destructive history. Topics to be discussed include: liberalism, conservatism, political parties, imperialism, anti-Semitism, nationalism, revolution, and memorialization. The material used in this course will include a combination of primary sources (speeches, laws, images, videos, works of philosophy and fiction), secondary sources (articles or book chapters), films, and site visits. Students will have the opportunity to deepen their knowledge of a specific event / period through the final project, which is an historical analysis of a cultural-historical artifact. We will also consider the theoretical stances that underlie different narratives of German history, e.g. continuity vs. rupture, the ideas of causality and contingency. For just as it is insufficient to claim that one cannot comprehend how, for example, the Holocaust happened, it is just as insufficient to argue that it was bound to happen. (Taught in English and/or German)

CINE 3001 BRGE / COMM 3006 BRGE (ENG)
CINE 3001 BRGE / COMM 3006 BRGE (GER)
GERMAN CINEMA: BERLIN ON SCREEN/ BERLIN IN DER DEUTSCHEN FILMGESCHICHTE

(Offered in English and German.) This course is designed to introduce students to the history of German cinema with a special focus on the crucial role of Berlin as both production site and film set. Although it is not possible to develop a firm grasp of German film history in the short span of time at our disposal, we will move (by and large) in chronological order, from the Weimar period to the present, and will do so with a twofold purpose: a) to learn to critically analyze films as aesthetic artifacts and cultural texts, and b) to use them as windows to and/or mirrors of the respective societies from which they emerge. Our screenings and discussions will be enriched by three co-curricular events, such as: a book presentation by film historian Brigitta Wagner; a screening of the horror classic Nosferatu to live music at the nearby Passionskirche; and a visit to the small production/distribution company Filmgalerie 451; a discussion with filmmaker Christoph Hochhäusler. (Taught in English and German)

(GI) SOCI 3001 BRGE / GEND 3001 BRGE
GENDER AND SEXUALITY

This course will explore issues of gender and sexuality by reading, watching, and listening to contemporary gender- and queer-inspired artistic productions. As we attend a variety of exhibitions, artist talks, and film screenings, or read fiction and poetry, our focus will be on how each of these “texts” construct in a specific way and thereby negotiate gender and its intersection with other axes of difference such as ethnicity, sexual orientation, or class; how they represent the human body; and how they relate multiple forms of sexuality to social categories and hierarchies. The course examines how a fictional story or a dance performance, for example, may supplement, undermine, or complicate the very interpretative categories that we as readers inevitably bring to the object of analysis.

HIST 3005 BRGE
HOLOCAUST STUDIES

This course introduces you to some of the major questions and historical debates that continue to surround the origins, implementation, and aftermath of the Holocaust – the systematic, industrialized mass murder of an estimated six million European Jews, as well as homosexuals, communists, Roma and Sinti, handicapped, and other victims by Nazi Germany and its collaborators during WWII. The first part of the course will focus on the historical context, planning and execution of the Holocaust. The second part of the course will introduce you to the major historiographical debates in the post-war period. The third part of the course will focus on memorialization and the politics of memory in contemporary Germany. Because this course takes place in Berlin, the former Nazi capital, where the political and logistical decisions for the Final Solution were made, special attention will be given to issues in Holocaust studies that are peculiar to Germany as the country of the perpetrators, namely domestic German controversies about Holocaust memorialization, the place of the Holocaust in German national self-understanding, and more broadly the concept of “coming to terms with the past” (Vergangenheitsbewältigung).

HIST 3003 BRGE / GEST 3001 BRGE (ENG)
HIST 3003 BRGE / GEST 3001 BRGE (GER)
BERLIN - THE CAPITAL OF THE 20th CENTURY/ BERLIN (in English), DIE HAUPTSTADT DES 20. JAHRUNDERTS (in German)

Berlin was the stage upon which the drama of the turbulent 20th century played out. In the 1920s, Berlin defined what it meant to be modern: it was the intellectual fulcrum of a liberal republic and a glamorous café society. But that republic was unstable, and soon a fascist government destroyed this atmosphere of tolerance and many of the great works of art and literature created by its talented freethinkers. After 1945, the bombed-out city became a frontline of the Cold War, but with the fall of the Wall in 1989, Berlin began a new era as a center of creativity. Berlin’s fascinating and turbulent past makes it the perfect place to study what 20th-century modernity means, and what the future of modernity might hold. This course combines seminars and site visits to study the cultural and historical meanings and the legacy of the 20th century using Berlin as a case study. (Taught in English and/or German.)

LITT 3002 BRGE
CONTEMPORARY GERMAN WOMEN WRITERS AND BERLIN

This course aims to explore the literary tradition of German women writers, focusing on primary texts by 21st century / contemporary women writers, while at the same time establishing a broad basis of knowledge of major historical topics of the past century, as represented in history and reflected in literary texts by female authors.

These topics include: the role of women at the fin de siècle; the New Woman in the Weimar Republic; life under National Socialism; women’s roles in post-WWII reconstruction; the “deutsche Hausfrau” of the Fifties, women's roles in the GDR; the women’s liberation movement in the 1960s; female terrorists in the BRD; the status of minority women writers in Germany; East vs. West German writers and the effects of reunification; literary production and the book market after reunification, the female author and the female reader, and others. We will also make use of film for most of the cultural time periods.

Because many of the contemporary women writers are from Berlin, write or live in Berlin, class discussions will also illuminate the city's role in fictional writing. The course will moreover include the discussion of the literary canon, of the interpretation of literary texts, and last not least the question of the existence of "feminine writing".

LITT 3003 BRGE
GERMAN FAIRY TALES: GRIMM BROTHERS TO THE PRESENT

The course is an exploration of the nature of the German fairy tale as a literary genre and institution. We examine its historical origins in the late 18th century, its cultural significance for Germany, the formalistic elements and thematic features developed in the German fairy tale over time and its dissemination in literary and pop culture in our contemporary globalized world.

THES 3001 BRGE
BRECHT AND REVOLUTIONARY THEATRE

One of the most influential traditions in 20th and 21st century theater emerged through the work of German playwright Bertolt Brecht. His “epic theater” (episches Theater) was designed in 1920s Berlin to stage interventions in politics and society: “Art is not a mirror held up to reality but a hammer with which to shape it.” In this course, students will study and see Brecht’s own plays and learn about the political and cultural contexts which gave rise to his theater and his theories about theater (the Weimar Republic, his exile during the Third Reich, his work in East Germany). This seminar also takes advantage of taking place in Berlin which affords us with the ability to get to visit Brecht’s former theater (the Berliner Ensemble) and to see how his work lives on today (e.g., in the radical practice of the famous Volksbühne). The course culminates in a project aimed at collectively developing a plan to adapt a Brecht play for the contemporary moment.

BUSINESS TRACK

(GI) BUSI 3001 BRGE
INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

This course provides students with an overview of the dynamics of the global financial and international monetary systems. Students develop knowledge of the fundamental concepts needed to understand foreign direct investment, financial flows, international trade and investment deals. As political risk and economic exposure to global events have become more immediate, special attention will be given to the 2007-2012 world banking crisis, the role of central banks in the stabilization of national economies, the European debt crisis, and the specific economic challenges to which individual EU countries have been exposed in varying ways. Alternative views and policy measures to help struggling economies overcome the economic and financial crisis – like contracting (or expanding) government spending – as developed by the EU, and the U.S., will be assessed and critically analyzed.

BUSI 3002 BRGE / INRE 3001 BRGE
GERMAN BUSINESS IN A EUROPEAN CONTEXT

As the global economy tanked following the 2008 housing market crisis in the US, one national economy bucked the trend: Germany. What is the secret to the robust and recession-resistant German economy? How does Germany manage to “ride out the storm” of the Euro Crisis and remain a stalwart of European export power? Can Germany continue to maintain its traditions of quality and innovation in the face of increasing global competition? How might Germany need to change to remain competitive and stable in the future?

To answer these questions, this intensive seminar examines the basic structure and dynamics of German business and the German economy and addresses the following themes and issues: the basic size, “shape” and sectors of the German economy including a very brief overview of the history of the German industrial revolution, capitalism vs. socialism during a divided Germany, the “Economic Miracle” of the 1950s, and challenges of reunification and modern developments; government regulation and taxation and economic policy; the important role that trade unions and employee representation play in shaping the economy and economic policy; how the German education and training system shapes the economy and the experience of its workers, managers and leaders; German business culture and practice and the importance of careful planning; Germany’s economic relationship to the EU with specific attention paid to the Euro Crisis; and Germany’s place in the global economy.

(GI) BUSI 3003 BRGE
INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT

This course examines a multinational corporation and the ways it formulates, implements, evaluates, and conducts its international and global business in the most cost-effective and efficient way. As an organic entity, an organization must effectively coordinate all business units (human resources, finance, accounting, sales and marketing, R&D, logistics, corporate social responsibility, just to name a few) across national boundaries, extending them to places where the environment can be challenging and, at times, even hostile. Based on strong intercultural communication skills between all national and international units, management practices among the external and internal environments will constantly interact and determine the success or failure of a company in the international arena. This course will equip students with the necessary tools and concepts to analyze and understand the formulation, implementation and evaluation of a company.

(GI) BUSI 3008 BRGE
ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND START-UP CULTURE IN EUROPE

Students develop an understanding the entrepreneurial process by working on a concrete and locally specific project and business plan. In order to allow students to develop their business plans within a specific European market, this course first examines the entrepreneurial cultures in Europe by comparison with that of the United States. On the basis of this contextual analysis, students reflect on their own values, goals and strengths, pitching ideas, forming team sand developing a business model. Special attention is paid to the results of the customer, market and industry analysis that are used to develop a viable product. The course also investigates different forms of intellectual property rights and explains the first steps of strategic planning. After completing all the assignments, students will be able to pitch an entire business idea based on thorough research.

Company visits and guest lectures from local entrepreneurs allow students to witness and discuss entrepreneurship in action.

ECON 3001 BRGE / BUSI 3006 BRGE
REINVENTING BERLIN'S ECONOMY AFTER THE FALL OF THE WALL

Berlin is a mythical place – everyone can agree on this. Wild, militant and controversial during the first quarter of the 20th century; divided, mysterious and inaccessible for the greater part of the Cold War; then, finally, reunited and cast in the whirlwind of liberal globalization post-‘89, Berlin has re-entered the global stage as the “poor but sexy” capital of Germany. But what exactly makes Berlin distinct? Which are the historic factors and contemporary social forces that lend the city its character? How can we systematically describe and analyze the urban fabric we see around us? More specifically, how does Berlin fare in the global competition for human, cultural and investment capital? And what consequences does participating in this competition have upon Berliners, old and new, the city, its infrastructure and natural environment? In this course, we will develop sustained answers to these questions with a specific focus on Berlin’s economic development after the fall of the Wall. In the process, we will also explore key concepts and theories for the study of metropolitan politics. Teaching tools include a use of a mix of lectures, student presentations, group discussions, videos, practical exercises, field trips and written assignments.

ECON 3002 BRGE
THE EURO - A CURRENCY IN CRISIS

The course focuses on the economic, political and cultural implications of the Euro. Introduced in 2002 as the common currency for the European Union, the Euro has lived a short but highly turbulent life. Initially heralded as a success of European integration, the viability and continued desirability of the currency union has been put into question following the 2007-08 financial crisis. While Germany agreed to the Maastricht treaty and the Euro in the early 1990s in part to placate worries about German hegemony after reunification, the Euro has led to complaints about the very German domination it was meant to prevent. With this domination being not only economic, but also political in nature, the questions this course raises are located at the intersection between monetary policy and socio-political developments in the EU. The course will begin by looking at the historical roots of European integration and the history of money, before examining the economic and political impacts made by the introduction of the Euro. Two extracurricular excursions are featured: first to the German Bundesbank (Federal Reserve), and then to the Representation of the European Commission in Germany.

ECON 3003 BRGE
HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT FROM MARX TO HAYEK

“A study of the history of opinion is a necessary preliminary to the emancipation of the mind” (J.M. Keynes, 1926).

“Ideas won by our intelligence, embodied in our outlook, and forged in our conscience, are chains from which we cannot tear ourselves away without breaking our hearts; they are demons we can overcome only by submitting to them.” (K. Marx).

“(...) the ideas of economists and political philosophers, both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed the world is ruled by little else. Practical men, who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences, are usually the slaves of some defunct economist. Madmen in authority, who hear voices in the air, are distilling their frenzy from some academic scribbler of a few years back” (J.M. Keynes 1936).

The course focuses on the historical development of the various economic schools of thought and puts these schools in a historical perspective, thereby improving the students' comprehension of the study of economics. Through the study of the evolution of economic ideas the students will gain unique appreciation of how modern economics evolved into its present form. The journey starts with the ancient Greek philosophers (Aristotle and Plato) and the early ideas on specialization of trade, division of labor and political economy. Mercantilists and their promotion of positive terms of trade encouraged by government intervention is our next topic of analysis. Furthermore, we are going to explore the Classical Economics, whereby attention is paid on the notion of price and value, distribution, economic growth, the role of the state in the economy and international trade. The Neoclassical School, which is best known for its policy of 'laissez-faire and ‘marginalist’ theories, is the next subject of our exploration. In what follows, the emphasis will be put on Marx’s ‘dialectical materialism’, his labor theory of value, capital accumulation and political economy. Next, selective chapters and passages of Keynes’ work are read in depth, focusing in particular on Keynes in areas of investment, interest rate theory and money and credit demand and his views on political economy. During the last week we will focus on contemporary economics and examine the long-standing debate between the ‘liberal’ Chicago (Friedman) and Austrian (Hayek) schools and the post-Keynesian school of thought.

(GI) MKTG 3001 BRGE
INTERNATIONAL MARKETING

Students will gain an understanding of the issues and processes involved in developing an international marketing and branding strategy and plan, as well as the execution of marketing and PR operations on an international scale. Course content and practical assignments focus on real-world problems such as identifying and evaluating opportunities in international markets, developing and adapting marketing tactics in relation to multiple, specific national market needs and constraints, and coordinating marketing and branding strategies in global markets. Guest lectures by local business professionals and company visits provide first-hand context and experience for the issues explored in the course

(GI) MGMT 3001 BRGE
BUSINESS ETHICS AND LEADERSHIP

This course examines the philosophical foundations and basic principles of ethics as they apply to businesses and the environments in which they operate. Real-world case studies are used to provide students with insight into how businesses and organizations manage – and in some cases fail to manage – challenging ethical and moral dilemmas. Students also consider the particular responsibilities of business leaders in fostering ethical awareness and practices within the corporate context.

COMMUNICATIONS, JOURNALISM, AND NEW MEDIA TRACK

(GI) COMM 3301 BRGE
INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION AND LEADERSHIP

In this class, students develop skills, knowledge, and understanding that will help them communicate and engage more appropriately and effectively in their study abroad location as well as in other intercultural contexts. We will explore various topics in intercultural communication in the context of your experience abroad, and will practice intercultural learning processes that you can apply when working across difference in a wide variety of contexts. You will increase your own cultural self-awareness and develop personal leadership skills to help you become more effective in an interdependent world.

(GI) COMM 3009 BRGE
MEDIA, GENDER AND IDENTITY

In this course, students will apply a critical lens to representations of gender and identity in contemporary media. Taking gender and sexuality as a critical starting point, we will examine the construction of identities under the simultaneous influence of race, class, and nationality. By focusing on popular representations in both the US and the European country where the course is taking place, we will gain a deeper understanding of identities as both culturally specific and influenced by global media. Instead of suggesting that contemporary identities are determined by what we see on TV screens, computers, and in local movie theaters, the course seeks to describe the complex interactions between national audiences and concrete media productions, and analyzes how different audiences reproduce or challenge traditional concepts and stereotypes of gender, race, sexuality, and class. By combining the study of theoretical texts with examples from the advertisement industry, television, the movies, and other forms of contemporary cultural expression, it offers a comprehensive and thorough introduction to contemporary studies of the media and identity.

COMM 3010 BRGE (ENG)
RADIO PRODUCTION AND DIGITAL STORYTELLING IN BERLIN (in English)

This intensive, hands-on course teaches students to use audio as a medium to tell stories that explore the history, places, and people of Berlin. Storytelling through sounds and interviews is our theme. A vibrant, creative city is our playground. Producing radio stories and podcasts is our goal. Students sharpen research and reporting skills, develop interview techniques, and learn or improve their editing and production abilities. The assignments in this course require students step outside their comfort zone and engage with Berliners to uncover interesting pieces of the local society, and tell captivating stories. We visit active radio production facilities to learn about the role radio storytelling has in the contemporary German society, and conduct on-location production experiences to improve our audio collecting skills. Throughout the course, the students will have opportunities to experiment with state-of-the-art radio studio and equipment, which are available on campus. The students’ final assignment – an audio story – will be published online and be considered for broadcast on German airwaves.

(GI) COMM 3005 BRGE
MUSIC, MEDIA AND PUBLIC SPHERES

This course examines music markets and the ongoing evolution of the music industry with a focus on the cultural and social influence of music, the changing perspective of music consumers, and the role of artists and producers. Students will learn about varying debates and models within the music industry, the interaction of music with other media, and the intersection of traditional music forms (radio, records, and concerts) with new technologies such as on-line audio streaming. The course will also explore the importance and economic contribution of popular and alternative music festivals. Utilizing the city as a field site for study, this course will encourage students to engage with a range of music performances and events. The course is taught using a dynamic mix of lectures, case study discussions, student presentations, and a field trip to a local music label.

(GI) JOUR 3001 BRGE
INTERNATIONAL JOURNALISM

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the theories and techniques of journalism, with an emphasis on fairness and accuracy of journalistic coverage of diverse, multi-ethnic communities, the role of journalism in democratic societies, news values and ethics, and reporting and writing techniques. All this is done with a special comparative focus on the situation of journalism in the country of study, in Europe as a whole and the U.S. Using specific examples from especially the first two geographical and political areas, students examine the influence of journalism on politics, business, and society. Being in a vibrant European capital, with dozens of newspapers, magazines, and new media produced here, students experience the location and organizers of the most influential national press briefings as well as attend an editorial board meeting of one of the most popular daily newspapers. They will also pay particular attention to the role of foreign correspondents. Much of the coursework will include practical reporting, with students developing a journalism portfolio based on weekly exercises.

(GI) JOUR 3002 BRGE
PHOTOJOURNALISM

In this course, we will examine how images enter and circulate in the public sphere of news and discussion, analyze how images of current events are made, and study the meanings these images create and the purposes they serve. We will look at the past and present of photojournalism, from its origins in the 19th century to its contemporary forms, at a time when it is being impacted by rapidly changing technologies, media structures and cultural values. As well as reading about the history and contemporary forms of photojournalism, we will study a wide range of photographic images and learn to write and think clearly and incisively about them. We will pay particular attention to the photojournalistic traditions of the host country.

The history of photojournalism is inseparable from the representation of violence, which is its dominant subject. This course will require you to look at graphic, disturbing and shocking images and to think seriously about the questions they raise.

GLOBAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH TRACK

FSCI 3001 BRGE
FOOD, NUTRITION, AND CULTURE

Every person in the world needs access to safe and healthy food to live. In this class, students will gain insight into food production, consumption, and regulation in Europe and the United States, as well as culinary traditions in Germany and their role in Germany’s multicultural modern-day society. The class will also explore comparative food marketing and trade issues and the regulation of new technologies like genetic engineering. The class will use a systems-based public health lens to discuss a wide range of topics such as sustainability, food security, consumer information, obesity and eating disorders, trends such as gluten-free dieting, current activism (e.g. the “slow food” movement), health claims (“lowers the risk of heart disease”) and quality seals (“fair-trade certified”). Guest lectures, site visits, and brief research assignments provide a basis for lively class discussion.

(GI) PSYC 3002 BRGE
PSYCHOLOGY OF HEALTH AND ILLNESS

Health psychology focuses on the relationship between behavior, health, and illness while seeking to identify the predictors of health-compromising and health-enhancing factors. Through a dual focus on healthcare and psychology, students will examine illness identities in the European context. Special emphasis will be placed on cultural differences related to quality of life, self-help, religious beliefs, alternative medicine, and rituals related to dying and death. Through an examination of the relevant literature, guest lectures and site visits, the course addresses philosophical questions about the perceptions and definitions of what it means to be “healthy” or “unhealthy” within a cultural context.

(GI) PUBH 3002 BRGE
COMMUNITY AND PUBLIC HEALTH

This course examines the interface of community involvement and highly effective governmental approaches to public health. By studying how actors in the public health sphere collaborate to identify public health needs, select appropriate responses, and implement large-scale projects, students will gain understanding of the different public health issues facing communities in Europe, and the varied approaches to public health. The course pays special attention to identifying and understanding the main actors in public health systems, how public health policies and systems are influenced, and how the implementation of public health tools are affected by cultural and religious traditions. Students participate in site visits to public health institutions at various levels (local, regional, national).

(GI) PUBH 3003 BRGE
COMPARATIVE HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS

Students learn about the economic, cultural, ethical, and structural challenges faced by health care systems today. The course explores different approaches to health care system organization and financing, strategies for using limited resources, and challenges to providing universal access to health care. Students address specific approaches to these challenges, with a comparative focus on European countries and the United States.

(GI) PUBH 3006 BRGE / INRE 3008 BRGE
CONTEMPORARY CHALLENGES IN GLOBAL HEALTH

In this course students examine the economic, cultural, ethical, and structural challenges faced by health care systems today. The course explores different approaches to health care system organization and financing, strategies for using limited resources, and challenges to providing universal access to health care. Students address specific approaches to these challenges, with a comparative focus on European countries and the United States.

PUBH 3007 BRGE / BUSI 3005 BRGE
BERLIN’S EMERGING BIOTECH INDUSTRY

This course examines the complexities of a fast-growing marketplace and the powerful economic, social, and medical implications of biomedical / biotech advancements. Students will explore how federal, state, and European-level policies as well as public and private partnerships evolve in this area to affect diagnostics, R&D of new substances, regenerative medicine, and industrial biotechnologies. Highlights will include how these emerging and established biotech industries interact with the development of medical devices, innovations in health care delivery, and health promotion. The course includes a variety of field visits designed to help students better understand the interface between biotech, medicine and health care, information technology, engineering, and start-up opportunities.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE TRACK

ENVI 3002 BRGE
BERLIN AND THE POLITICS OF BUILDING SUSTAINABLE CITIES

Hardly anyone opposes the idea of sustainability, today: Designing a present that neither compromises the future nor disadvantages those who today are enabling industrialized lifestyles and bear their burden without the opportunity to participate themselves. But shared values do not translate into action easily. And, indeed, the concept has been stretched so far as to render a consensus of shared values all but unrecognizable. The object of this course is to unravel the concept of sustainability and study its translation into politics and policies in multi-level governance structures. The course will focus on Berlin as a case study of urban governance for sustainability. It will subsequently compare local policy challenges in national and international contexts, developing a more nuanced view of the top–down and bottom–up strategies of building sustainable cities. The course combines a comparative policy analysis approach with concepts of international relations studies.

The course is divided into three sections. The first will introduce the multiple levels of sustainability governance, working outward from the Berlin example. Students will develop an understanding of the concepts and implementation of sustainability policies on the respective policy levels as well as related approaches of policy analysis. The second section will focus on the implementation of sustainability policies in Berlin, focusing on transportation, infrastructure planning, energy, water and consumption. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the city’s policy challenges, the respective actors involved and the developments in respective policy fields. The final section will contrast the case of Berlin in national and international comparisons of urban sustainability strategies. Students will gain analytical perspective by focusing on both methods and content of this comparative analysis. Classes will place special emphasis on academic discussion based on readings, research projects and site visits.

Sustainability politics present a complex interaction of technological and political innovation. Understanding the co-evolutionary processes and trade-offs involved and developing the tools to analyze and improve respective solutions are the overarching goals of this course.

(GI) INRE 3003 BRGE
EUROPEAN IMMIGRATION

Subjects of migration vary in different geographies and time scales. Migration is sometimes explored as the movement of people (together with knowledge, goods, capital and networks) across borders. It is understood as a platform of challenges. It is also examined in relation to state policies. The course will provide a detailed review of European immigration particularly since the late 20th century. The course is arranged thematically, rather than temporally. By looking at various subjects of European immigration through empirical case studies, it will build up an interactive discussion with some questions: what are the definitions of migration? Who is (not) a migrant? Who has control over the definitions? What are the features of migration? Does it complement, compete with, subvert and / or foreshadow ethnic, national, religious, class and gender identities? How do practices of migration cohabit with the state? What are the references in migration studies to concepts such as multiculturalism, toleration, collective rights, alienation and difference?

(GI) INRE 4007 BRGE
CONTEMPORARY CONTROVERSIES IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

The course provides an overview of important international conflicts of our time, their causes, main agents, and recent developments. Investigating a number of case studies will allow us to not only identify and learn in detail about different areas of international controversy, but also to study models of international cooperation. Course participants are to analyze a variety of current conflicts by diagnosing the conflict, providing an outlook for the medium-term future, and proposing solutions. Classroom content is supplemented and enhanced by debate meetings with experts and practitioners from different organizations and institutions.

The course addresses the following and other questions: In which policy domains do we find contemporary / future international controversies? What are the ways in which these controversies are diffused and settled? What are existing obstacles to the resolution and settlement of international conflicts? What major multilateral forums exist? Is global governance a realistic and desirable goal? What could possible forms look like?

(GI) RELI 2001 BRGE / POLI 2001 BRGE
POLITICS OF RELIGION

This course examines the relationship between church, religion and state, evaluating a comprehensive range of thematic approaches in the politics of religion. Where evidence, both current and historical, suggests a relationship between religion and morality, this course will review how religious morality informs the politics of the state, and how some societies are moving towards popular and populist notions of civic morality. Through the contrast between civic and religious morality, students will explore case studies in different countries on issues such as homosexuality, contraceptives, abortion, legitimate and illegitimate violence, the role of women in society, and the significance of rational thought in the sciences.

POLI 3001 BRGE
POLITICS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION

This course examines the relationship between church, religion and state, evaluating a comprehensive range of thematic approaches in the politics of religion. Where evidence, both current and historical, suggests a relationship between religion and morality, this course will review how religious morality informs the politics of the state, and how some societies are moving towards popular and populist notions of civic morality. Through the contrast between civic and religious morality, students will explore case studies in different countries on issues such as homosexuality, contraceptives, abortion, legitimate and illegitimate violence, the role of women in society, and the significance of rational thought in the sciences.

(GI) POLI 3002 BRGE
EUROPEAN COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS

This course examines the political systems of various European nation-states. Focus is placed on the main political cleavages in each, such as class, ideology, ethnicity, and religion, and how these divisions have influenced the political playing field. Additional topics include nationalism, citizenship, party structures, corporatism, the welfare state, and electoral politics. A special focus will be recent symptomatic challenges to European democracy. As we compare the features of these different democratic systems in detail and relate them to their historical and cultural context, we will focus on three major challenges common to all of these democracies: the decreasing level of participation, especially regarding voter turnout; the decline of large political parties, which raises the question of who, in future, is going to mediate between the citizens’ interests and those of the state; and the perception that the major decisions in democratic countries are increasingly made outside the purview of democratic institutions.

ENVI 3001 BRGE / INRE 3009 BRGE
GLOBAL ENERGY CONSERVATION AND DIPLOMACY

The focus of this course is the global energy situation of the XXI Century as it relates to its historical roots, to the technological advances in the last century and the current challenges posed as each nation-state vies to secure its energy needs for the future. For this purpose, various actors need to be taken into account, including governments, the private sector, multilateral organizations, as well as non-governmental organizations, in order to dissect and understand the dynamics of the global energy diplomacy. New sources of energy, such as biofuels and alternative energies, along with environmental concerns will significantly impact the future geopolitical situation in the world and sustainability of each and every country. As long term national security and energy independence will dominate the future international diplomacy agendas in the XXI Century, particular focus will be given to the international negotiations among the various worldwide actors involved, and to the central role of Germany in finding alternative procurement sources of energy, as well as in European energy conservation issues. This course will include in-class discussions, case study resolution as well as an excursion to the German Federal Environmental Ministry and/or to the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy in Berlin to meet with experts relating to these issues.

ACADEMIC PROJECTS

Each Academic Project placement will be designed based on the student’s academic track, project learning goals, qualifications, resume, and availability of placements. The process is highly individualized and goal oriented. Students enrolled in an Academic Project will receive additional academic support that informs and enhances the placement experience.

Students may participate in up to two different Academic Projects per semester, in blocks II and/or III. To qualify for participation, students must be in the location for at least one block in advance of the Academic Project in order to prepare for and plan the placement.

(GI) INSH 3801 BRGE
INTERNSHIP SEMINAR

The CIEE Academic Internship provides immersion in the local work environment and helps build both practical skills and intercultural competence. Students will learn how to apply academic knowledge in a business setting, interact with co-workers, and compare teamwork and interpersonal interactions in different cultures. Students will work in local companies and organizations for a total of 100-120 contact hours. On-site experience is reinforced by a solid academic component with weekly seminar meetings and individual academic advising meetings, for a total of 15 contact hours. Total contact hours: 115-135. Credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

(GI) INDR 4901 BRGE
DIRECTED INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

CIEE supports qualified students who wish to pursue an academically rigorous independent research project while abroad. In order to enroll, students must submit a research proposal including a clearly defined research topic, explanation of research plans, description of preparation in the planned area of study, list of resources, tentative outline of a final paper, and suggested schedule of progress. Students complete a total of 100-120 hours of research and meet regularly with an advisor to complete an academically rigorous, ethically sound, and culturally appropriate research project and final research paper. Approval for participation in Directed Independent Research must be obtained from CIEE and the student’s home institution prior to arrival on the program. Total contact hours: 115-135. Credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

(GI) SVCL 3701 BRGE
SERVICE-LEARNING PROJECT

The Service-Learning Project combines a practical community-based project with a CIEE Seminar and is designed to challenge students to combine their course-based learning with practical experiences in relevant community-based projects. The project consists of a new project (or an extension of an existing project) that meets the demonstrated need of a local community organization. Students are required to develop a diagnostic plan and to produce a full project proposal that will be reviewed for approval by a service-learning committee by the end of the previous academic block of study. The project will include a community needs-assessment, data collection, and final presentation. Students will work in local organizations for a total of 100-120 contact hours. The service-learning seminar covers the core service-learning principles of engagement, reflection, reciprocity, and public dissemination. Total contact hours: 115-135. Credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

GLOBAL ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN / GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY + ENVIRONMENT COURSE OFFERINGS

The Global Architecture + Design and Global Sustainability + Environment courses all have course-specific pre-requisites, which will be reviewed by Resident Staff for final enrollment on-site.

ENVI 3102 BRGE
DESIGN AND SUSTAINABILITY SEMINAR

Since 2014, most of the Earth’s 7.5 billion people live in cities. This number is expected to increase to 70% of almost 10 billion people by 2050. An increasingly urbanized planet also coincides with an increasing awareness of anthropogenic stresses on the earth’s natural systems and growing experience and approaches for improvement. It’s clear that urban environments will have an important role to play in developing a more sustainable future for the entire planet. In this seminar students learn about the role of cities in positively and negatively influencing global climate and biological systems, and the approaches taken by European cities to mitigate the negative impact while creating healthier, happier, and more productive urban environments. Issues will span holistic dimensions of sustainable discourse, emphasizing the relationship and balance of environmental, social, cultural, and economic factors. The course will focus specifically on the northern European context, especially the host city, Berlin, where students will regularly visit projects and meet with local practitioners. Total contact hours: 45. Credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

ARCH 3102 BRGE
COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN THEORY AND APPLICATION

In this Science and Technology workshop, students will learn computational design theory and application with Rhinoceros and Grasshopper. Designer increasingly need to create reactive and flexible environments which are efficient and adaptive at the same time and capable to integrate diverse and competing requirements. Computational design tools, especially when paired with environmental data sources enable provide multi-performative solutions which handle the complexity of multi-factorial demands and diverse environments of the present and often reach out into the future as an enabler/catalyst. Rather than masterful command of specific tools, this course investigates the intersection of technologies and benefits of platforms. The instructional goal of the course is therefore to exhibit judgement in utilizing media for purpose, rather than rely purely on calculus. Total contact hours: 45. Credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

ENVS 3101 BRGE
GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS

This Science and Technology Workshop focuses on Geospatial Information Systems (GIS). Powerful technologies have emerged in recent years that expand our abilities to manage, process, and analyze data. These tools can help us to better understand and integrate social, economic, and environmental systems, invaluable in building more sustainable society and environment. GIS and other technologies are already integrated in our lives in many ways, from digital maps on phones and in cars, to the management of infrastructure. It’s expected that efficiencies and reliance on these tools will only increase and the world urbanizes further. Smart cities, automated transportation, even urban farming are some areas under development. This courses provides training and investigates the application of GIS and other data management platforms in creating more sustainable cities. The tools celebrated but also viewed critically. How can we ensure the benefits are reaching broad segments of society? Total contact hours: 45. Credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

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