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Berlin Future Cities Studio Fall 2014
Berlin Future Cities Studio 2014
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Study Abroad in Berlin
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Program Overview

Program Overview

 
 

Imagine working with leading experts and innovators to complete a cutting-edge research and design project. Study with Berlin’s thought-leaders and practitioners to gain an understanding of architecture and design within an emerging global context. Pursue hands-on design work in a modern studio using the latest technology to address an aspect of the current global environment. And observe centuries of architectural history up close throughout Germany and Europe – all with CIEE.

Study abroad in Berlin and you’ll:

  • Take part in the Future Cities Design Studio, which features an interdisciplinary perspective, and exciting research and design projects.
  • Visit and study landmark buildings by celebrated architects, such as the Reichstag Dome by Foster and Partners and Potsdamer Platz buildings by Renzo Piano Building Workshop.
  • Study sustainable development in Berlin, with guided visits to sites such as the Holzmarkt and Spreefeld, experimental cooperative housing and urban farming culture.
  • Enjoy excursions to local places of interest such as the Bauhaus in Dessau and the Baroque palaces of Potsdam.
  • Take guided overnight study tours to important European cities such as Hamburg and Dresden, and exchange with other Global AD students studying in Barcelona and Prague.
  • Hear from, and interact with, visiting faculty and professionals during a series of lectures, critiques, and in-class visits.

Global Architecture & Design Students Present at the 2015 CIEE Annual Conference

 
 
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Scholarships & Grants

Scholarships & Grants

We want as many students as possible to benefit from studying abroad. That’s why CIEE awards more than $5 million every year – more than any other international educational organization – to make study abroad affordable.

Applicants to this program are eligible for the following scholarships and grants:

  • Ping Scholarships for Academic Excellence
  • Ping Scholarships for Academic Excellence

    $2,500 toward program costs. To recognize high academic achievement, CIEE offers a limited number of merit scholarships to our strongest students. These awards are based on students’ academic records, and on the submission of a personal essay describing to us how their CIEE program will impact their college experience and future career plans.

    https://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/scholarships-grants/

  • Global Access Initiative (GAIN) Grants
  • Global Access Initiative (GAIN) Grants

    The GAIN Grant helps cover airfare costs to and from CIEE program locations for students who demonstrate high financial need. GAIN Grants are available for short-term (January and summer), semester and year-long CIEE programs.

    https://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/scholarships-grants/

  • CIEE Gilman Go Global Grant
  • CIEE Gilman Go Global Grant

    Applicants for the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship can apply for the CIEE Gilman Go Global Grant, which provides both program cost support and support for airfare. Students will have to provide proof of having applied to the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship, upon request.

    https://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/scholarships-grants/

To be considered, simply check the “Scholarships and Grants” box on your program application.
Apply now

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The CIEE Difference

The CIEE Difference

INNOVATIVE FUTURE CITIES PROGRAM

In studio space in the heart of Berlin, you’ll experiment and integrate design methods, programming, and social science research that push the limits of possibility. Explore the powerful role of technology-aided design during hands-on studios and workshops. Your goal: to study and analyze the conditions of the host city that give rise to a more sustainable and equitable future, and design future-oriented projects that push beyond limitations of today and celebrate emerging possibility.

This cutting-edge program has you interacting with Berlin’s elite architecture and design firms, institutes, and organizations. Berlin’s architecture and design community are your professors. Gain a real-world connection to subjects learned in class.

Further, you’ll have exclusive access to the Global Institute Fab Lab and explore digital fabrication techniques with large format 3D printing and CNC milling.

Collaborative Projects

Come together and create. You’ll have the opportunity to connect with your peers on CIEE Global Architecture and Design programs in other cities to share knowledge, develop projects, and debate common questions in a truly international platform.

Excursions

CIEE gets you out of the classroom to see examples of German architecture and urban design. You might visit landmark buildings by celebrated architects, such as the Reichstag Dome by Foster and Partners and Potsdamer Platz buildings by Renzo Piano Building Workshop, or new innovative projects such as the Spreefeld, an experimental sustainable housing cooperative; Prinzessinnengärten, a pop-up garden; Tempelhoferfeld, a former airport turned public park; and more. You’ll also visit two architecturally important cities on overnight trips to Hamburg, Weimar, Dessau, Prague, or Barcelona.

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Dates, Deadlines & Fees

Dates, Deadlines & Fees

We want to make sure you get the most out of your experience when you study abroad with CIEE, which is why we offer the most inclusions in our fees.

The program fee includes:

  • Tuition and housing
  • Pre-departure advising and optional on-site airport meet and greet
  • Full-time program leadership and support
  • Field trips and cultural activities
  • CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits
Please note, program dates are subject to change. Please contact your CIEE Study Abroad Advisor before purchasing airfare. Click the button to view more detailed information about dates and fees as well as estimated additional costs. Please talk with your University Study Abroad Advisor about additional fees that may be charged by your home institution when participating in a program abroad.
Program
Application Due
Start Date
End Date
Costs
Fall 2016 (18 wks)
05/15/2016
08/15/2016
12/17/2016
$19,450

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$14,607
Housing ***
$4,425
Insurance
$118

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$2,600
International Airfare **
$1,200
Local Transportation
$400
Books & Supplies
$450
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$2,800

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $900 per semester for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring 2017 (18 wks)
11/15/2016
01/09/2017
05/13/2017
$19,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$14,958
Housing ***
$4,425
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the student apartment option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$2,600
International Airfare **
$1,200
Local Transportation
$400
Books & Supplies
$450
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$2,800

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $900 per semester for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Fall 2017
05/15/2017
TBA
TBA
$19,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, residence permit fees, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$14,958
Housing ***
$4,425
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Students in the homestay option have two meals per day provided as part of the program fee. No meals are included in the on-campus residence hall option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$2,600
International Airfare **
$1,200
Local Transportation
$400
Books & Supplies
$450
Visa Fees
$82
Personal expenses
$2,800

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in on-campus residence hall; homestay students should budget $900 per semester for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
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Eligibility
2.5 Overall GPA

Eligibility

  • Overall GPA 2.5
  • Students must be majoring in Architecture, Environmental Design, Industrial Design, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Sustainability studies, Urban Design or minoring in these areas and have completed 2-3 semesters of design studio or a project-based course in their major.

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Recommended Credit

Recommended Credit

Total credit is 15 – 18 semester/22.5 – 27 quarter hours.

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Program Requirements

Program Requirements

Students are required to take three courses on the program: Future Cites Design Studio, Future Cities Seminar, and the Science, Engineering, and Technology Workshops.

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About the City

About The City

The thriving global city of Berlin has been built up over the centuries around the River Spree. From the glass-domed capital building, Reichstag, get a panoramic view of the entire city below, brimming with universities, research institutes, orchestras, museums, festivals, and diverse architecture.

Berlin is Germany’s largest city and the capital of reunified Germany. It is home to roughly 3.5 million people, contains large amounts of green space and is surrounded by woodlands and lakes. At the crossroads between Eastern and Western Europe, Berlin is influenced by strong and, at times, conflicting political and cultural forces. Its response has been vibrant, creative and energetic, leading to reinvention at every turn. A result of relatively low living costs, excellent public transportation, and immediate local access to parks and playgrounds, Berlin is ranked among the top of global urban quality-of-life indices. Berlin is a city that showcases beautifully restored masterpieces side-by-side with modern ruins and new breathtaking architectural design and space. Due to its near total destruction at the close of WWII and subsequent occupation and division during the latter half of the 20th century, Berlin is a European capital with a unique urban morphology.

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Meet The Staff

Meet The Staff

Staff Image

Lukas Kronawitter

Lukas Kronawitter is an architect, planner, consultant, researcher and educator in multiple facets of sustainable urbanism. Lukas Kronawitter serves as the Director of Terreform One in Berlin as well as Academic Coordinator and Design Studio Professor with the CIEE Global Architecture and Design Program in Berlin. He has served as visiting Instructor at the Technical University of Berlin Department for Sustainable Planning and Urban Design. Lukas has consulted on a range of international projects including Ecocity development in Tianjin, Chaohu, and Zhenjiang in P.R. China, and environmental impact assessment on the new decentralized energy transmission grid. As a researcher at the HafenCity University of Hamburg Department for Sustainable Urban and Infrastructure Planning, Lukas co-authored the book “Water Sensitive Urban Design” published by Jovis and at the Technical University of Munich, Department for Building Construction and Materials Science Lukas was awarded the German Chancellor Fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation for his work on life cycle optimization of recyclable building materials. Additional honors include the Holcim Prize and presentations at the United Nations in New York and UNESCO in Paris.

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MIchael LaFond, Ph.D.

Michael A. LaFond, Ph.D, is a professor of the International Urban Management Master’s Program at the Technical University Berlin and is the director of id22: Institute for Creative Sustainability in Berlin. He holds a doctorate in urban design and planning from the University of Washington and has decades of experience in fields related to architecture and sustainable community development, urban design and planning, citizens initiatives, art, and urban culture. During his career, Michael has led a wide range of university, research, and teaching projects focused on self-organized, civil society-initiated, re-developments of vacant land and buildings, informal planning, innovative uses of environmental technologies, and democratizations of urban planning processes. He has partnered with the City of Berlin, the European Commission, and a large number of foundations. His work is focused on urban, international co-housing cultures – self-organized, community-oriented, inclusive, and sustainable forms of housing – as well as the exploration and development of convivial technologies.

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Benjamin Lorch

Community and Student Life Director

Benjamin Lorch is responsible for student experiential learning opportunities, including residential programming, events, external projects, and programs with the greater Berlin community. Benjamin is a double graduate of The University of Chicago, where he studied urban development policy, sociology and media. Prior to his work with CIEE, Benjamin served as head of communications for the Berlin School of Creative Leadership Executive MBA Program, and before that as managing director of the Chicago Public Schools – University of Chicago Internet Project. In 2006, upon being selected as a Robert Bosch Fellow, Benjamin returned to his ancestral German roots and moved to Berlin.

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Christian Tschersich, PhD

Key Faculty

Christian Tschersich was trained as architect at several Universities in Germany and the Netherlands. He graduated from KIT (Karslruhe Institute of Technology) with honors and as best of his class. After gaining experience as a designer working for smaller local offices (Volksbau, IRooms, Schmidt und Schmidt Generalplanung) Chris joined LAVA (Laboratory for Visionary Architecture). In 2013 Chris moved to the newly founded LAVA office in Berlin and since then is head of projects at LAVA Berlin. Since 2011 Chris holds a position as Senior Lecturer at KIT (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology), Department for Building Lífecycle Management (BLM). He is in charge of the curriculum and is teaching design studio and Seminars focusing on computational design. In addition he taught workshops and appeared as guest critic at the University of Karlsruhe and HFG Karlsruhe.

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Where You'll Study

Where You'll Study

GLOBAL INSTITUTE BERLIN

The CIEE Global Institute – Berlin is intentionally designed to connect you to your professors, your community, and your new international home. This U.S.-style residence combines the architectural charm of an old industrial factory with modern German design elements. A specific section of the facility is designated as “German language only,” to help foster a stronger commitment to language learning and cultural exchange. Access to the residence is carefully controlled through both on-site security staff and electronic keys. The Global Institute – Berlin campus features:

  • A spacious residence hall that features en-suite bathrooms, fully outfitted kitchens, laundry facilities, and comfortable lounges
  • Lecture and studio space customized for our programs
  • A café, courtyards, and gallery
  • An on-site Student Life Office
  • High-speed wi-fi
  • Access to convenient subway lines and bike paths
  • Close proximity to restaurants, shops, and landmarks
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Housing & Meals

Housing & Meals

Students live in an on-campus residence hall with a mix of CIEE students and resident assistants (RAs). Our RAs are local students who help CIEE students adjust to life in Berlin and are responsible for their safety and security. Students live in double, triple, or quad rooms with en-suite bathrooms and shower facilities. Students can prepare their own meals in full kitchens. CIEE provides basic cooking utensils and cleaning supplies. Students also may get coffee, tea, soft drinks, and snacks at the on-site CIEE café, or explore the many restaurants and cafés in the Kreuzberg neighborhood. Residence hall lounges allow students to mix and mingle over meals, cultural activities, study groups, and special events. Larger common areas, quiet study areas, and inner courtyards offer comfortable spaces to pass the time.

A limited number of students may also be housed in local shared apartments (meals not included), or in homestays (two meals a day included), depending on availability.

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Orientations

Orientations

The study abroad orientation program familiarizes students with the country, culture, and academic program, as well as provides practical information about living in Berlin. At the end of orientation, students will be familiar with their new surroundings, be settled into their accommodations, and have a strong support network. Ongoing support by study staff is provided on an individual and group basis throughout the program.

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Internet

Internet

Students are required to bring wireless-enabled laptops to use while on the program for both academic paper writing and studio work. Wireless Internet is available at the Global Institute--Berlin.

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Culture

Culture

Language Immersion

All CIEE students, regardless of language abilities, have the opportunity to learn German. Courses at several proficiency levels are available, and more advanced German speakers can take advantage of German-taught area studies courses. A specific section of the Global Institute residence is designated “German language only” to help foster a stronger commitment to language learning and cultural exchange.

CIEE staff can organize German language partners to help students practice and improve their German language skills. Additionally, for students with specific language acquisition goals, CIEE staff members can guide students to create individual community engagement plans to help them fulfill their objectives.

Cultural Activities and Site Visits

Throughout the semester, site visits to important Berlin locations will inform the teaching and learning. Woven through the curriculum are important buildings and sites that students will be asked to study and incorporate into their understanding of German architectural history, theory, and practical considerations when working on classroom and studio assignments. Research, data gathering, and recording will be an important part of site visits as a way of visually understanding spaces and structures and powerfully linking the eye, hand, and mind in the learning process. Examples include the East Side Gallery section of the Berlin Wall, the Holocaust Memorial, the Brandenburg Gate, and many more.

Overnight Excursions

Study-tours to other German cities such as Hamburg, Dresden, and Munich will illuminate the diversity of regional styles and histories. An excursion to an architecturally significant European city may also be made; possible destinations include Barcelona, where students may study alongside other Global Architecture and Design students at these locations. All optional and required co-curricular excursions are subject to change and will be announced after arrival in Berlin.

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Academics

Academics

The Global Architecture and Design curriculum in Berlin consists of three main components: Future Cites Design Studio, Future Cities Seminar, and the Science, Engineering, and Technology Workshop. Students take at least one CIEE elective course, and German is a popular option.

Courses are taught in English by CIEE-contracted faculty who also facilitate collaborative projects with local professionals and peers. Field trips to visit historical sites, new buildings, and environmental initiatives enhance students’ understanding of “cities in transition.”

Academic Culture

Utilizing an approach that is both interdependent and interdisciplinary, students are encouraged to inquire, debate, collaborate, conduct experiments, and rethink the potential of today’s architects and designers. The aim is to develop a language of technological design that can create immediacy between individual responsibility and the current global environmental crisis. Environmental problems are a crisis of human alienation from the natural world, and the initiative explores ways in which design can alleviate this unfortunate separation. What is required to comprehend globalism today is a close study of specific places, cities, and cultures. In order to create an educational experience that breeds cosmopolitanism, the Global Architecture and Design program in Berlin works with elements of history and tradition just as it takes full advantage of new technologies and the opportunities of global exchange.

Nature of Classes

All courses are CIEE courses and customized for CIEE students.

Language of Instruction

English

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Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

All Courses

Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be canceled due to insufficient enrollment.

CIEE Study Center Syllabi

To view the most recent syllabi for courses taught by CIEE at our Study Centers, visit our syllabi site.

Required CIEE Courses

ARCH 3001 GGAD
Future Cities Design Studio

For the first time in history, the majority of human population now lives in cities, a milestone that coincides with the awareness that earth’s systems are increasingly influenced by human activity. This studio supposes extreme solutions to an extreme predicament, asking the question: How will future cities simultaneously serve demanding human populations and support natural systems? The studio views the forms, systems, and technologies of the city collectively and synthesizes urban studies with the field of ecology. The host city is explored at multiple scales and students are guided by experts through scientific research and design experimentation towards radical but inspirational solutions for the future ecocity. Credit: 6 semester / 9 quarter hours.

ARCH 3002 GGAD
Future Cities Seminar

The course will study Berlin and its surroundings, for it is here that a rich variety of trendsetting projects of sustainable design can be experienced firsthand. These community development and building projects offer exciting solutions for public participation, the use of recycled energy, efficient lighting, natural materials, converted infrastructure, and ecological/political coordination. The students will visit a number of these projects during the scheduled fieldtrips. Credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

ARCH 3003 GGAD
Science, Engineering and Technology Workshops

In a series of hands-on workshops, students learn about tools and technologies with the capacity for profound impact and systemic change, especially in an age of urbanization and climate change. The course takes the position that future designers will need to create highly reactive and flexible environments. The course focuses on technologies that enable this: computational design, environmental simulation, advanced materiality, and rapid prototyping, and is organized in a survey to accommodate students with diverse interests and experience levels. Credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

Technical Requirements

Hardware Requirements:

    PC laptop (preferred)
    Macbook (partitioned with bootcamp)
    Intel i5 or i7 processor or AMD equivalent
    Open GL 2 video card or equivalent
    8GB of Ram minimum
    100 GB memory (internal and/or external)

Software Requirements

    Windows 7 or 8 64 bit OS is preferred
    MacBook Pro with Windows BootCamp (Please set up boot camp prior to arriving in Berlin as your university IT department can help you set this up)
    Rhino 5 64 bit on Windows (*not* MAC/OSX, use bootcamp) or latest version
    Grasshopper 3d 09.0075 or latest version
    Mesh Tools Add-On
    Mesh Edit Add-On
    Geco Add-On
    Multiple button mouse with scroll wheel

CIEE Elective Courses

ARCH3002 BRGE / URBS 3001 BRGE
German Architectural History and Theory

This course provides students with fundamental knowledge of the German architectural tradition through a historical survey of key buildings and urban spaces. Political, cultural, historical and technological factors will be closely studied as influences on the process of design and final built forms. The themes of creation and destruction, growing and shrinking cities and sustainability will run through this course. This course will also examine the worldwide influence of German architects with careful attention paid to distinctions between German and American styles and the interplay therein. Site visits throughout Berlin, drawing and photography will be used to sharpen the student’s eye for detail. Sites include, the buildings of Unter den Linden and the Museum Island (by Schinkel, Prussian classical), Tempelhof Airport (by Speer & Sagebiel fascist), Potsdamer Platz (by Jahn and Piano, modern). Guest lecturers and ongoing lectures at the UdK augment the curriculum. Credit 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

ARCH 3001 BERL
Monument, Memorial and Public Space in Germany (1919-Present)

This course looks at the important role that monuments, memorials and public spaces have played in Germany’s turbulent modern history. Weimar designs, Fascist Nazi designs and the stark contrasts between former-East and former-West German places and spaces are highlighted as expressions of cultural values and dictated doctrine shaped by the powerful and complex historical forces of war, politics, aesthetics and collective memory. In addition, postwar and post-Wall ruins and rebuilding efforts shed light on what today is saved, what is erased and what is honored on the German landscape. Particular attention is given to Holocaust memorials and places of remembrance. Themes of pride, shame, memory and collective consciousness run deeply through this course. Credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

HIST 3001 BRGE (ENG)
German History: 1871 to Present

This course examines the eventful and tumultuous decades of German history since the founding of the federal monarchy in 1871 under German Emperor Wilhelm I and Chancellor Otto von Bismarck. It investigates the Prussian and German Empires, World War I and resulting collapse of the monarchy, the promise and failings of the Weimar Republic accompanied by the rising political extremes of communism and fascism that gave way to the terror of Hitler and the Nazi Party. World War II and the accompanying murder of millions during the Holocaust resulted in total defeat for Germany, which then fell into forty years of occupation and division during the Cold War. As a result of the 1989 “peaceful revolution” East Germany rapidly collapsed. The fall of the Berlin Wall and reunification meant that the two Germanys (East and West) were once again one country accompanied by hopes, fears, benefits and continued challenges.

This course will ask central questions surrounding nation and nationalism, industrialization, governance, social policy, democracy, freedom and oppression. Students will be encouraged to reflect on the German experience as a nation “too big for Europe, but too small for the world.” Credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

HIST 3003 BRGE / GEST 3001 BRGE
Berlin: The Capital of the 20th Century

Berlin was the stage upon which the drama of the turbulent 20th century played out. In the 1920s, Berlin defined what it meant to be modern: it was the intellectual fulcrum of a liberal republic and a glamorous café society. But that republic was unstable, and soon a fascist government destroyed this atmosphere of tolerance and many of the great works of art and literature created by its talented freethinkers. After 1945, the bombed out city became a frontline of the Cold War, but with the fall of the Wall in 1989, Berlin began a new era as a center of creativity. Berlin’s fascinating and turbulent past make it the perfect place to study what 20th century modernity means, and what the future of modernity might hold. This course combines seminars and site visits to study the cultural and historical meaning and legacy of the 20th century using Berlin as a case study. Credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

GERM 1001 BRGE
German Language - Beginning I

German 1001 presumes no formal knowledge of German and provides an introduction to all elements of the German language. By way of a communicative approach – this course is taught primarily in German, but grammar instruction may be provided in English as we start out – you will learn to read, write, listen, and speak basic German. Additionally, you will gain familiarity with German-speaking cultures through exposure to various media and fun projects. This course will provide you with the basis for navigating a variety of simple situations in German. By the end of the semester, you should be able to speak and write in complete sen ences about where you live, family and friends, and what you like to do in your free time. You will master fundamental vocabulary pertaining to family, school, daily activities, telling time, travel, restaurants, professions, and more. You will be able to express preference and op nions in both the present and past tense. Additionally, you will receive a solid foundation in grammar points that you will use during all future study of German (verb conjugation, asking questions, word order, modal and two-way verbs, pronouns, possessive adjectives, prepositions, past perfect, future tense, no inative, accusative & dative cases). Credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

GERM 2001 BRGE
German Language – Intermediate I

Like our elementary courses, this class is designed to practice and improve all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in a highly communicative classroom setting. We will systematically review grammar and deepen our understanding thereof, but will do so in the context of working with and through materials designed to introduce you to German culture. Credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

GERM 3001 BRGE
German Language – Advanced I

This class is designed for advanced learners of German language. It will review and deepen students’ knowledge of German grammar with an increasing focus on stylistics in both oral and written speech. Students will read, write and perform in a variety of genres and do so in a way that helps students to better understand their German environment and exposes them to the rich cultural life of the city of Berlin. Taking advantage of the location, students will go on short field trips, try out their German with native informants and German students, and create presentations about current events in the city. Credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

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Berlin Future Cities Studio Fall 2014
Berlin Future Cities Studio 2014
CIEE Go Far Win Big Sweeps Contest
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