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By Term

  • Fall 2014
  • Spring 2014
  • Spring 2015
  • Academic year 2014-2015
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Dates:
08/20/2014 - 12/18/2014
Deadlines:
Extended to: 04/15/2014
Credit:
15 semester / 22.5 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.9 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
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Dates:
01/08/2014 - 05/24/2014
Deadlines:
10/01/2013
Credit:
15 semester / 22.5 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.9 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
TBA
Deadlines:
10/01/2014
Credit:
15 semester / 22.5 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.9 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
08/20/2014 - TBA
Deadlines:
Extended to: 04/15/2014
Credit:
see credit information below
Eligibility:
2.9 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
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Study Abroad in Seville
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Program Overview

Program Overview

Advance your Spanish language skills while pursuing coursework in international business in a city rich in history and culture—Seville.

Whether you’re an accomplished Spanish student or an absolute beginner, studying abroad in Seville offers you language instruction, area studies electives, and a host of courses in economics, finance, marketing, and management that give you international perspective and experience.

Study abroad in Seville and you will:

  • Explore local culture through activities and excursions to sites of cultural importance in and around Seville and Spain, as well as a trip to Morocco
  • Visit a number of Spanish companies and organizations
  • Develop intercultural competency skills via the CIEE Intercultural Communication in Context course
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The CIEE Difference

The CIEE Difference

Coursework

No Spanish language experience? No problem. Choose from a variety of language study and international business courses, offered in both English and Spanish, exploring topics like the functioning of the European economy, foreign exchange markets, role of strategic business management in a globalized world, and marketing across linguistic and cultural borders.

What’s more, you’ll have access to coursework in subjects ranging from history and literature to communications and the social and natural sciences.

Immersion

Study abroad in Seville provides various activities and programs to help integrate you into the local and university communities, including volunteer opportunities, a conversation exchange, intramural sports, and outings to the cinema with local students.

study abroad in Spain

Excursions

Enjoy a number of day-long and extended excursions to points of interest in and around Seville that highlight topics covered in class. This also includes a four-day field trip to Morocco where you’ll explore social, religious, and economic differences between your host country and this developing North African nation.

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Dates, Deadlines & Fees

Dates, Deadlines & Fees

We want to make sure you get the most out of your experience when you study abroad with CIEE, which is why we offer the most inclusions in our fees.

The program fee includes:

  • Tuition and housing
  • Pre-departure advising and optional on-site airport meet and greet
  • Full-time program leadership and support
  • Field trips and cultural activities
  • CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits
Please note, program dates are subject to change. Please contact your CIEE Study Abroad Advisor before purchasing airfare. Click the button to view more detailed information about dates and fees as well as estimated additional costs. Please talk with your University Study Abroad Advisor about additional fees that may be charged by your home institution when participating in a program abroad.
Program
Application Due
Start Date
End Date
Costs
Fall 2014 (17 wks)
Extended to: 04/15/2014
08/20/2014
12/18/2014
$15,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$11,998
Housing ***
$3,450
Insurance
$102

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Includes all Meals

Estimated Additional Costs

International Airfare *
$1,250
Local Transportation
$300
Books & Supplies
$250
Visa Fees
$160
Potential travel to consulate for visa
$500
Personal expenses
$2,800

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring 2014 (19 wks)
10/01/2013
01/08/2014
05/24/2014
$15,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$11,998
Housing ***
$3,450
Insurance
$102

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Includes all Meals

Estimated Additional Costs

International Airfare *
$1,250
Local Transportation
$300
Books & Supplies
$250
Visa Fees
$160
Potential travel to consulate for visa
$500
Personal expenses
$2,800

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring 2015
10/01/2014
TBA
TBA

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

Estimated Additional Costs

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

More Information
Academic year 2014-2015
Extended to: 04/15/2014
08/20/2014
TBA
$30,100

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$22,798
Housing ***
$6,900
Insurance
$102

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** All meals included in Homestay. Students in the residencia option have all meals included except Sunday lunches and meals during breaks/national holidays. No meals are included for students in apartments.

Estimated Additional Costs

International Airfare *
$1,250
Local Transportation
$600
Books & Supplies
$500
Visa Fees
$160
Potential travel to consulate for visa
$500
Personal expenses
$5,600

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
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Eligibility
2.9 Overall GPA

Eligibility

  • Overall GPA 2.9
  • 0–4 semesters of college-level Spanish or equivalent
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Recommended Credit

Recommended Credit

Total recommended credit and a full course load for the semester program is 15 semester/22.5 quarter hours and 30 semester/45 quarter hours for the academic year. Students may take up to 18 total credits for the semester.

Contact hours for the Intensive Session are 45 hours and recommended credit is 3 semester/ 4.5 quarter hours.

Course contact hours for regular session classes are 45 hours and recommended credit is 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours per course, unless otherwise indicated.

Science classes with labs included.

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Program Requirements

Program Requirements

Study abroad students take one language course during the Intensive Session, which takes place the first few weeks of the semester. Upon completion of the Intensive Session, students take one Spanish language class at their level, and three additional courses from the UPO courses for international students or the optional CIEE course, Intercultural Communication. Students may take up to five classes during the regular session.

Students at the beginning/elementary Spanish level will choose either the intensive six credit beginning Spanish course (to maximize language acquisition during the semester) or the three credit elementary Spanish course. Students that opt for the three credit elementary language course are strongly encouraged to also take the one credit language laboratory which meets one hour/week, providing students at the elementary level with additional Spanish speaking and pronunciation practice.

Depending on course availability, students may also choose to take regular university classes taught in English with Spanish students. Students who test into the Advanced Level on the UPO placement exam are required to take at least one content course in Spanish. Students who test into the Advanced Level II are required to take all classes in Spanish. Auditing classes (not for credit) is also possible. Information is available on site for interested students.

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About the City

About The City

Capital of Andalusia, Seville was one of the last footholds of the Moorish empire that ruled the Iberian Peninsula. It is home to the ingenious barber of Seville and the tempestuous Carmen. The great Renaissance painters Velázquez and Murillo were born here, and Ferdinand and Isabel ruled Spain from the royal apartments in the Alcazar Palace. Though the city preserves its past, modern Seville is the commercial hub of Andalusia. For a city of fewer than 800,000, Seville offers amazing cultural activities, from flamenco to classical, pop, and jazz concerts.

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Meet The Staff

Meet The Staff

Staff Image

Alayna Brown

Alayna Brown is the Resident Coordinator of IBPC. She completed her undergraduate work in Psychology at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. She studied abroad with CIEE in Seville and married her intercambio! She is pursuing her MA cross-cultural communication and education. She participated in a professional development staff exchange at Macalester College.

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When you make the decision to study abroad, you think you are prepared for what awaits, but once you arrive and live the experience, you’ll find that your entire frame of reference, sense of self, and cultural awareness will change, and impact you for the rest of your life. The International Business and Culture program gives you the opportunity to study abroad in the amazing city of Seville, which is so rich in history and culture, even if you have little or no knowledge of the Spanish language. You will have the opportunity to further develop your Spanish language skills, while taking business and Spanish culture courses in English or Spanish.

— Alayna Brown, Resident Coordinator

Staff Image

Jaime Ramirez

Jaime Ramírez is the Center Director for the CIEE Study Center in Seville. A native sevillano, he earned his B.A. from the Universidad de Sevilla in Business Administration and M.B.A. at the Instituto Internacional San Telmo. Jaime participated in CIEE´s Internship USA, working for 4 months at the CIEE headquarters in Portland, Maine. He has also participated in several professional development staff exchanges with Georgetown University and the University of Colorado at Boulder. Jaime has been with CIEE since 2004 and is currently pursuing doctoral studies in Work and Organizational Psychology.

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Where You'll Study

Where You'll Study

With nearly 11,000 students, the Universidad Pablo de Olavide (UPO) is the second state run university in Seville. It is located on a 345-acre campus, a 30-minute metro or bus ride from the center of the city. UPO offers both undergraduate and graduate programs in traditional majors, as well as in biotechnology, environmental sciences, humanities, labor relations, second language acquisition, social work, sports sciences, and translation. Its facilities are equipped with the latest in technology, including campus-wide Internet access, computer, television, video and audio centers, an open access library, sports facilities, and science laboratories.

CIEE Study Center

The CIEE Study Center is located in a beautifully renovated Sevillano palace built in 1725. It is centrally located, close to the Puerta de la Carne, and is a 30-minute ride by bus or metro from the Universidad Pablo de Olavide campus. Housed in the CIEE Study Center are classrooms, computer room, student services, and CIEE administration. CIEE professors also have an office in the Study Center, so that students may speak with them privately about issues related to their progress in class.

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Housing & Meals

Housing & Meals

study abroad in Spain

Housing, all meals, and laundry services are included in the study abroad program fee. Students may live alone or with a roommate in Spanish-speaking private homes. Students will always have their own room in the homestay. Students live within walking distance of a metro or bus stop and should expect a 30-minute ride, by either mode, to the UPO campus. A transportation stipend is included in the program fee.

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Orientations

Orientations

You'll begin your study abroad experience in Seville even before leaving home by participating in a CIEE online pre-departure orientation. Meeting with students online, the resident director shares information about the program and site, highlighting issues that alumni have said are important, and giving you time to ask questions. The online orientation allows you to connect with others in the group, reflect on what you want to get out of the program, and learn what others in the group would like to accomplish. CIEE’s aim for the pre-departure orientation is simple—to help you understand more about the program, and identify your objectives so that you arrive well-informed and return home having made significant progress towards your goals.

The mandatory weeklong orientation session, conducted in Seville at the beginning of the program, introduces you to the country, culture, and academic program, as well as provides practical information about living in Spain. It includes both structured activities and independent sightseeing. Ongoing support is provided by CIEE staff on an individual and group basis throughout the program.

Students also participate in a mandatory orientation session held on the UPO campus.

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Internet

Internet

You are encouraged to bring a wireless-enabled laptop. All homestays have Internet connections. The CIEE Study Center and UPO both offer wireless access. Internet access is also available in the UPO library and computer labs. Computers at the CIEE Study Center are also available for academic purposes. The city of Seville has many wireless Internet “hot spots,” and wireless access is widely available in many eateries.

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Culture

Culture

study abroad in Spain

The academic program is supplemented with excursions to points of interest in Seville, highlighting topics covered in class. The study abroad program also includes a four-day field trip to Morocco where you will experience the cultural, religious, social, and economic differences of this developing North African country. An e-newsletter, Noticias desde Sevilla, is sent out to students every week. It announces happenings around Seville and the cultural activities CIEE has planned to complement academic work.

University Life

In addition to CIEE-organized activities, you can also participate in activities organized by the UPO Center for Foreign Students. A sampling includes Intercambio events, Spanish and English tables, and outings to the cinema with Spanish students. There is a wide range of general student activities for all UPO students. Some include individual and team sports, campus gym, flamenco dance, guitar lessons, volunteerships, and a university choir.

Immersion

Intercambios

A conversation exchange program with Spanish students is an important part of the program. Intercambios give you the chance to practice what you are learning in the language courses, as well as help you become more integrated into Spanish student life, and Sevillano life and culture.

Community Involvement

You'll have the opportunity to work with children and the elderly, as well as other humanitarian associations. You may also become involved in such international organizations as Amnesty International. Volunteer teaching opportunities in local schools are also available.

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Academics

Academics

Founded in 2005, the CIEE International Business and Culture study abroad program is geared to students with beginning to intermediate level language skills who wish to improve their Spanish language skills while taking a wide variety of courses for diverse majors in English. In addition to Spanish courses, students can fulfill home school requirements in such other areas as international relations, psychology, business, history, literature, and science, among others. These courses for international students are noted in the courses section.

Online Placement Exam

Prior to departure for Seville, all students are required to take a CIEE online placement exam during the scheduled exam period: mid-November to mid-December for the spring semester and mid-May to mid-June for the fall semester. The purpose of this exam is to determine the student’s level of Spanish so that they are placed in appropriate language courses. Students should take this exam seriously, as placement in many upper-level courses depends upon a high online placement exam score.

Writing Center and Tutorials

CIEE has a writing center staffed by language professors and Spanish students majoring in Spanish philology. CIEE organizes tutorials for students to help them in reading, writing, comprehension, and speaking, which may help them progress more readily in those content courses taught exclusively in Spanish.

Academic Culture

The study abroad program is located on the UPO campus, where all classes meet during the regular University session. Intensive Session classes meet at the CIEE Study Center.

CIEE and UPO courses for international students are small and interactive. These courses also include visits to the theater, cinema, and other local monuments. Participation is an important component of the grade.

Classes are scheduled Monday through Thursday and most meet two times a week. Students may have academic commitments on Fridays such as class excursions and language tutorials.

UPO courses for international students offered during the fall semester finish before Christmas and in the spring end in late May. The optional CIEE Intercultural Communication course follows the same calendar.

During the fall, there is no extended vacation period during the semester. During the spring, two vacation periods take place at the University: Semana Santa and Feria de Abril. The dates are not fixed, but students are normally free the week before Easter (Holy Week) and then again for a week approximately two weeks after Easter.

While extracurricular activities and personal travel contribute to the student’s experience, attendance in class is mandatory. Friday is considered part of the academic week. Early departure for or late return from vacations is not allowed. Any extended travel should take place prior to the start of the program, during the vacation periods, or upon completion of the program.

Nature of Classes

CIEE classes are with other CIEE study abroad students only. UPO courses for international students are with other American and international students and not with Spanish students. Students with a very advanced level of Spanish do have the possibility of taking regular university classes with Spanish students.

CIEE Community Language Commitment

As students gain proficiency in Spanish, resident staff encourage them to use their language skills in everyday settings. The more students participate, the more a community that contributes to Spanish language proficiency and understanding of Spanish society develops.

Grading System

In CIEE courses, as well as UPO courses for international students and regular University courses, students are generally graded on the basis of mid-term and final examinations, class participation, papers, student presentations, and attendance. Numerical grades are given based on a 10-point scale and converted to the U.S. grading scale.

Language of Instruction

English
Spanish

Faculty

All courses are taught by highly qualified professionals, most of whom are professors at UPO.

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Course Description

Course Description

All Courses

Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be cancelled due to insufficient enrollment.

CIEE Study Center Syllabi

To view the most recent syllabi for courses taught by CIEE at our Study Centers, visit our syllabi site.

Required CIEE Language Courses—Intensive Session

Students are placed in one of the following courses based on the online placement exam results and the last level of Spanish taken prior to arrival. The goal of the Intensive Language program is to immerse students in the Spanish language in preparation for regular session language classes at the UPO.

SPAN 3503 IBCP

Intensive Pre-Advanced Spanish I is only offered if there are students at the advanced Spanish level according to the CIEE online placement exam.

SPAN 1503 IBCP

Intensive Pre-Elementary Spanish I
Designed for students with no or very basic knowledge of Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in order to provide students the necessary linguistic tools to live and study in Seville.

SPAN 1504 IBCP

Intensive Pre-Elementary Spanish II
Designed for students with an elementary understanding of Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in order to provide students the necessary linguistic tools to live and study in Seville.

SPAN 2503 IBCP

Intensive Pre-Intermediate Spanish I
For students who have studied Spanish previously and are at the intermediate level. Students work to increase their vocabulary and improve their communicative skills in Spanish.

SPAN 2504 IBCP

Intensive Pre-Intermediate Spanish II
Previous Spanish students who are at the upper-intermediate level. Students work to increase their vocabulary and improve their communicative skills in Spanish.

SPAN 3503 IBCP

Intensive Pre-Advanced Spanish I
For students entering the program with four semesters of college level Spanish, or the equivalent. The objective of this course is to enhance the ability of students to understand written and oral materials so that they can communicate successfully in Spanish.

CIEE Optional Course

COMM 3002 IBCP

Intercultural Communication in Context
(In English)
In this class, students concentrate on the complexities and challenges of interacting in culturally diverse environments. Students explore theories related to intercultural communication and are expected to apply learned concepts and theories to personal experiences, social interactions, and observations during their semester in Spain. This course concentrates primarily on developing skills to interact effectively and appropriately in intercultural contexts, with particular focus on the host culture. Guest speakers and/or visits to culturally relevant destinations may be included in the class.

Universidad Pablo de Olavide

Courses for International Students

Required Semester Language Courses

Students are placed in one of the following courses for the remainder of the semester based upon the intensive language class placement and language levels taken prior to arrival.

Elementary Spanish I and II—Intensive Course
This beginning intensive course is designed for students with a very basic Spanish knowledge. Emphasis is on building oral and written communication skills and on acquiring knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world. Recommended credit: 6 semester/9 quarter hours. Contact hours: 90.

Elementary Spanish II
This beginning course is designed for students with an elementary Spanish knowledge. Emphasis is on building oral and written communication skills and acquiring knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world.

Intermediate Spanish I
Designed for students with an intermediate level of Spanish. Emphasis is on expanding vocabulary and building oral and written communication skills, as well as acquiring a greater awareness of the Spanish-speaking world.

Intermediate Spanish II
For students with an upper-intermediate level of Spanish, emphasis is on expanding vocabulary and building oral and written communication skills, as well as acquiring a greater awareness of the Spanish-speaking world.

Spanish Conversation—Intermediate
The objective of this class is to develop conversational comprehension and oral interaction skills for students at the intermediate level. The focus is on form in order to attain fluency and effective communication skills.

Spanish Laboratory
This one credit course is designed to complement the elementary Spanish classes and aims to improve oral communication skills. Guided conversations such as role play, theater, and so on serve to increase language competence. Sessions in the language laboratory focuses on addressing specific pronunciation difficulties. Contact hours: 15. Recommended credit: 1 semester/1.5 quarter hours.

Spanish Reading and Composition—Intermediate
Designed for students who have had two semesters of university-level Spanish, this course continues to develop reading and writing skills through written reports, compositions, and class discussions on assigned topics and articles. It also reviews more advanced grammar with the purpose of achieving greater accuracy.

Spanish Language Courses-Advanced

Advanced Spanish I
This course is designed for students who have had at least four semesters of university level Spanish. Emphasis is placed on applying the skills acquired at the intermediate level to further improve oral and written skills. The methodology applied is communicative and encompasses assignments, which include grammar reviews, cultural readings on Spain, and debates that require use of practical and communicative vocabulary.

Advanced Spanish II
This course is designed for students who have had four or more semesters of university-level Spanish. The course focuses on written and oral expression of Spanish through compositions, oral reports, and class discussions. Material for discussion includes literary texts, as well as topics of general interest. Emphasis is on interactive language use, vocabulary expansion, and accuracy of expression.

Spanish Conversation-Advanced
The objective of this class is to develop conversational, comprehension, and oral interaction skills for students at the advanced level with focus on form to attain fluency and effective communication skills.

Spanish for Business
In this course, students learn the vocabulary and concepts used in oral and written translations in the business world. Emphasis is placed on increasing vocabulary and using Spanish business terminology in commercial correspondence including letters, job descriptions, advertisements, bank documents, and so on. Cultural differences which affect the way business is conducted in Spain and in the U.S. is also explored. This course is for students at the upper-intermediate or advanced Spanish level.

Spanish-English/English-Spanish InterpretationTechniques
(In Spanish—spring only)
This course introduces students to basic theories and modalities of interpreting and provides them training in interpretation techniques from Spanish into English, and vice versa, in the fields of tourism, health, and the judicial system. The course is for students with an advanced level of Spanish and is very practical in nature. (advanced Spanish required)

Spanish-English/English-Spanish Translations
(In Spanish)
This course provides an introduction to translation from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Particular attention is given to the linguistic issues involved in translation. Short literary works, as well as articles, are translated as a practical part of the course. Special emphasis is placed on Spanish idioms and their translation. (Advanced Spanish required)

Spanish Phonetics and Phonology
(In Spanish)
This course examines the sound system of Spanish and concentrates on improving pronunciation. Emphasis is placed on the peculiarities of Andalusian Spanish. Class work includes transcriptions and intonation exercises. (advanced Spanish required)

Spanish Pragmatics and Communication
(In Spanish)
In this course we learn and apply basic concepts in pragmatics to verbal and non-verbal communicative acts in Spanish. We also study related aspects in politeness and miscommunication using Spanish. (advanced Spanish required)

Spanish Reading and Composition—Advanced
This class is designed for students who have had at least four semesters of university-level Spanish. It continues the development of reading and writing skills through written reports, compositions, and class discussions on assigned topics and articles. It also reviews more advanced grammar with the purpose of achieving greater accuracy.

Spanish Culture Up Close
(In English—fall only)
This course offers a panoramic overview of the sociocultural idiosyncracy of Spain nowadays. Considering the volunteer experience students will have to take part in as an essential part of the course, special relevance will be given to the study of the management of time, space, and interpersonal relations in Spain, within the theoretical framework of intercultural communication studies.

Biology Courses

Biochemistry
(In English)
This course looks at the structure of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, enzyme catalysis and principles of metabolism including glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. A comparison is also made between English and Spanish scientific expressions.

Ecological Systems
(In English)
This course examines ecology and its large-scale patterns and processes, both from an Iberian general perspective, the elements of time and space in the ecosystem, regulatory elements, and the application of ecological principles in solving environmental problems.

Anatomy and Physiology
(In English—fall only)
This course provides an anatomical and physiological overview of human structure and function. Human gross anatomy and histology is related to cell, tissue, and organ level physiology for each of the major body systems. Topics include the musculoskeletal and central nervous systems as well as cardiovascular, renal, and endocrine systems. The class requires lab work. Recommended 4 semester credits.

Microbiology
(In English—fall only)
This course is an introduction for students to basic concepts and unifying principles of microbiology. The goal of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the general concepts in microbiology, as well as inform them about the general practices used clinically to identify and treat the most common infectious agents. The course is oriented towards the clinical aspects of microbiology, but does introduce historically significant discoveries to convey important topics. The labs are designed to familiarize students with aseptic methods of microbiological techniques and its applications in clinical and environmental microbiolgy. A previous course in physiology and anatomy is required to take this class. Recommended 4 semester credits.

Organic Chemistry I
(In English—fall only)
Organic chemistry is the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. CHE 210 is the first half of a comprehensive one-year course suitable for science majors. The first semester course includes structural and functional aspects of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons with various heteroatom functionalities. Discussion focuses on the mechanistic basis for organic compound reactivity. First semester laboratories concentrate on the basic techniques and procedures used in organic syntheses and separations, including microscale techniques. In addition, modern analytical techniques (e.g. infrared spectroscopy) used in the identification of organic compounds will be discussed. Lab work is included for this class. Recommended credit: 5 semester credits

Organic Chemistry II
(In English—spring only)
A continuation of CHE 210 with focus on complex chemical reactions and syntheses utilizing fundamental principles. The study of mechanistic functional group chemistry will be a primary focus. Second semester laboratory extends previously learned macro- and micro-scale techniques to more complex systems and explores chemistry discussed in the lecture portion of the course. In addition, modern analytical techniques (e.g. nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry) used in the identification of organic compounds will be discussed. Lab work is included for this class. Recommended credit: 5 semester credits.

Psychology courses

Cultural Psychology
(In English—fall only)
In this globalized world, it is important to understand how individuals in other cultures think, feel, and behave, and the forces, beliefs, and motivations that guide their behavior. This course will focus on topics in personality, social, developmental, and health psychology, and will encourage an appreciation for the diversity of cultures and how culture influences behavior.

Social Psychology
(In English—spring only)
This course will provide an overview of theory and empirical research in social psychology, with topics including social cognition, the social self, attitudes and persuasion, prejudice and inter-group relations, social influence and intra-group relations, attraction and interpersonal relationships, aggression, and prosocial behavior.

Business and Economics Courses

The European Union
(In English)
This course analyzes the initial motives behind the creation of the European Community and its development into the European Union with a unique institutional structure. There is a study of the EU’s key common policies—economic and monetary union, competition, agriculture, external trade—and their global effects, with special attention paid to EU/U.S. relations.

The European Union and the Economy of the Euro
(In Spanish)
This course aims to introduce the student to the functioning of the European economy. While it focuses mainly on the economy, it also examines the historical, political, and social aspects which are key to understanding the European process of integration.

The Global Economy
(In English)
This class explores the main debates surrounding the nature, effects, and attempted management of the global economy. Special attention is paid to the role of such international organizations as the IMF and the WTO, as well as moves towards economic regional integration (EU, NAFTA, Mercosur). NOTE: A previous economics course is highly recommended.

International Finance
(In English and Spanish)
The objective of the course is to introduce the student to the complex world of international finance. Topics include the increasing globalization of financial markets, international and European monetary systems, foreign exchange markets, and direct and indirect international investment. Offered in Spanish when minimum enrollment is met.

International Management
(In English)
This class examines the process of internationalization of companies, alternative forms of international business, and international alliances (exports, franchises, subsidiaries, licenses, strategic alliances, joint ventures). The class also looks at environmental factors, globalization, management functions, human resources and diversity, different organizational cultures, and the role of strategic business management in a globalized world.

International Marketing
(In Spanish and English)
This is an introductory course in international marketing. Topics include analytical techniques used in international market research, determining prices and distribution channels in an international context, and marketing across linguistic and cultural borders.

Communications Courses

Intercultural Communication
(In Spanish)
This course is designed to give participants a solid understanding of what intercultural communication is, how to benefit from it, and how to manage it in our personal and future professional lives. Using an interdisciplinary focus, we examine values, customs, and communication styles of cultural groups and we learn to interpret communicative behavior of others. A special emphasis is placed on the Spanish form of communication.

History of Art and Cinema Courses

History of Spanish Art
(In English)
This course is a survey of major works of art from prehistoric times through the present. Painting, sculpture, and architecture are examined in the context of their time and place in history. Special attention is given to the art and culture of Seville.

History of Spanish Art: From the Renaissance to the 20th Century
(In Spanish)
This class is a survey of major works of art from the Renaissance period to the 20th century. Painting, sculpture, and architecture are examined in the context of their time and place in history. Special attention is given to the art and culture of Seville.

History of Spanish Cinema During the Democracy
(In Spanish)
Spanish cinema underwent an important transformation following the death of Franco in 1975 and the ensuing democracy. During these last 30 years, Spanish cinema has become a stronger player on the European scene and has gained a level of recognition unthinkable only a few decades ago. This course analyzes the historical evolution of the period, as well as introduces students to Spanish films up to the present time.

History Courses

Ancient and Medieval Spanish History: From Altamira to Isabella and Ferdinand
(Prehistory to 1500)

(In English—fall only)
The main goal of this course is to give students an overview of Spanish history and culture, with special emphasis on events that have marked Andalusia more profoundly from the dawn of history to the 16th century.

Contemporary History of Spain
(In Spanish)
This course presents the main historic processes from the 18th century to the present that have been crucial in shaping present-day Spain. It examines the creation of democracy, the genesis of the nationalist problem, and the economic articulation of Spain in the international context.

Early Modern and Modern Spanish History: From Isabella and Ferdinand to the Euro
(1450—the present)

(In English—spring only)
The main goal in this course is to give students an overview of Spanish history over the past 500 years, with special emphasis on events that have marked Andalusia more profoundly. The course also studies and analyzes different trends and phenomena of modern-day Spain, along with some traditions that still occur. Field trips, slide projections, and videos are key elements to help students gain a clearer perception of each period.

History of Spain
(In English)
This course provides an overview of Spanish history from Roman times to the modern era, including the Arab invasion and Christian Reconquest, Spain’s monarchy, and Spain’s society and identity from 1936 to the present. The role of the church, women, social classes, and nationalism are discussed.

The Mediterranean World and Spain
(In Spanish)
The objective of this class is to investigate the intimate relationship between the Mediterranean world and Spain during the creation of the Spanish culture (from pre-history until the Arab invasion). Several field trips to places of historic interest are an important part of this course.

Slavery in Latin America and the Caribbean
(In Spanish)
The course aims to study the origins of inequality, racial prejudice, and poverty that plague a large percentage of African American communities in Latin America and the Caribbean. It examines how some cultural patterns of African origin persist, focusing on music, clothing, and such religious beliefs as witchcraft and voodoo. It also offers a global perspective of the phenomenon of slavery from the introduction of the first slaves to its abolition.

Literature Courses

Contemporary Spanish Literature
(In Spanish)
This course analyzes Spanish literature of the 19th and 20th centuries and the literary movements of Romanticism, Modernism, “La Generación de 98,” “La Generación de 27,” and the most current trends in Spanish literature. Students study the literary aspects as they relate to cultural and historic events that influence or have influenced various literary trends.

The Latin American Short Story
(In Spanish)
This course analyzes the beginnings of the short story in Latin America in the 20th century and its subsequent development, revising the different styles and literary movements that take place over time and the extraordinary contribution of women writers to the genre. The complex social, political, and cultural realities are studied as they are reflected in the Latin American short story. The stories of Horacio Quiroga, Modernism, Criollismo, Magical Realism, and the most recent literary tendencies are examined.

Panorama of Latin America Literature 1 (Pre-1820)
(In Spanish—fall only)
This course is an overview of Latin American writings from the pre-Hispanic period until the eve of the Independence movements in the 1820s. It includes literary works in poetry and non-fiction, such as the chronicles of conquest. It also features a selection of literary works (including prose, drama, and essay) that have received recognition from specialists and the general reading public for being the most outstanding in Latin America.

Panorama of Latin America Literature 2 (Post-1820)
(In Spanish—spring only)
This course is an overview of Latin American writings from the Independence era to the present. It includes literary works in poetry and non-fiction, including novel, short story, poetry, and essay. One major objective is to achieve a knowledge of how these works fit into the framework of Latin America's cultural and intellectual history.

Spanish Literature: The Spanish Golden Age: El Quijote
(In Spanish—spring only)
The objective of this course is to study the masterpiece of the Spanish literary work: Don Quijote. Cervantes’ novel is considered to be the first modern novel and its influence in later literary productions is still present in the creative process for most authors. The course analyzes the structural, thematic, and stylistic characteristics of the novel, as well as presents the study of the novel as a cultural product, so as to present an in-depth study of Cervantes's world.

Women and Literature
(in Spanish—spring only)
This course analyzes the role of women in Spanish literature in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as the literary works written specifically by women during both centuries. It is mainly during Romanticism that women begin to take an active role in literature and by the middle of the 20th century women have the liberty to express themselves and their vision of reality through the world of fiction.

Imaginaries of Spain Through Literature
(In Spanish)
The role of literature has been crucial in the articulation of the different imaginaries of Spain. In this course, we will analyze how reflections on the Arab legacy and the intellectual debates about bullfighting and flamenco have been used in literary works as a means to represent the complexity of Spain’s cultural identity. We will focus on the creation of la España castiza versus la España heterodoxa and how this confrontation has been articulated through la España colorista of the Romantic travellers, la España negra, la España de la República y del exilio, la España del franquismo, la España de la transición, and la España de la democracia. Paintings and films, as well as philosophical, historical, and political essays will also be included.

Political Science Courses

Contemporary Spanish Politics
(In English)
This class introduces students to the contemporary Spanish political system. It examines the process of the transition to democracy from an authoritarian regime. With the adoption of the new Spanish constitution, the course looks at political institutions, political parties, autonomous regions, the monarchy, the Catholic Church, and the military. Special emphasis is placed on changing socioeconomic factors, nationalism, immigration, and terrorism.

Current Affairs in Latin America: Press and Cinema
(In Spanish)
This class aims to promote active class discussion while increasing the student’s knowledge of the social, political, and cultural life of present-day Latin America. Teaching material includes top stories from the Latin American press, as well as from Latin American film.

Programs Aimed to Fight Poverty and Social Exclusion in the European Union
(In Spanish—spring only)
This class studies the present state of poverty and social exclusion in the European Union with special emphasis on Spain and Andalusia. It looks at social action initiatives on the individual and group level, as well as experimental programs and their effectiveness.

Relations Between the U.S. and the Latin World
(In Spanish—spring only)
The objective of this course is to give the student a global perspective of the relations between the United States, Spain, and Latin America throughout history. It also examines the series of problems that have shaped the character of inter-American relations, the mechanisms of economic integration, and its repercussions in the sociopolitical sphere.

U.S.-European Relations Since World War II
(In English)
The objectives of this course are twofold: first, to examine the tensions that arose between the states on both sides of the Atlantic following the defeat of Germany in 1945; and second, its transformation into economic, political, and military cooperation. This cooperation has assured the stability of liberal democracies and consolidates the dependence of the Old Continent on a strengthened U.S.

The Road to Democracy in Portugal, Greece, and Spain
(In English)
During the second half of the 1970's, Southern Europe inaugurated the "third wave of democratization." This course approaches that crucial period of Portuguese, Greek, and Spanish history with a comparative methodology. The course will analyze the nature of authoritarian regimes, as well as the transition to and consolidation of democracies.

Historical Ties Between Spain and the U.S.
(In English—spring only)
This course offers a historical overview of the relations between Spain and the United States up to the present day. Starting with the Spanish colonial rule and surviving legacy in the southern and western U.S., following with Spain's role during the War of Independence, and ending with the 1898 Spanish-American War and U.S. relations with Franco and democratic Spain, students will become aware of the strong ties that exist between both nations.

Women in Europe
(In Spanish)
This course provides an exploration of the history of European women and gender in the modern era, focusing on women’s changing roles in the political, economic, social, and intellectual spheres, and the development of new visions of family and sexuality.

Spanish Culture Courses

History of Flamenco in Spain: Theory and Practice
(In Spanish)
This course immerses students in the world of Flamenco and its artistic forms beginning with the geographic, historical, and socio-cultural context of its origins. Flamenco’s evolution into an artistic professional activity is examined by studying the most well-known Flamenco singers, dancers, and guitar players. Musicians from a Flamenco music group demonstrate the various forms of Flamenco during the practical portion of the course.

Medieval Spain: Christians, Jews, and Muslims
(In Spanish)
The main objective of this course is to offer a panorama of medieval Spanish history (711–1492) and bring students closer to medieval society and the groups that formed it. The course examines the medieval legacy and the importance of the contributions of Arab and Jewish cultures to the history of Spain. Students also study medieval Seville and the influence of this historic period on its current urban features.

Spanish Civilization and Culture
(In Spanish and English)
This course discusses Spain’s multicultural civilization from its Roman roots to the movida of post-Franco Spain. Recurrent themes in Spanish national ideology and culture are examined. These include Spain as a crossroads of Christian, Jewish, and Islamic cultures; linguistic and cultural diversity; regionalism and nationalism; and dictatorship and democracy.

Spanish Culture and History through Film
(In English—spring only)
This course presents a general introduction to the main aspects of Spanish culture and history through cinematographic representation in various films. The class covers the main social, political, and economic aspects of Spanish life from the beginning of the 20th century through today, with special emphasis on current affairs.

Universidad Pablo de Olavide Business Courses—Direct Enrollment Courses

The following courses, taught in English, are courses offered by the Universidad Pablo de Olavide School of Business. The student population in these courses consists of Universidad Pablo de Olavide business majors and international students. The Universidad Pablo de Olavide may change course offerings based on enrollment after students arrive. International Business and Culture students cannot pre-enroll in these course, but can keep them in mind as possible class options. Students interested in these courses should thoroughly review the course syllabus. International Business and Culture students can enroll in a maximum of 2 direct-enroll UPO courses.

Fall

Introduction to Economics
This is an introductory course devoted not only to essential aspects of the economy but also to the methods and basic principles of economics. The purpose of this course is twofold: firstly, to provide students with an overview of economic problems and, secondly, to analyze in depth some of the most important issues of the economy from the perspective of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory.

Economic History
The aim will be to gain a greater understanding of the role of institutions in economic development, as well as the effects of growth on globalization and well-being. The globalization of the international economy and its long-term effects on human wellbeing will also be analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the role of institutions in this process. While the geographical scope of the course is worldwide, focus is on European and North American economies and how they have interacted with other economic regions within the framework of economic internationalization.

Mathematics for Business I
The aim of the class is to provide students with basic tools needed to interpret and tackle mathematical models associated with the economic problems that can be found in the business world. Students will focus on the basic elements of Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory, Matrix operations and basic elements of functions such as continuity, differentiability and integration, in order to facilitate the comprehension of economic results. Students will also be introduced to the software program Mathematica.

Business Administration
Throughout the course, students will acquire basic business knowledge, including business management, and have a general view of the problems which businesses are faced with: operations, marketing, finance and human resources and acquire knowledge about business development and the different ways of business cooperation.

Financial Mathematics
The objective of this subject is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in the world of banking and finance. This also involves using the most appropriated IT programs for problem-solving. The essential objective is to study the main financial operations like capitalization, bank discount, installment credit, repayment of loans and the mathematical equations which are involved. Using the financial models studied, students will solve equations and suggest additional ways of solving them which could be useful in the financial market.

Macroeconomics
The essential aim of this course is to delve deeper into key concepts introduced in the first-year course Introduction to Economics, such as growth, unemployment, national debt, international trade relations, competition, etc. As the course progresses, students should learn to think like economists, in other words, to use analytical and graphical tools to explain macroeconomic realities. On successful completion of the course, students should have acquired an understanding of macroeconomic environments, allowing them to carry out informed analyses of current economic news.

Business Statistics II
The objectives of this course are to introduce students into the statistical techniques of data analysis, the use of specific statistical software and to make the students aware of the applicability of these statistical techniques to real life business and economic problems.

Business Management Process
The key objectives of the course are to understand what a manager is and the role of management in organizations, to grasp the principal functions of the management process, acquire a comprehensive view of the prevalent lines of thought in management research and literature, observe management functions from the perspective of ethics and social responsibility, understand the importance of the environment as a conditioning factor affecting management, analyze the decision-making process and become familiar with the main support methods/models for this process among others.

Advanced Financial Accounting
The course aims to provide students with the knowledge required for a general understanding of Financial Accounting Statements. The communication process of accounting information is approached from an external point of view, analyzing intensely the main Financial Accounting Statements, and also other kinds of Statements and Corporate Reports. Reliability and relevance issues are also deeply considered. Furthermore, the Advanced Financial Accounting course aims to raise concern among students about the importance of ethical and social responsibility behavior in the profession, as well as the role of accounting in social, environmental and sustainability decision making.

Marketing Management II
The goals of the course are to understand the marketing-related problems faced by profit and non-profit organizations alike; learn how to apply marketing concepts, principles & strategies; develop an ability to put theoretical notions into practice; apply knowledge to real business scenarios and foster an interest in researching and managing information needed for effective marketing decision-making; build effective communication skills both when presenting/expressing ideas in groups / individually, and when understanding the ideas expressed by others.

Human Resources Management
This course will look at operative & strategic human resource management (HRM); planning, positions, personnel selection & staffing; training & HR development; and measuring performance & awarding compensation within organizations.

Operations Management I
In this course students will become familiar with key strategic decisions, including: product selection and design, technology and process design, capacity, localization, distribution and work design. Students will also develop the ability to carry out diagnostics, develop the ability to differentiate between relevant and superficial information when dealing with a strategic problem relating to production management, and acquire efficient communication skills both for expressing and presenting ideas and for understanding ideas expressed/presented by others.

Management Information Systems
The general aim of this undergraduate course is for students to become sufficiently competent using Management Information Systems (MIS) and Information & Communication Technologies (ICT), as applied to Business Management, so as to 1.) Understand the crucial role information systems play in advanced societies and, more specifically, in business, and 2.) Use common ICT tools and information systems techniques proactively in dynamic, rapidly-changing contexts.

Financial Statements Analysis
The objective of the course is to offer the student a catalog of tools that allow them to analyze the economic and financial situation of the company. This way, the student becomes not just an accounting builder, but an accounting user. The course will often combine theoretical and practical views in the same package. The cutting edge of practice in this area in the business world is integrated into the course, without losing sight of other practices already established. The class analyzes the ability to generate business income, and their ability to generate solvency and its ability to generate cash.

Financial Management I
The objective of the course is to provide the student with the conceptual framework necessary to understand the problems facing a financial manager. Readings, class lectures and homework will focus on the basic tools used by financial analysts and decision makers. The course is divided in two parts. The first part focuses on the creation of value in a firm (value of the bonds and stocks issued by a firm, how to invest in projects that add value to the firm, etc.). The second part focused on the relationship between risk and return, and its effects on asset pricing and capital budgeting. The class also analyzes some of the practical problems that a financial manager comes across when making capital budgeting decisions.

Financial Management II
This course is the continuation of Financial Management I. The course offers an overview of financing decisions, dividend policy and the optimal capital structure of a firm. The objective of the course is to provide the student with the appropriated framework to analyze some relatively complex problems that a financial manager needs to address in large corporations. Readings, class lectures and homework will take the student to the type of situations that a financial manager will face in practice.

Strategic Management I
The course aims to expose students to business realities and provide them with the tools they will need in order to carry out sector analysis, study strategic corporate groups, and produce segmentation matrices. In addition, the class strives to help students grasp key variables shaping the current stage of the life cycle in the sector, pinpoint catalysts for success, understand the roots of both success and failure in business ventures, as well as assess roles, antecedents, impact and types of competitive (or business) strategy. Students also learn about cost leadership strategy and differentiation strategy, with a special focus on: nature, favoring factors, etc.

Spring

Microeconomics
The basic objective of this subject is to provide students with a global vision of how economic markets work. The course takes an approach based on a study of consumer and producer behavior. This subject will enable students to advance in the analysis of Consumer and Production theory, competitive equilibrium, and non-competitive markets.

Mathematics for Business II
This course is a continuation of Mathematics for Business I. The class will look at additional elements on Matrix Theory, Input-Output Analysis., Introduction to Optimization Theory (or Mathematical Programming) and its applications to Economics, as well as computer applications used for solving problems.

Business Statistics I
This subject serves as an introduction to basic notions of Descriptive Statistics, Probability Calculus and Statistical Inference. The first will include: the development of statistical analysis of real business and economic data, the knowledge of the most popular index numbers (consumer price index, industrial production index, etc.), and the introduction to the classic analysis of time series. The latter will include: probability calculus, which intends to obtain a sufficient theoretical basis to develop probabilistic models and inferential methods in the future.

Organizational Theory
This course aims to provide a general understanding of organizational theory by Learning about the most relevant organizational theories and understanding the different perspectives adopted to analyze business phenomena, learning about the organizational design function, design parameters, contextual factors and basic organizational models, as well as learning how to diagnose organizational problems and giving possible solutions.

Introduction to Financial Accounting
Financial accounting is concerned with the use of information and helping managers to make better judgments and decisions about the organization. Accounting is the process of identifying, measuring and communicating information. Thus, this course is designed to provide a basic understanding of financial accounting, including introductory accounting theory, concepts, principles and procedures. Also, an overview of the major financial statements is provided.

Marketing Management I
In this course students are introduced to the set of marketing-related problems faced by profit and non-profit organizations alike. Students learn how to apply marketing concepts, principles & strategies, develop an ability to put theoretical notions into practice and apply knowledge to real business scenarios, foster an interest in researching and managing information needed for effective marketing decision-making and communication.

International Economics
This subject is intended for the student to become familiar with the most relevant concepts and methods of analysis in the field of international economics and for him/her to be able to carry out a rigorous analysis of the main phenomena coming about in the current global economy.

Statistical and Econometric Methods for Business
The aim of the course, Statistical and Econometric Methods for Business, is not only to familiarize students with the essential statistical and econometric principles, especially those related to different techniques of Multivariate Analysis and econometric regression model, but also to teach them to use them correctly and efficiently in their daily routine while working in the field of Business and Economics.

Intermediate Financial Accounting
The overall aim of this subject is to develop students accounting knowledge by focusing on accounting rules for measuring and recording, taking into account International Accounting Standards. A shared aim to be promoted throughout the whole accounting curricula is to infuse students with values in order them to be able to understand ethics in accounting profession and the role of accounting in promoting social responsibility, sustainability and accountability.

Applied Economics
This course is intended for students to delve into the developments and be able to understand and explain the current situation of Spanish economy, highlighting its strengths and weaknesses, and its strategic challenges increasingly influenced by the European environment. Students will study Spanish economic growth patterns and the role played by productivity, institutions such as labor market and public sector, financial system and foreign sector, all under the framework of common public policies such as monetary policy in the Euro Area and other partially harmonized policies.

Management Accounting
Management Accounting aims to provide the basics concepts, the techniques needed for costing and analysis and use of management accounting information in the process of planning and control. As a practical aim this course shows which cost data is crucial to measure product, service and customers costs, enabling them to develop planning, control processes and decision making in different organizations.

Strategic Management II
This course focused on how a firm competes within a particular market, mainly Corporate Strategy. The course goal is to understand the roots of success key factors on the emergent and mature industry, and to continue with the main topics of corporate strategy. We begin with vertical integration because it takes us to the heart of many of the issues relevant to determining the optimal scope of the firm and in particular, the role of transaction costs in drawing the boundaries of the firm and the types of relationships between firms.

Operations Management II
This course covers the topic of maintenance and reliability, how to carry out diagnostics, and how to differentiate between relevant and superficial information when dealing with an operational problem relating to production management. Students will also acquire efficient communication skills both for expressing and presenting ideas and for understanding ideas expressed/presented by others. Students will become familiar with key tactical decisions, including: short and medium-term operations planning, production plans hierarchy analysis, MRP and JIT production systems, inventory management and supply chain management.

Corporate Governance and Business Ethics
This course provides an overview of corporate governance on multinational companies, specially focused on the role of shareholders activism on environmental, executive compensation and social issues, as well as an understanding of the structural relationships, determining authority and responsibility for the corporation and their associated complexities.

Enterprising Initiative and Family Business
Enterprising Initiative and Family Business is a subject dealing with the identification and exploitation of entrepreneurial opportunities. The subject will mainly deal with the process of launching new firms although it will touch upon other areas close to entrepreneurship, such as family businesses.

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