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  • Fall 2015
  • Spring 2015
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Dates:
TBA
Deadlines:
04/01/2015
Credit:
13 - 18 semester / 19.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
TBA
Deadlines:
11/01/2014
Credit:
13 - 18 semester / 19.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
TBA
Deadlines:
11/01/2015
Credit:
13 - 18 semester / 19.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
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Study Abroad in Groningen
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Program Overview

Program Overview

Be sure to pack a bike helmet when heading to Groningen. In this “World Cycling City,” nearly 60 percent of journeys are by bike. The city has created a huge network of segregated bike paths and great public transportation – a great example of how urban planners work to meet society’s needs, and a case study you’ll explore with CIEE! In this active city, you’ll take part in engaging discussions, group-project work, applied learning activities in the field, and so much more.

Study abroad in Groningen and you'lll:

  • Interpret complex case studies within the fields of human geography, planning, and environmental sustainability
  • Understand how the Dutch deal with economic, environmental, and settlement challenges within the context of increasing levels of globalization
  • Analyze the complexities of contemporary life in the Netherlands
  • Begin to study or improve your Dutch language skills
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Scholarships & Grants

Scholarships & Grants

We want as many students as possible to benefit from studying abroad. That’s why CIEE awards more than $3 million every year – more than any other international educational organization – to make study abroad affordable.

Applicants to this program are eligible for the following scholarships and grants:

  • Robert B. Bailey Scholarship
  • Robert B. Bailey Scholarship

    The Bailey Scholarship is awarded to students who self-identify as a member of a group that has traditionally been underrepresented in study abroad, especially ethnic minority students. Award amounts are $1,500 for semester or yearlong programs and $1000 for summer programs, applied toward the awardee’s CIEE program fee.

  • CIEE International Study Programs (CIEE-ISP) Scholarships
  • CIEE International Study Programs (CIEE-ISP) Scholarships

    In an effort to make study abroad opportunities available to the widest possible audience, CIEE-ISP Scholarships are awarded to students who demonstrate both academic excellence and financial need. $2,000 for semester or yearlong programs and $1,000 for summer programs, applied toward the awardee's CIEE program fee.

  • GAIN
  • GAIN

    CIEE created the Global Access Initiative (GAIN) to help students overcome the major barriers to studying abroad, namely costs and curriculum requirements. GAIN aids in the diversification of study abroad by providing overseas opportunities for students who are economically challenged. The award is $1500 towards an airline ticket with any remaining funds distributed to the student in the form of a check.

  • Kathleen McDermott Scholarship
  • Kathleen McDermott Scholarship

    The McDermott Scholarship is awarded to students with demonstrated financial need, and who are either a Public Health or Nursing major, and/or are participating in a CIEE Community Public Health study abroad program. Awards range from $1000-$2500, depending on duration of study and financial need, and are applied toward the awardee's CIEE program fee.

To be considered, simply check the “Scholarships and Grants” box on your program application.
Apply now

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The CIEE Difference

The CIEE Difference

Coursework

In addition to a core course on spatial problems and policies, choose from a variety of electives in both the spatial sciences and Dutch studies, including population dynamics, human geography, art, Dutch language, and human rights. You’ll also take part in a multi-week group project, which provides you with the opportunity to do an in-depth and focused study on a specific urban/transportation/environmental/ demographic topic in the Netherlands.

study abroad in The Netherlands

Excursions

During a one-day War Between Water and Land excursion, you’ll go on a tour of Dutch lands transformed by unique water-management policies. On the Randstad and the Green Heart excursion, you’ll make your way to the urban triangle known as “the Randstad,” a polynuclear city encompassing Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague, and others.

Weekend Homestay

Immerse yourself in Dutch culture and family life by spending time with a local family. While not offered as a fulltime housing option, you’ll have the opportunity to participate in a weekend homestay program.

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Dates, Deadlines & Fees

Dates, Deadlines & Fees

We want to make sure you get the most out of your experience when you study abroad with CIEE, which is why we offer the most inclusions in our fees.

The program fee includes:

  • Tuition and housing
  • Pre-departure advising and optional on-site airport meet and greet
  • Full-time program leadership and support
  • Field trips and cultural activities
  • CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits
Please note, program dates are subject to change. Please contact your CIEE Study Abroad Advisor before purchasing airfare. Click the button to view more detailed information about dates and fees as well as estimated additional costs. Please talk with your University Study Abroad Advisor about additional fees that may be charged by your home institution when participating in a program abroad.
Program
Application Due
Start Date
End Date
Costs
Fall 2015
04/01/2015
TBA
TBA
$19,250

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, foreign police registration fee, a museum card, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$15,567
Housing ***
$3,270
Insurance
$113

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Breakfast and one other meal per week are included in the homestay option. No meals are included in the dormitory option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$2,600
International Airfare **
$1,650
Local Transportation
$125
Books & Supplies
$450
Personal expenses
$2,750

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in the dormitory; homestay students should budget $1600 per semester for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring 2015
11/01/2014
TBA
TBA
$19,250

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, foreign police registration fee, a museum card, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$15,567
Housing ***
$3,270
Insurance
$113

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** Breakfast and one other meal per week are included in the homestay option. No meals are included in the dormitory option.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$2,600
International Airfare **
$1,650
Local Transportation
$125
Books & Supplies
$450
Personal expenses
$2,750

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in the dormitory; homestay students should budget $1600 per semester for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Spring 2016
11/01/2015
TBA
TBA

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

Estimated Additional Costs

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

More Information
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Eligibility
2.75 Overall GPA

Eligibility

  • Overall GPA 2.75
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Recommended Credit

Recommended Credit

Recommended credit for the semester program is 13–18 semester/19.5–27 quarter hours.

Contact hours for the CIEE core course Spatial Problems and Spatial Policies are 65 hours and recommended credit is 5 semester/7.5 quarter hours.

Contact hours for the CIEE core course Group Research Project on Planning are 140 study hours (26 in classroom and 114 hours of group meetings) and recommended credit is 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

Contact hours for regular university courses are 45-65 and recommended credit is 2.5–5 semester/3.75–7.5 quarter hours.

Contact hours for the Dutch Language Course Elective are 45 hours and recommended credit is 2.5 semester/3.75 quarter hours.

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Program Requirements

Program Requirements

A full course load is four or five courses. Study abroad students take two required courses: Spatial Problems and Policies and the Group Research Project on Planning. For the rest of their coursework, students choose from courses in the Spatial Planning Department and/or courses from the Dutch Studies program.

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About the City

About The City

Known as “the metropolis of the north” of the Netherlands, Groningen plays an important role in music, the arts, education, and business. And it’s a great place to study urban planning. Archeological traces indicate the area has been active as early as 3950 BC.

Groningen is compact, yet lively, offering everything you would expect from a city with many cafés, shops, historic monuments, theaters, parks, and markets. Students comprise about 25 percent of the population during the academic year, and it is known as one of the Netherlands most student-focused cities. Groningen is located two hours northeast of Amsterdam by train.

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Meet The Staff

Meet The Staff

Staff Image

Renee Spruit

Resident Director

Growing up in a small town in the north of the Netherlands, after high school Renée decided to move to Amsterdam to study. Although she has great memories of her home town, she was sure she wanted to explore more and go beyond the borders of what she knew. While doing a bachelor’s in Communications she was lucky enough to go abroad twice; one semester taking part in a PR program at Seneca College in Toronto, Canada, and one semester doing an internship in the tourism industry in Cape Town, South Africa. She loved to be in an international environment, learn new things, and meet new people. When she got back to the Netherlands she went on to earn an international master’s degree in Sociology (with a special focus on Migration and Ethnic Studies) at the University of Amsterdam.

In 2008, she was appointed resident coordinator at CIEE. From 2008 onwards she has seen the Amsterdam Study Center grow from one program in Social Sciences to several semester and summer programs in both Amsterdam and Groningen. During these years she got to know all aspects of the programs; academics, housing, program development and overseeing the office as a whole.

Renée loves working with international students; seeing the excitement on arrival day and the comfort upon departure; She truly believe it’s a fascinating process how one makes a place his or her new home.

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Fjaere van der Stok

Resident Coordinator

Fjære was raised in the forests of the Northeast Appalachians and on the shores of the Saint Lawrence River by an American mother and a Dutch father. Fjaere moved to the Netherlands when she was seventeen and fell in love with Groningen. She earned a B.A. in French and is currently working on an M.A. in American Studies at the University of Groningen. She loves reliving her own (wide-eyed) acquaintance with Dutch culture through the eyes of the students attending the Urban Planning & Society program at the University of Groningen. She collects rings, drinks coffee, is obsessed with puppies, and misses the mountains and autumn leaves of New England.

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Paul Van Steen

Paul Van Steen is professor of Economic Geography and Urban and Regional Planning in the Department of Spatial Planning.

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Where You'll Study

Where You'll Study

The University of Groningen was established in 1614, making it the second oldest university in the Netherlands. With approximately 27,000 students, it is the third largest university in the Netherlands, with an extremely high academic reputation. CIEE works directly with the Department of Spatial Sciences at the University of Groningen. This department is the second largest in the Netherlands and the only independent department in this field in the country. The University of Groningen Department of Spatial Sciences is made up of the Departments of Cultural Geography, Demography, Economic Geography, and Planning.

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Housing & Meals

Housing & Meals

Study abroad students have two options for housing – an international dormitory or a homestay.

Students that choose a dormitory are housed in single rooms in dormitories throughout the city. All dormitories are within walking distance to a bus stop where students can catch a bus to either the Zernike complex in the north of the city where the Department of Spatial Planning is housed, or the city center where the Dutch Studies Department is located, or a short distance by bike to either. Students can travel between these two campuses in 15 to 20 minutes. Meals are not included in the program fee and are the responsibility of the student. Kitchens are shared and there are common rooms available in the dorms, allowing for better integration with international students. Meals may also be eaten at cafeterias and restaurants in the University area as well as at other local eateries.

A limited number of homestays with Dutch families are also available. This option provides an excellent opportunity for immersion in the local culture. The student has a furnished room and shares a kitchen, bathroom, and living area with the host family. Housing includes breakfast each day, and at least one other meal per week with the family. All other meals are the responsibility of the student.

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Orientations

Orientations

study abroad in The Netherlands

Each semester begins with a mandatory orientation session organized by CIEE in Groningen. The orientation includes an introduction to Dutch society and culture, academics, and excursions in and around the city.

Orientation is coordinated with the European Geography Association Groningen (EGEA). The EGEA Groningen is a group of Dutch students studying Geography or Planning at the Faculty of Spatial Sciences. This group helps to coordinate orientation for exchange students and keeps them informed about events, social activities, and much more. Ongoing support is provided by CIEE staff on a group and individual basis throughout the program.

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Internet

Internet

It's recommended to bring wireless-enabled laptop. Wireless Internet is available in the dorms as well as throughout the city. You will also have access to the various computer labs, available throughout the city at University academic buildings and libraries, for Internet use and printing.

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Culture

Culture

Cultural Activities and Field Trips

study abroad in The Netherlands

The study abroad program provides a unique perspective on Dutch culture and the city itself. Several major excursions are offered as part of the core course, and excursions are linked to various lectures.

The core course excursions include local thematic excursions in the first half of the course to larger day- long excursions the second half of the course. The two full-day excursions include a trip to see Dutch water management at work, where the group visits and discusses old, new, and necessary future flood protection and water management works. A two-day excursion focuses on the densely populated and developed Western part of the Netherlands. This area is also known as “Randstad Holland,” and contains the large cities Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague, and Utrecht, as well as many other smaller cities, towns, and villages connecting the four main cities.

You will also have the possibility to participate in the weekend homestay program. Students can stay for a weekend with a Dutch family. This represents a great opportunity for the student to get to know more about Dutch culture and family life.

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Academics

Academics

The learning pedagogy at the University of Groningen includes lectures, discussions, case studies, interactive sessions, workshops, papers, group projects, excursions, and assignments. The academic and intellectual environment is demanding and requires students to be fully engaged in their courses and group project work, which is an embedded component of the program.

The University of Groningen operates on the semester system but each semester is broken into two blocks, “semester a” and “semester b.” For the second block, in both fall and spring, alternate assessment is provided to allow students to depart earlier than the semester officially ends (in the fall, the semester ends at the beginning of February and in the spring, at the beginning of July). Accommodations are made so that at the end of the fall semester, CIEE students can leave just before the Christmas holiday, and at the end of the spring semester, they can leave at the end of June.

University of Groningen courses range in size from 30 to 50 students. Most courses are taught in a seminar style and are discussion-based.

Nature of Classes

In the Department of Spatial Sciences, the majority of students in the classes are Dutch and international students in their second or third year of their undergraduate program. In the Dutch language and culture courses, students are primarily international. The CIEE core course and research course are made up of CIEE students and other international and Dutch students.

CIEE Community Language Commitment

CIEE resident staff encourages study abroad students to use their language skills in everyday settings and through curricular and extracurricular programming. As their language proficiency grows, students’ full engagement with Dutch society will grow correspondingly. Most people speak English in Groningen but do not speak it as readily as in Amsterdam, therefore students are more challenged to speak Dutch in their daily interactions around the city.

Grading System

In University of Groningen courses students are graded on the basis of class participation, group project work, presentations, papers, and in some cases, a final exam. In some courses, assessment is based on a theoretical exam and a practical aspect of the class, specifically a group or individual project. Mid-terms are often given. Grades are given on a 10-point scale and converted to the U.S. grading scale.

Students must check with their professors to find out exam and other due dates. Under no circumstances will CIEE alter the deadline for a student who has made travel plans on the same day an exam is scheduled or an assignment is due.

Language of Instruction

Dutch
English

Faculty

All courses are taught by the Faculty of Spatial Sciences and the Faculty of Arts at the University of Groningen.

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Course Description

Course Description

All Courses

Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be cancelled due to insufficient enrollment.

CIEE Study Center Syllabi

To view the most recent syllabi for courses taught by CIEE at our Study Centers, visit our syllabi site.

Required CIEE Core Course

GEOG 3001 GUPS/URBS 3001 GUPS

Spatial Problems and Spatial Policies: The Dutch Experience
The core course uses the Dutch experience of defining spatial problems and devising, implementing, and monitoring spatial policies to investigate more widely applicable aspects of national, urban, and regional planning. It is taught by specialized staff from the Department of Spatial Sciences and coordinated through weekly tutorials and seminars. Lecture topics include Population Dynamics, Cultural Geography of the Netherlands, Physical Geography of the Netherlands, Dutch Water Management Policies, Transportation and Mobility, International Position of the Netherlands, Spatial Planning, Environmental Planning, Energ,y and Space, Death and Space, Rural Areas and Agriculture in the Netherlands, and Regional Economic Policies. The core course meets during the first block of the semester or “semester a” which lasts 10 weeks and delivers the historical, cultural, and environmental context and foundations for the research project that follows. Contact hours: 65. Recommended credit: 5 semester / 7.5 quarter hours. Fall and spring.

GEOG 3002 GUPS/URBS 3002 GUPS

Group Research Project on Planning
The Group Research Project on Planning takes place during the second block of the semester or “semester b” and lasts six weeks in the Fall, and eight weeks in the spring. The Group Research Project includes the theoretical and practical underpinnings of social science research, research design, and methods via lectures and targeted group tutorials before and during fieldwork. The group project provides students with the opportunity to do an in-depth and focused study on a specific urban/transportation/environmental/demographic topic in the Netherlands. Research groups integrate U.S. and international students from various disciplines allowing for an impressive synergy of approaches and ideas. Contact hours: 140 study hours (26 in classroom and 114 in group meetings). Recommended credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours. Fall and spring.

Department of Spatial Sciences Electives

Healthy Aging
This course introduces students to population aging, particularly as it relates to health and wellbeing. Students gain an understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of aging and healthy aging, explore the many diverse societal and individual implications of aging, multidisciplinary approaches to aging, and reflect on outcomes of such research. Topics include theoretical perspectives, the effect of aging on the individual, the influence of the individual within society, intergenerational issues, constructs of aging, giving meaning, diversity in aging, the life course, place attachment, desired living arrangements, urban design, entrepreneurship among disabled, and the study of final places. Fall. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

Infrastructure, Economy, and Space
Students will learn about the relationship between infrastructure development and economic development. Part of this course will be discussing the effects of large infrastructural projects during the 90’s and the public discussion related to these projects. Spring. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

Migration
This course represents a thorough scientific introduction to the different aspects of migration. Students learn to look at migration from an academic point of view, both from the macro societal level as well from the micro perspective of the individual. The goal of the course is to provide insight into the most important theoretical and empirical aspects of migration. After successful completion of the course students are able to understand and analyze the main trends and developments in migration, which includes international migration as well as internal migration (migration within countries). Fall. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

Philosophies of Social Science, Human Geography, and Planning
This course introduces and engages learners who will not have encountered university philosophy before with key ideas and debates in the philosophies of social science. The aim is to explain how these ideas work out in examples drawn from the practice of human geography and planning in the post-war period. Spring. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

Population Dynamics in the Netherlands and Europe
This course introduces students to recent demographic developments and challenges in the Netherlands and Europe, including population decline and population aging;, the link with the underlying processes of fertility, mortality, and migration, as well as the societal consequences. Also, attention is paid to the main demographic measures and data sources. Fall. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

Population, Health, and Space
This course introduces students to the dual link between health at the population level and place or geography. The course is very interdisciplinary. The module will not only discuss concepts from (medical) demography and (health) geography, but also from epidemiology, medical sociology, and medical anthropology. The module expounds the clear relationship between demography, and geography/planning in the field of health through discussion of, for example, the relationship between mobility/migration and health. Fall. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

Spatial Planning: The Urban Challenge
This course exposes students to theories, concepts, and multimedia techniques to understand the social, economic, political, and environmental characteristics of cities, and consequently how forms of intervention by planners relate to the history, evolution, and processes within urban areas. Fall. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

Dutch Studies Electives

Communication In and About the Netherlands
This course deals with aspects of Dutch culture and communication within the Netherlands and across its borders. The Netherlands has always been a pluralistic society with different cultural and religious groups. In addition, as a seafaring nation, the Netherlands has always had contacts with foreigners. The book central to this course describes Dutch culture and mentality and its roots. Additional literature covers topics such as ethnic minorities in Dutch society and Dutch as a second language, and the image of the Netherlands abroad. Fall and Spring. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

Dutch Language Course Electives
Dutch is offered at all levels each semester. Dutch language takes place throughout the semester, with two sessions of two hours each per week, ending before Christmas in the fall. Fall and Spring. Contact hours: 45. Recommended credit: 2.5 semester / 3.75 quarter hours.

Dutch Modern History in International Perspective
This course deals with the social and economic history of the Netherlands from its “Golden Age” to the 21st century, from an international and national perspective. The emphasis is on developments in the social structure, economics, and economic and social policy. Topics include the global mercantile network, “the first modern economy,” land reclamation, social and political elites, retarded industrialization, the welfare state and its social and economic consequences, social policies in the 19th and 20th century, and the Dutch positions in European integration. Some attention is also given to the Dutch colonial empire in the Caribbean and Asia. Fall. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

Dutch Studies Lecture Series
The lecture series on Dutch Culture and Society is a course aiming not only at foreign students, but also at visiting faculty members or employees of international business companies. In fact, every non-Dutch visitor to Groningen interested in any aspect of Dutch society will find something of his or her interest in this series. Every Wednesday evening, a lecture is given on a broad range of topics—Rembrandt, water management, language in the low lands, political culture, land reclamation, Dutch economy, and the former Dutch colonies are examples. Fall and Spring.Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

European Union, Myth or Reality?
During this course, students explore the policies, institutes, and history of the European Union in relation to global news issues. Special attention is placed upon the relationship between the European Union and the Netherlands. Fall. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

International Human Rights: Dutch Perspective
In this course, the following themes are covered: the philosophy of human rights, the United Nations and human rights protection, regional mechanisms, EVRM, international minority protection, the Yugoslavia tribunal, Rwanda tribunal and the International Court of Justice, non-governmental organizations and their contribution and protection of human rights, and the Dutch role in protecting human rights. Spring. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

Migration and Minorities in History
This course introduces students to some of the most important migratory movements in Western Europe, with a main focus on the Netherlands, and across the Atlantic to the North American colonies. Concepts of integration and assimilation are discussed and settlement patterns and group dynamics of migrants are analyzed. Spring. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

The Language Situation in the Low Countries
This course provides an overview of the development of the Dutch language and its current position. Furthermore, students look at the similarities and differences between Dutch and English, German,and Friesian, and where the phonetics, morphology, and syntax are examined. Students explore the relationship between Dutch in the Netherlands versus in Flanders, the position of the Friesian language, and the relationship between Dutch and Afrikaans. Fall. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

Literature and the Arts from 1870–1960s
The objective of this course is to provide insight into the development of Dutch literature and Dutch art from the period 1870–1970, where special attention is given to their relationship. Impressionism, symbolism, and avant-garde are discussed. Spring. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

Literature and Intellectual Life in Dutch Golden Age
In this course, students become familiar with the most famous Dutch literary figures and their work. Various topics are covered within the broader cultural context of the 17th century, including sculpture, music, and philosophy. All texts are presented in English as well as Dutch. Fall. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

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