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By Term

  • Fall 2014
  • Fall 2015
  • Spring 2015
  • Spring 2016
  • Academic year 2014-2015
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Dates:
08/19/2014 - 12/13/2014
Deadlines:
Extended to: 05/15/2014
Credit:
15 - 18 semester / 22.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
TBA
Deadlines:
04/01/2015
Credit:
15 - 18 semester / 22.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
01/02/2015 - 04/25/2015
Deadlines:
10/15/2014
Credit:
15 - 18 semester / 22.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
TBA
Deadlines:
10/15/2015
Credit:
15 - 18 semester / 22.5 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
08/19/2014 - 04/25/2015
Deadlines:
Extended to: 05/15/2014
Credit:
see credit information below
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
TBA
Deadlines:
04/01/2015
Credit:
see credit information below
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
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Study Abroad in Santiago
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Program Overview

Program Overview

Improve your Spanish while gaining insight into the realities of life in the developing world of the Dominican Republic. In Santiago, you’ll immerse yourself in local culture, both on and off campus, through a combination of intensive coursework, homestays, volunteer opportunities, and a variety of cultural activities and excursions. In class you’ll study the language, politics, regional literature, and art. During rural work retreats, you’ll become part of life in the Dominican Republic – and the Dominican Republic will become part of you.

Study abroad in Santiago and you'll:

  • Interact with Dominican society through homestays, university courses, rural and urban volunteering activities, language partners, and activities with Dominican and Haitian students
  • Consider an optional community service or Teaching English as a Second Language course (earn a TESL certificate), both of which include a hands-on practicum
  • Contrast the daily realities of the Dominicans and Haitians who share the campus and city
  • Learn outside the classroom on class trips including visits to free trade zones, sites of ecological and historical-cultural importance, and a weekend excursions to the Samaná Peninsula and mountains of Constanza
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Scholarships & Grants

Scholarships & Grants

We want as many students as possible to benefit from studying abroad. That’s why CIEE awards more than $3 million every year – more than any other international educational organization – to make study abroad affordable.

Applicants to this program are eligible for the following scholarships and grants:

  • Bailey Minority Serving Institution Grants
  • Bailey Minority Serving Institution Grants

    For minority students from minority-serving institutions who demonstrate financial need based on estimated family contribution (EFC)

  • Bowman Travel Grants
  • Bowman Travel Grants

    For students who want to pursue study abroad in Africa, Asia Pacific, the Caribbean, or Latin America, and who demonstrate financial based on estimated family contribution (EFC)

  • Ping Scholarships for Academic Excellence
  • Ping Scholarships for Academic Excellence

    For students with a GPA or 3.8 or higher who excel in academic pursuits devoted to socially important areas of study

  • Global Access Initiative (GAIN) Grants
  • Global Access Initiative (GAIN) Grants

    For students who demonstrate financial need, CIEE provides direct support for travel.

    Awards: Up to $1,500 per student

  • Michael Stohl Research Scholarship
  • Michael Stohl Research Scholarship

    The Michael Stohl Research Scholarship is awarded to students studying for a semester or year who are self-identified as a 1st generation college student, demonstrate financial need, are a non-traditionally aged student, have a non-traditional background, and/or are planning to conduct research as part of the study abroad program. Preference is given to students from public higher education institutions. Awards range from $1000-$5000, depending on duration of study and financial need, and are applied toward the awardee's CIEE program fee.

  • Language Intensive-Focus Track (LIFT) Merit Scholarships
  • Language Intensive-Focus Track (LIFT) Merit Scholarships

    For students who want to pursue an intensive language program for one academic year in Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, China, Cuba, Dominican Republic, France, Italy, Jordan, Mexico, Peru, Russia, Senegal, Spain, or Taiwan

  • Stohl International Undergraduate Research Scholarships
  • Stohl International Undergraduate Research Scholarships

    For first-generation college students who want to combine research and study abroad. Preference is given to students with diverse ethnic backgrounds.

To be considered, simply check the “Scholarships and Grants” box on your program application.
Apply now

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The CIEE Difference

The CIEE Difference

Coursework

Enroll in one of three distinct academic tracks based on your level of language proficiency. Each track offers a variety of courses on the society, culture, economics, and politics of Hispaniola and the greater Hispanic Caribbean. Study regional literature, history, and the widely variant socio-cultural issues facing the region.

Excursions

study abroad in the Dominican Republic

Spend three days in the tropical paradise of the Samaná Peninsula, where you’ll meet Martha Wilmore, a historian specializing in slavery. Get a break from the heat of Santiago during a trip to Constanza, home to the highest peaks in all of the Caribbean. You’ll also spend two weekends working and enjoying daily life in rural Dominican Republic. Enjoy daylong and extended excursions throughout the country including visits to agricultural and industrial projects, and a Dominican tobacco company.

Volunteering

From caring for infants and children with mental and physical challenges to helping young boys at a baseball academy, volunteer work gets you up close and personal with the real Dominican Republic. You might assist an elementary school teacher, or take care of young mothers in a resource-poor neighborhood. Plus, two rural work retreats each semester will introduce you to the country’s non-urban reality, while providing opportunities to take part in a service project and reflect on the issues affecting service work and community building.

Student to student

As part of the CIEE Seminar on Living and Learning in Santiago, you’ll share your culture, and learn about a new one through a series of directed homework assignments with a Dominican or Haitian cultural partner. During the semester, you might also talk with Dominican and Haitian university students during a university English class – an educational experience for both you and the local students.

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Dates, Deadlines & Fees

Dates, Deadlines & Fees

We want to make sure you get the most out of your experience when you study abroad with CIEE, which is why we offer the most inclusions in our fees.

The program fee includes:

  • Tuition and housing
  • Pre-departure advising and optional on-site airport meet and greet
  • Full-time program leadership and support
  • Field trips and cultural activities
  • CIEE iNext travel card, which provides insurance and other travel benefits
Please note, program dates are subject to change. Please contact your CIEE Study Abroad Advisor before purchasing airfare. Click the button to view more detailed information about dates and fees as well as estimated additional costs. Please talk with your University Study Abroad Advisor about additional fees that may be charged by your home institution when participating in a program abroad.
Program
Application Due
Start Date
End Date
Costs
Fall 2014 (17 wks)
Extended to: 05/15/2014
08/19/2014
12/13/2014

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

Estimated Additional Costs

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

More Information
Fall 2015
04/01/2015
TBA
TBA
$12,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, language partners, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$10,512
Housing ***
$1,925
Insurance
$113

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** includes all meals

Estimated Additional Costs

International Airfare *
$500
Local Transportation
$200
Books & Supplies
$175
Visa Fees **
$200
Potential travel to consulate for visa
$500
Personal expenses
$1,200

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

** average cost

More Information
Spring 2015 (16 wks)
10/15/2014
01/02/2015
04/25/2015
$12,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, language partners, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$10,512
Housing ***
$1,925
Insurance
$113

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** includes all meals

Estimated Additional Costs

International Airfare *
$500
Local Transportation
$200
Books & Supplies
$175
Visa Fees **
$200
Potential travel to consulate for visa
$500
Personal expenses
$1,200

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

** average cost

More Information
Spring 2016
10/15/2015
TBA
TBA

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

Estimated Additional Costs

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

More Information
Academic year 2014-2015 (36 wks)
Extended to: 05/15/2014
08/19/2014
04/25/2015

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

Estimated Additional Costs

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

More Information
Academic year 2015-2016
04/01/2015
TBA
TBA
$24,400

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, language partners, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$20,137
Housing ***
$3,850
Insurance
$113

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** includes all meals

Estimated Additional Costs

International Airfare *
$500
Local Transportation
$400
Books & Supplies
$350
Visa Fees **
$200
Potential travel to consulate for visa
$500
Personal expenses
$2,400
Expenses during break ***
$450

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

** average cost

*** academic year students are responsible for housing and meals during the semester break

More Information
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Eligibility
2.75 Overall GPA

Eligibility

  • Overall GPA 2.75
  • 3.0 GPA in Spanish language
  • 4 semesters of college-level Spanish or equivalent
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Recommended Credit

Recommended Credit

Credit Total recommended credit for the semester is 15–18 semester/22.5–27 quarter hours. Total recommended credit for the academic year is 30–34 semester/45–51 quarter hours.

Course contact hours are 45 hours and recommended credit is 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours, unless otherwise indicated.

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Program Requirements

Program Requirements

All participants must enroll in 15-18 credits worth of courses. They may take a maximum of 16 credits at Pontificia Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra (PUCMM), including a Spanish language course; the program´s core course, Contemporary Dominican Republic: Political and Socioeconomic Processes; and PUCMM´s elective courses. They may also take the optional 2-credit CIEE Seminar on Living and Learning in Santiago. According to the results of an on-site language proficiency examination at the beginning of the program, students are placed into one of three advanced language levels, which determines the required language course and electives they may take.

Level I: Students who place into Advanced Level I Spanish are required to take the 6-credit language course and the 3-credit CIEE core course. Students then can choose up to 6 or 7 credits from PUCMM´s Spanish for Foreigners elective courses, including dance/sports/arts courses (see below), and the optional CIEE Seminar.

Level II: Students who place into Advanced Level II Spanish are required to take the 4-credit language course and the 3-credit CIEE core course. Students then can choose up to 8 or 9 credits from PUCMM´s Spanish for Foreigners elective courses, including dance/sports/arts courses (see below), and the optional CIEE Seminar.

Level III: Students who place into Advanced Spanish III are required to take the 4-credit language course and the 3-credit CIEE core course. Students also select up to 8 or 9 credits of PUCMM electives, one of which must be a direct enrollment course (note that some direct enrollment classes have pre- requisites) and the optional CIEE Seminar.

Dance/Arts/Sports classes: Regardless of language level, all CIEE study abroad students may choose to take dance, sports, and arts courses as electives that they take alongside PUCMM students. Contact hours for these courses are 20 hours and recommended credit is 1 semester / 1.5 quarter hours per course. Students are expected to do required readings as part of these courses, and most require a written exam.

Note that academic year students must continue their language study during their second semester on site.

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About the City

About The City

Columbus first ran into this island in 1492. In the northeast, you’ll find luminous, azure waters, white sand beaches, and palm trees swaying. An hour inland, the small city of Santiago (also known as Santiago de los Caballeros) bustles with modern life, surrounded by dense tropical mountains. Known as La Ciudad Corazón (City of the Heart), Santiago is the commercial and cultural center of the Cibao region and home to over 100 industrial free-trade-zone factories, the León Jiménez Cultural Center and cigar factory, and the lively commercial street of Calle del Sol. Although it is a growing city with a population exceeding 800,000, Santiago still feels in many ways like a small town.

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Meet The Staff

Meet The Staff

Staff Image

Lynne Guitar

Lynne Guitar, Ph.D., came to the Dominican Republic as a Fulbright Fellow in 1997, and has lived here ever since. She earned simultaneous bachelors degrees in history and anthropology from Michigan State University in 1992, and in 1994 and 1998, respectively, a master’s degree and doctorate in colonial Latin American history and anthropology at Vanderbilt University. She has worked as a director for CIEE in Santiago since 2004. Her research interests focus on eco-education, history, and popular Dominican culture from its origins among the Taíno Indians through contemporary cultural manifestations. Lynne writes historical novels and professional articles, gives presentations about Dominican and Taíno history and culture, and assists in a wide variety of documentaries and movies filmed in or about the Dominican Republic. She also owns a huge cave a few hours from Santiago, and helps run a community center there for local residents.

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The Dominican Republic is ‘the land Columbus loved best’ – a complex point of historical and social controversy. This is where Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans came together for the very first time to set into motion the complex social, economic, and political patterns that formed the basis for daily life today. These patterns are complicated by the fact that the island was colonized by both the French and the Spanish, creating differences that continue to spark political and socio-ethnic clashes today.

Dominican music, song and dance, foods, literature, religious practices, art, and even sports reflect this dynamic combination of cultures. We encourage you to come to Santiago to immerse yourself among Dominicans with their ready smiles, rapid-fire Spanish, and colorful customs. We hope your experience will be the one among all of your student experiences that most changes your life, the one that most broadens your outlook and, conversely, gives you the greatest insight into yourself and your own values and culture.

— Lynne Guitar, Resident Director

Staff Image

Ryan Bowen

Resident Coordinator

Ryan Bowen earned a bachelor’s degree in Spanish literary and cultural studies and religious studies from Occidental College in Los Angeles, Calif. During college, he studied abroad in the Dominican Republic as a participant on the CIEE’s Liberal Arts program in Santiago. An avid traveler, Ryan spent four years working with underserved youth from communities in New York and Washington state, traveled through east Africa, and rode across the U.S. on his bicycle. Ryan’s passion for the DR is complemented by a love for photography. He shares deep knowledge of the fascinating people and places of Hispaniola with students on CIEE Santiago study programs.

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Staff Image

Melba Gonzalez

Melba González earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Universidad Tecnológica de Santiago (UTESA), and has been working with CIEE for nearly 20 years. Any questions you might have about the program, campus, city, where to get something, how to get somewhere, really anything at all – ask the always smiling Melba.

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Where You'll Study

Where You'll Study

The Pontificia Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra (PUCMM) is a private, nonprofit institution of higher education. Founded in 1962, PUCMM has been ranked by the Inter-American Development Bank as the best academic institution of higher learning in the Dominican Republic. It has five academic divisions: social sciences and administration, science and humanities, engineering, health sciences, and tourism/restaurant management. With an enrollment of approximately 8,000 students, PUCMM offers the academic resources, support services, and physical facilities of a superior-level Latin American educational institution.

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Housing & Meals

Housing & Meals

study abroad in the Dominican Republic

Housing and all meals are included in the study abroad program fee. Students live in Dominican private homes and meals are eaten at the place of residence. Housing assignments are made by the Office of International Students at PUCMM, based on questionnaires that students submit to CIEE. The families are middle to upper-middle class, with a working class option, and all live within walking distance of PUCMM. Students and their families are asked to speak Spanish exclusively. Living in private homes is considered the best housing arrangement in Santiago because of its practicality (there is no student housing on campus) and positive contribution to the program’s objectives. CIEE works closely with host families to provide students the opportunity for integration into the Dominican community.

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Orientations

Orientations

You'll begin your study abroad experience in Santiago even before leaving home by participating in a CIEE online pre-departure orientation. The resident director meets with students online and shares information about the program and site, highlighting issues that alumni have said are important, and giving you time to ask questions. The online orientation allows you to connect with others in the group, reflect on what you want to get out of the program, and learn what others in the group would like to accomplish. CIEE’s aim for the pre-departure orientation is simple: to help you understand more about the program and identify your goals.

A mandatory orientation is conducted in Santiago and lasts approximately one week, with various activities held on the PUCMM campus as well as in and around Santiago and Santo Domingo. Orientation features discussions about the culture, history, and practices that are particular to the Dominican Republic, as well as health and safety precautions and other practical information about the program, campus, city, and country. You'll meet and interact with Dominican and Haitian students, explore the city independently, and visit your fellow students’ host families, better familiarizing you with your surroundings. In addition, you'll take a Spanish language placement test and register for classes during this time. Ongoing support is provided by CIEE staff on an individual and group basis throughout the study abroad program.

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Internet

Internet

You are strongly encouraged to bring a wireless-enabled laptop. Though home access to the Internet is more rare than in the U.S., many public areas, including restaurants and commercial centers, have free wireless access, and wireless Internet is available throughout the PUCMM campus. There is a computer lab at PUCMM as well as computers with Internet access in the CIEE Study Center for your use.

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Culture

Culture

study abroad in the Dominican Republic

The study abroad program offers an extensive agenda of educational excursions throughout the country and provides weekly calendars of local socio-cultural activities in Santiago and the surrounding area. Offerings include rural and urban volunteer opportunities, numerous day trips, and class trips designed to supplement classroom content. You are encouraged to participate in the student opportunities offered by PUCMM, such as helping with planning educational fairs and participating in health promotions. These are designed to allow you to intimately experience Dominican culture and geography outside of the classroom setting.

Weekend excursions generally include the Valley of Constanza, high in the central mountains, and the Samaná Peninsula, where we visit sites in Los Haitises National Park that that are accessible only by boat. Day trips include visits to sites such as the Capital and its Zona Colonial; the Hermanas Mirabal Museum in Salcedo; La Vega during Carnaval season; and to the market town of Dajabón, the principal commercial and economic development zone on the Haitian-Dominican border. There is also a selection of optional co- pay activities that cater to individual interests and include cultural, historical, and ecological options.

Many field trips are also integrated into academic classes. These may include visits to agricultural and industrial projects, free trade zones, a Dominican tobacco company, local museums, clinics, schools, and nonprofit organizations.

Two times each semester students will do service work in a rural community. CIEE has a long-standing relationship with many of the service sites. While safe, accommodations for these optional retreats are rustic, often testing the ability of students to adapt to the Dominican rural reality. Students work right along side local community members.

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Academics

Academics

The CIEE Liberal Arts study abroad program in Santiago was established in 1987 with a dual focus: to enable students to achieve advanced Spanish language skills, while studying and actively participating in the society of a developing Caribbean country. The program is designed for students who have taken two years of college-level Spanish and would like to significantly improve their skills in conversation and grammar. Liberal Arts courses offer a solid foundation and unique insight into the evolution of society, culture, economics, and politics of Hispaniola (an island shared by the Dominican Republic and the Republic of Haiti) and the greater Hispanic Caribbean, providing courses on regional literature, history, and the comparison of the widely variant socio-cultural issues that are pertinent for contemporary society in this region.

At the start of the semester, all CIEE study abroad students are tested to determine their oral and written Spanish level. Students are then placed in one of three distinct academic tracks (Advanced Level I, II, or III) according to their language proficiency, each offering a different configuration of required and elective courses.

Those with strong motivation, independence, and a high level of Spanish may continue for a second semester at the CIEE Study Center in Santo Domingo, or on the Service-Learning program in Santiago. Academic year students have a three-week break between the first and second semesters.

Academic Culture

Most students at Pontificia Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra (PUCMM) specialize in a profession such as law, medicine, engineering, architecture, education, or business. The only social science majors are psychology and social communication. Although PUCMM is considered to be the country’s premier private university, like other Latin American universities, it has limited resources compared to most U.S. colleges and universities.

Study abroad students who place into the two most advanced levels of the program have the opportunity to take direct enrollment classes with PUCMM students. Students from the United States commonly find striking differences between teaching goals and methods at PUCMM compared to what they are accustomed to at home. This can be challenging, but also educational. Teaching methods are less formal, employing a mix of tutorials, readings, discussions, reports, and tests, but with more reliance on memorization than analysis. Many of the presentations for a particular class are researched and presented by individuals or student groups, not by the professors, stimulating students to take more initiative in their own learning process.

Nature of Classes

The advanced Spanish language and CIEE core course are for CIEE students only. Electives through PUCMM’s division of Spanish for Foreigners include other international students and may include up to five Dominican and/or Haitian students. In direct enrollment courses, CIEE students enroll in university courses alongside Dominicans and Haitians.

CIEE Community Language Commitment

Students take part in the CIEE Community Language Commitment by speaking Spanish at all times (except in emergencies). This fosters a learning community that contributes to both Spanish language proficiency and a better understanding of Dominican society.

Grading System

In CIEE and PUCMM courses, students are normally graded on any combination of the following: quizzes, exams, papers, student presentations, and class participation, much as in the U.S. Letter grades of A-F are given without pluses or minuses. Attendance is mandatory and incompletes are not accepted.

Language of Instruction

Spanish (except TESL and the Seminar on Living and Learning in Santiago)

Faculty

Professors are from the Pontificia Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra or contracted by the Department of Applied Linguistics and the Area of Spanish for Foreigners.

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Course Description

Course Description

All Courses

Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be cancelled due to insufficient enrollment.

CIEE Study Center Syllabi

To view the most recent syllabi for courses taught by CIEE at our Study Centers, visit our syllabi site.

A preliminary list of courses is sent to students upon acceptance into the program. The final list of available courses is given to students upon arrival, as not all courses are offered every semester.

Required CIEE Language Courses

SPAN 3001 DRAS

Advanced Spanish I
This course is required for students whose mastery of grammatical structures and oral command of Spanish needs additional work to bring them up to the level to succeed in university courses conducted completely in Spanish. Emphasis is placed on pronunciation through reading and discussion of a broad range of cultural materials, oral presentations, and taped exercises. Contact hours: 90. Recommended credit: 6 semester / 9 quarter hours.

SPAN 3002 DRAS

Advanced Spanish II
This course is designed to improve active command of the Spanish language with attention given to four skill areas: written, oral, aural, and vocabulary. A variety of techniques are used to instruct students, including readings, discussions, oral reports, short compositions, and taped exercises. Conversational skills and pronunciation are stressed, including vocabulary building. Contact hours: 60. Recommended credit: 4 semester / 6 quarter hours.

SPAN 4001 DRAS

Advanced Spanish III
This course integrates an introduction to Hispanic socio-linguistics (including the phonetic traits, morphosyntax, and semantics of Dominican Spanish) with intensive practice in the most problematical and complex areas of Spanish grammar, stressing analysis, writing, and discussion based upon extensive reading about Hispanic-American cultural themes. Students must have previous command of complex grammatical structures and advanced levels of both written and spoken Spanish. Contact hours: 60. Recommended credit: 4 semester / 6 quarter hours.

Required CIEE Core Course

LAST 3003 DRAS

Contemporary Dominican Republic: Political and Socioeconomic Processes
Social, economic, and political aspects of contemporary Dominican society are examined. Topics include: the Trujillo dictatorship, occupational and demographic structure, education, health, government organization and political parties, income distribution, marginalization of the poor, the role of women in the Dominican Republic, the environment and ecological problems, Dominican-Haitian relations, the Dominican Republic’s relationship with the Caribbean and the U.S., and internal and transnational migration. This course is divided into two sections based on Spanish language level.

CIEE Elective Course

CLST 3001 DRAS

Seminar on Living and Learning in Santiago
The CIEE Seminar on Living and Learning in Santiago is designed to improve students’ intercultural communication and competence while studying abroad by considering how Dominicans are different from, and similar to, themselves and others. The course offers opportunities, both in and outside the classroom, to develop insights and the skills necessary to interact effectively and appropriately, and to gain a better understanding and appreciation of the cultural richness of the Dominican Republic. Contact hours: 25. Recommended credit: 2 semester hours / 3 quarter hours.

INDR 3003 DRAS

Directed Independent Research
CIEE supports qualified students who wish to pursue an academically rigorous independent research project while in Santiago. Interested students must submit a research proposal including a clearly defined research topic, explanation of research plans, description of preparation in the planned area of study, list of resources, tentative outline of a final paper, and suggested schedule of progress. Students complete a total of 135 hours of research and meet regularly with an advisor to complete an academically rigorous, ethically sound, and culturally appropriate research project and final paper. Approval for participation in Directed Independent Research must be obtained from the resident director and the student’s home institution prior to arrival on the program.

PUCMM Elective Courses: Spanish for Foreigners

These classes are offered for foreigners by PUCMM staff, although up to five Dominican and/or Haitian students per class may also enroll, space permitting. Courses are not always offered each semester and a minimum enrollment of six students is needed to run each class.

Levels I, II, and III

Caribbean Short Stories
This course offers a panorama of Spanish Caribbean literature in Spanish from the colonial era through the present, with an emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Course content is developed through lectures, readings, discussion, and analysis of representative works of each period from Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic.

Community Service Practicum
Designed for students interested in development or social work, the course seeks to identify the causes of problems in the areas of education, health, and neighborhood-level social service, as well as give students an understanding of the Dominican reality. Complementing the academic coursework is a minimum of four hours of weekly volunteer work in a social service activity in Santiago. There is also a requirement for a final paper that combines knowledge learned in the classroom with experience gained in the volunteer practicum. At the end of the semester, students give a public presentation of their community service experience. Contact hours: 28 theory, 56 practicum. Recommended credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

Culture and Society of the Hispanic Caribbean
This class examines the parallel and contrasting cultural characteristics of the Hispanic Caribbean through analysis of the different ways in which Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic developed. Students study the history and society of each island, focusing on their intellectual movements, political thought, and artistic and literary movements. Contact hours: TBD. Recommended credit: TBD semester/TBD quarter hours.

English as a Second Language (ESL)
Teacher Training Methodology Course and Directed Teaching

This course trains students in teaching English as a second language, giving an overview of recent theories of second-language acquisition and teaching methodologies, practical application, and theoretical principles through class presentations and student teaching. Credit is granted for the course in conjunction with teaching (but not for teaching alone). There is also a requirement for a final paper that combines knowledge learned in the classroom with experience gained in the directed teaching segment. (Please note that although each student who successfully completes this course receives a TESL certificate, the certificate does not fulfill U.S. or foreign requirements for teaching English as a second language. This course is taught in English and is offered on a for-credit basis only with home institution approval.) Contacthours: 28 theory, 56 practicum. Recommended credit: 4 semester / 6 quarter hours.

Introduction to Dominican Folklore
This class presents a complete and systematic panorama of the different aspects and branches of folklore, with rich Dominican examples so that students can understand easily and appreciate the cultural context into which they are immersed. Examples include verbal folklore (spoken, proverbs, poetry, legends, stories, songs); partially spoken (superstitions, magic, children’s games); nonverbal (gestures, costumes, food); and field work methodology.

Latin American Cinema and Society
Cinema is recognized as one of the most effective mediums to understand the social, political, and cultural reality of both the past and the present, as well as the general diffusion of human ideas across time and place. This course combines the theoretical bases of cinematography with in-depth analyses of the best Latin American and Hispanic-Caribbean films to help students gain a more profound understanding of Latin American society.

Levels II and III

Afro-Caribbean Cultures
This course looks at the diversity, uniqueness, and unity of the African experience across the Caribbean. The goal of the course is to help students understand the historical roots and social processes of Afro- Caribbean heritage in society, politics, the arts, and various other cultural aspects, including Afro-Caribbean religious beliefs and practices.

Contemporary Dominican Literature
Dominican literature of the 20th and 21st centuries is surveyed with an emphasis on developments since the advent of Modernism. Topics include the influence of race, geography, and politics; and the effects of 20th and 21st century “Dominican reality” on literary trends. Students gain an understanding of and appreciation for the imagination, esthetic literary values, and spiritual expressions of this country’s contemporary authors of short stories, poetry, and novels.

Contemporary Latin American Literature
This course provides a survey of modern Latin American literature from 20th century Modernism through the Latin American boom in Post-Modernism. Students read and analyze some of Latin America’s most renowned authors of poetry, short stories, essays, and novels.

Dominican-Haitian Relations
This course examines the realities of the contemporary Republic of Haiti and the Dominican Republic, with a review of the historical and structural underpinnings that have influenced relations between the countries. The course addresses historical events that define Dominican-Haitian relations, beginning with the colonial period through the Trujillo Era and into the present.

Gender and Society of the Hispanic Caribbean
The situation of women in the Hispanic Caribbean is analyzed from a human development perspective using comparative analyses in the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. The course examines the variables of health, education, work, politics, and art, starting from the level of development of the individual Hispanic Caribbean countries. Student participation requires extensive field work in Santiago and other sites around the Dominican Republic.

History of the Caribbean
Caribbean history from the colonial period to the present is surveyed in this course, with an emphasis on the Spanish Caribbean. Topics include conquest and colonization, the rise of sugar, the Haitian revolution and the abolition of slavery, independence movements, economic imperialism in the 20th century, the Cuban revolution, and 21st-century globalization.

Latin American Culture and Society
In an exploratory and introductory manner, students examine the formation and evolution of the various Latin American cultures and societies in the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. The course focuses on the principal historic events and the socio-cultural forces and processes that have impacted their development, provided development potential, or blocked the development of Latin American societies.

Literature of Latin American and Caribbean Women
This course introduces students to literature written by Latin American and Caribbean women from the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasis is on gender and women’s actual experiences throughout history in terms of their political, social, and cultural circumstances, as well as the discrimination that women have faced in the literary arena.

Panorama of Hispanic American Literature
This course seeks to help students learn that literature is an evolutionary and dynamic art form that can help them understand the reality of life in a particular Hispanic country at a particular time in history. Students read about and analyze literary movements through the works of the most representative Hispanic American authors from the Conquest Era through present day.

Spanish Caribbean Literature
Literature of the Spanish-speaking Caribbean is examined from its origins to the present, with emphasis on authors and works of the 19th and 20th centuries. Literary movements such as indigenism and negritude are analyzed through the works of representative Dominican, Cuban, and Puerto Rican authors.

PUCMM Regular University Courses

Following are some of the regular PUCMM courses available to CIEE students at Levels II and III. Not all courses are available every semester and some may require a prerequisite.

Levels II and III

Catholic Church in Today’s World
This course examines the historic vision of the Catholic Church from the era of World War II through Vatican II and from Vatican II through the New Millennium. Themes touch upon all of the most urgent problems affecting the world today, including changing culture and values, economic and social progress, marriage and the family, politics, religious thought, social justice, and world peace.

Catholic Sacrament of Matrimony
This course examines themes which Catholic doctrine teaches are rooted in the current family and matrimonial crisis. Such themes include egoism, violence, abortion, divorce, and the general crisis of values that are affecting our society and the world. The course seeks to turn the tide of the crisis by helping students discover a moral value in marriage and family as “an intimate community of life and love” that serves the Church and the world.

Christian Anthropology
This course attempts to explore all that it means to be human: including the origins of humankind; the greatness that is the human body and soul; humankind’s limitations, patterns of thought; and the capacity to relate to others in different societies, to relate to nature, and to relate to God. The aim is to instill in students a clear vision, through readings and discussions, of the role of Christianity in the rediscovery and re-evaluation of the dignity of the human being.

Dominican Economics and its Background
The fundamental characteristics of the Dominican economy and its environment and background are presented in this course. In particular, the course examines the country’s recent history and how this has impacted the principal sectors of its economy. Among the themes to be covered are macroeconomic indicators, sector analyses, political economics, and other themes that have affected the present state of the Dominican economy. (Macroeconomics prerequisite)

Economics I
This is a basic course that covers the economic terms and concepts that are necessary for an analysis of the problems inherent in modern economic theory. Among the topics covered are supply and demand, balance of trade, cost, and production, the market structure (both goods and capital), and microeconomics.

Foundations of Western Civilization
Students are introduced to the foundations of Western civilization from the Greeks, the emergence of Christianity through the Renaissance, and the rise of industrial capitalism. Emphasis is placed on Third World perspectives and the relationships between developing and developed countries, including the processes of decolonization, revolution, and cultural nationalism.

Fundamentals of Economics
This course introduces students to the study of economics in general, with a focus on macroeconomics. Topics include the international monetary finance system, national budgets, costs and trade balances, the public sector, and international economic development.

General Psychology
This is a general and scientific view of psychology as a science, and its evolution, methodology, and contemporary currents. The course focuses on the areas of learning, motivation, personality, and behavior.

History of Political and Social Ideas
This course examines the evolution of political and social ideas from the Ancient East through modern times with a focus on the principal historical events (markers) from which diverse concepts emerged and evolved. The aim of the courses is for students to gain an understanding of these events and their influences in historical context.

Human Sexuality
This psychology course provides an introduction to human sexuality in an integrated format that encompasses all of its multiple facets, both its normal and abnormal aspects, and the relationship between mental health and the exercise of sexuality as an integral element of the personality. Sexuality is seen from a physiological perspective, exploring its links to the psychological processes. Throughout, the course takes a critical approach toward the role of psychology as a viable agent for resolving any conflicts in the area of human sexuality. (Biology prerequisite)

Introduction to the Bible
This course provides an in-depth introduction to the Bible and its wide variety of versions and modern languages.

Introduction to the Dominican Reality
This sociology course encourages students to analyze human development in peripheral countries and the principal variables that have affected and created today’s Dominican socioeconomic reality. Topics covered include socioeconomic variables, gender roles, health, education, ecology, migration and immigration, and politics.

Introduction to Economic Development
This course offers a critical examination of theories of economic development in both advanced countries and developing regions, problems of development, and development policies, including some specific examples from the Dominican Republic.

Introduction to Environmental Sciences
This course brings home the planet-wide reality of the urgency to study the principles of ecology and associate them with the concept of sustainability. Furthermore, it encourages students to study services and their environmental costs in relation to the ecological, technical, economic, and social aspects that must be analyzed and incorporated into the process of development. It offers students a unique learning opportunity to integrate concepts, practices, and real research, in accordance with the environmental situation within each region, including the Dominican Republic. Students confront new situations and problems upon which they and their professor work scientifically, seeking solutions and alternatives to manage global problems in an environmentally sound and professional manner. (4 credits, including laboratory work).

Introduction to the Hospitality Industry
This course is aimed at introducing students to the wide range of distinct businesses and organizations within the tourism sector. Students study the importance of developing both the worldwide and local tourism industries, which encompass hospitality and services that go far beyond providing simple accommodation, transportation, and recreation to tourists and business people. There is a focus on the structure of the hotel and restaurant industries as the most important and most developed components of the tourism industry.

Introduction to International Commerce
This course introduces students to the operation of the international market (both of products and capital), the stock market and how values are set and maintained, methods of international payment and customs operations, and international agreements, including with their legal aspects and effects upon the world economy. The final unit in the course examines the specific case of the Dominican Republic. (Macroeconomics prerequisite).

Introduction to Philosophy
Students are introduced to the principles of philosophy and logic and their relationship to religion, mythology, and the natural sciences.

Introduction to the Scientific Research Method
Students gain an in-depth introduction to the logic of scientific procedures (the scientific method), while studying the differences between scientific knowledge and the generalizations of common sense.

Introduction to Sociology
This course covers the basic theoretical concepts of the science of sociology, focusing on topics that affect Dominican students’ lives, often without their awareness, such as social conduct and social inequalities caused by economic, racial, ethnic, and gender discrimination.

Introduction to Women’s Studies
This course explores the necessity of future Dominican professionals, in diverse career fields, to actualize their vision of equality. It presents a general panorama of themes related to the role of women in contemporary Dominican society (feminism, equity and empowerment, discrimination and sexual violence, self--esteem and identity, domestic violence, power relations and laborers, and women and poverty) with the aim of modifying the attitudes of both women and men with regard to gender and equality.

Jesus, the Person
Students examine various documents (including the Old Testament and ancient maps) and study Jewish society and religion at the time of the birth of Jesus. The course aims to introduce students to the events of Jesus’ life and death, his legacy, and, most importantly, to Jesus as a person.

Photography I
This course examines photography as a means to capture reality and its relevance as communication. Emphasis is placed upon both documentary and artistic results, including visual composition, the communication of ideas, the documentation of events, and the use of individual creativity to express feelings through photographic works. Each student must have a good quality digital or 35mm camera. (3 credits, including laboratory work).

Professional Ethics
This course examines Dominican society from the basis of its foundations in ethics and justice, and the principles and values that are indispensable for the healthy exercise of any profession. Students explore the aim of instilling a new moral conscience in Dominican professionals of the future. Readings and discussions include a review of ancient systems of morality and justice as taught by Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, St. Augustine, St. Thomas, the Old and New Testaments, as well as modern moralists like Kant and proponents of Existentialism.

Rural and Urban Sociology
Students examine agrarian and urban systems and social organization in the Dominican Republic from a historical perspective. The main topics include rural family organization and habitat, the agrarian economy and social relations, migration, urbanization, and industrialization. (Introduction to Sociology prerequisite).

Social Anthropology
The foundation of social anthropology is the life of man and how it is regulated by a particular society’s norms, beliefs, and values. Human cultures are very diverse and offer almost unlimited solutions to common human problems. In this course, students learn about these diverse cultures, and their responses to human problems, considering them within the terms of their specific societal structures. Students also analyze the nature of the culture that is manifested in Dominican society.

Social Doctrine of the Catholic Church
This course examines in depth the great documents related to the Catholic Church’s social doctrine, beginning with the encyclical Rerum novarum (1891) of Pope Leo XIII, which laid the foundation for the establishment of a society that offers respect, justice, and recognition of human dignity to all, especially to those who have been marginalized. Humanistic Christianism is compared and contrasted to Marxism and Existentialism, while exploring changing concepts of what justice means, in general terms, as well as in terms of distributive, legal, and social justice.

Sociology of Human Space
This course focuses on the regulative norms of human space, paying special attention to the concept and functions of territoriality among human beings, population density and social behavior, and the regulative norms of visual, auditory, olfactory, and tactile space. Cultural variations in the use and organization of human space is also covered, including a comparative review of Arabic, Japanese, and Dominican spatial relations in their trans-cultural contexts.

Women and Society
This course, with its in-depth focus on the evolving role of women in Dominican society, is taught in five modules, each by a different professor specializing in one of the five following areas: women and health; women, work, and production; women and education; women, language, and literature; and women and the communication media.

PUCMM One Credit Courses

The following classes are open to all CIEE students.

Arts: Artistic Drawing, Drama, Fundamentals of Fine Art, Guitar, Introduction to Singing, Modern Dance, Music Appreciation, Oratory, Painting, Photography, Sculpture, Silk-Screening, Stage Scenery Design

Dominican Dance and Folklore
Dominican folklore is introduced through regional dances and musical instruments. Students learn to dance traditional merengue, bachata, and salsa. (May be taken with other international students or with Dominicans.)

Physical Education: Baseball, Basketball, Judo, Karate, Rhythmic Gymnastics, Soccer, Swimming, Table Tennis, Tennis, Track, Volleyball

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