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Quick Info

Quick Info

By Term

  • Fall 2014
  • Spring 2014
  • Spring 2015
  • Academic year 2014-2015
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Dates:
09/01/2014 - 12/20/2014
Deadlines:
Extended to: 04/15/2014
Credit:
16 - 18 semester / 24 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
3.0 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
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Dates:
01/27/2014 - 05/17/2014
Deadlines:
Extended to: 10/15/2013
Credit:
16 - 18 semester / 24 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
3.0 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
TBA
Deadlines:
10/01/2014
Credit:
16 - 18 semester / 24 - 27 quarter hours
Eligibility:
3.0 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
09/01/2014 - TBA
Deadlines:
Extended to: 04/15/2014
Credit:
see credit information below
Eligibility:
3.0 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
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Study Abroad in Prague
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Program Overview

Program Overview

Staggering architecture, rich cultural history, a turbulent past and exciting future – Prague is as fascinating a city as it is beautiful. And with CIEE’s Central European Studies program, you’ll have the opportunity to make it your own.

Enroll in courses at prestigious, local universities, choosing from Czech language, and a host of academic courses exploring the dynamics of the country, its culture and place in the region.

Study abroad in Prague for access to the city's unusually rich cultural life—festivals, operas, and concerts—and in no time you’ll adopt the “Nejak bylo, Nejak bude” (“Somehow it went and somehow it will go”) attitude and make use of the city like a native Bohemian.

Study abroad in Prague and you will:

  • Enroll in courses not only at CIEE, but also in the Prague Film and Television School at the Academy of the Performing Arts (FAMU), one of the most prominent and renowned film schools in Europe, as well as at Charles University
  • Take advantage of Prague’s central location in order to see the many cultural sites of Czech Republic and other European cities such as Budapest, Vienna, Krakow, or Berlin which are just a train or bus ride away
  • Choose from three unique housing options—a CIEE-administered apartment, Charles University dormitory, or homestay with a local family
  • Discover Czech culture and become good friends with your Czech buddy, a local student of Charles University
  • Give back to the local community by volunteering or interning in a Czech organization
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The CIEE Difference

The CIEE Difference

Coursework

In addition to a Czech language class, choose from a wide selection of courses and subjects on Czech culture and society including history, media, art, religion, literature, and politics. Intern with a local NGO, or enroll directly in classes at Charles University. Interested in cinema or the performing arts? Take up to four courses from among those offered to international students by FAMU, Central Europe’s preeminent film school.

Excursions

study abroad in the Czech Republic

The study abroad program includes visits to sites of historical and cultural importance in Prague such as Prague Castle, Old Town, the historical halls of Charles University, theater, and opera. In addition, academically coordinated field trips to locations in Bohemia and Moravia are arranged, allowing you to gain a wider perspective of the region and a greater understanding of studied academic topics and Czech culture.

Cultural Activities

CIEE promotes and encourages cultural exchange between CIEE and CU students through an International Students Club. Many extracurricular activities are organized by ISC to provide opportunities for friendship, understanding, and social interactions. The club organizes activities based on student interest and works with other CU International Clubs to bring Czech and international students together.

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Dates, Deadlines & Fees

Dates, Deadlines & Fees

We want to make sure you get the most out of your experience when you study abroad with CIEE, which is why we offer the most inclusions in our fees.

The program fee includes:

  • Tuition and housing
  • Pre-departure advising and optional on-site airport meet and greet
  • Full-time program leadership and support
  • Field trips and cultural activities
  • CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits
Please note, program dates are subject to change. Please contact your CIEE Study Abroad Advisor before purchasing airfare. Click the button to view more detailed information about dates and fees as well as estimated additional costs. Please talk with your University Study Abroad Advisor about additional fees that may be charged by your home institution when participating in a program abroad.
Program
Application Due
Start Date
End Date
Costs
Fall 2014 (16 wks)
Extended to: 04/15/2014
09/01/2014
12/20/2014
$16,450

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, local transportation pass, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs
$13,048
Housing **
$3,000
Insurance
$102

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** Meals vary by housing choice: Includes two meals per day for homestay students. Breakfast is included for dormitory students. No meals are included for students in apartments. Additionally, students who opt for and are placed in single-occupancy dorm rooms will be billed a supplemental fee of approximately $500, 4-6 weeks after the program starts.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,850
International Airfare **
$1,200
Local Transportation
$50
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees ***
$125
Personal expenses
$2,200

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* For students in apartments. Students placed in homestays are provided with breakfast and dinner; additional meals for homestay students are estimated at $550 per semester. Students placed in the dormitory are provided with breakfast only; additional meals for dormitory students are estimated at $1,500 per semester.

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

*** average cost

More Information
Spring 2014 (16 wks)
Extended to: 10/15/2013
01/27/2014
05/17/2014
$16,450

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, local transportation pass, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs
$13,048
Housing **
$3,000
Insurance
$102

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** Meals vary by housing choice: Includes two meals per day for homestay students. Breakfast is included for dormitory students. No meals are included for students in apartments. Additionally, students who opt for and are placed in single-occupancy dorm rooms will be billed a supplemental fee of approximately $500, 4-6 weeks after the program starts.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,850
International Airfare **
$1,200
Local Transportation
$50
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees ***
$125
Personal expenses
$2,200

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* For students in apartments. Students placed in homestays are provided with breakfast and dinner; additional meals for homestay students are estimated at $550 per semester. Students placed in the dormitory are provided with breakfast only; additional meals for dormitory students are estimated at $1,500 per semester.

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

*** average cost

More Information
Spring 2015
10/01/2014
TBA
TBA

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

Estimated Additional Costs

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

More Information
Academic year 2014-2015
Extended to: 04/15/2014
09/01/2014
TBA
$31,300

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, local transportation pass, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs
$24,898
Housing **
$6,000
Insurance
$102

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** Meals vary by housing choice: Includes two meals per day for homestay students. Breakfast is included for dormitory students. No meals are included for students in apartments. Additionally, students who opt for and are placed in single-occupancy dorm rooms will be billed a supplemental fee of approximately $500, 4-6 weeks after the program starts.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$3,700
International Airfare **
$1,200
Local Transportation
$100
Books & Supplies
$200
Visa Fees ***
$125
Personal expenses
$4,400

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* For students in apartments. Students placed in homestays are provided with breakfast and dinner; additional meals for homestay students are estimated at $550 per semester. Students placed in the dormitory are provided with breakfast only; additional meals for dormitory students are estimated at $1,500 per semester.

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

*** average cost

More Information
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Eligibility
3.0 Overall GPA

Eligibility

  • Overall GPA 3.0
  • 1 semester of college-level European (especially Central European) studies recommended (i.e. history, sociology, economics, political science, language, or literature)
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Recommended Credit

Recommended Credit

Total recommended credit for the semester is 16–18 semester/24–27 quarter hours, and 32–34 semester/48–51 quarter hours for the academic year.

CIEE area studies, CU, and some FAMU courses have 45 contact hours and recommended credit is 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours per course; other FAMU courses have 24 contact hours and recommended credit is 1.5 semester/2.25 quarter hours per course. CIEE language courses have 115 contact hours and recommended credit is 4 semester/6 quarter hours.

Students may choose to take 3 credits or 6 credits at FAMU or Charles University. However, students are not required to take courses at FAMU or Charles University and can take a full credit load of CIEE courses.

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Program Requirements

Program Requirements

Study abroad students are required to take one Czech language course (including two weeks of intensive language training during orientation) and four area studies courses. All area studies courses are taught in English. Students take a minimum of two CIEE courses, and may be able to enroll in up to six credits outside of CIEE courses at FAMU or Charles University. Students may also take the CIEE Seminar on Living and Learning in Prague for an extra two credits.

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About the City

About The City

Because of its innumerable characteristic steeples, Prague is called the city of a thousand spires. This EU member is a perfect example of the steady development of a society which recently transitioned from its communist past. With a population of only 1.2 million, Prague has an unusually rich cultural life—festivals, operas, concerts, and cultural programs, many of which are accessible on a student budget. Study abroad students experience life similar to that of Czech students and make use of numerous neighborhoods in the city like native Praguers.

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Meet The Staff

Meet The Staff

Staff Image

Amanda Bell

Communication Program Coordinator

Amanda Bell received her B.A. in Cultural Anthropology from Michigan State University. Amanda first lived in the Czech Republic as a Rotary Youth Exchange scholarship recipient and has lived and worked in Prague for several years.

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Jana Cemusova

Resident Director

Jana Čemusová heads the CIEE Study Center in Prague, leading study abroad programs, customized partnerships with Charles University and other educational institutions. She served as a Student Services Director from 2008 to 2011. Prior to joining CIEE in a full-time position, Jana gained extensive experience with CIEE students through her many years of teaching and leading Czech language instruction through the CIEE Study Center at Charles University.

Jana has teaching experience as a Fulbright scholar at the University of Kansas, expertise in training language teachers, and leading projects in immigrant communities. She served as a chair of Association of Czech Teachers Teaching Czech as a Foreign Language in 2003 – 2009.

Jana is a double graduate at the Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Philosophy, where she studied Theory of Culture (Anthropology) and Czech Language and Creative Studies at the Faculty of Education.

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Roman Doric

Roman works for the CIEE Study Center in Prague as a Housing Assistant and his primal responsibilities are housing support, CIEE apartments maintenance, Flat Buddy program support, housing payments, attendance tracking, readers, syllabi, grades, database testing, and CIEE Prague Study Center building maintenance support. He started cooperation with CIEE Prague as a flat buddy.

Roman received his Masters degree in Applied Geoinformatics and Remote Sensing at Faculty of Natural Science, Charles University in Prague. He is a passionate traveler and has experience in assisting with Mobility Projects and providing customer services.

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Ivana Skenderija

Film Studies Progam Coordinator

Ivana Skenderija works for the CIEE Study Center as a contractor, Film Studies Program coordinator. She is the main liaison between CIEE and FAMU. She is primarily responsible for the FS program administration, coordination and development including assisting and advising FS students, leading cultural workshops and academic excursions. Her other agendas involve site visits planning and CIEE database testing and development.

Ivana has a Bachelor’s in Liberal Arts and Humanities from Charles University and a background in drama, education, and film. In 2014, she will be finishing her Master’s degree in General Anthropology.

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Veronika Tobiasova

Housing Coordinator

Veronika works for the CIEE Study Center in Prague as a Housing Coordinator and she is mainly responsible for housing management (dorm, apartments, homestay), solving student issues, Flat Buddy Program, Meet Czech Families and Friends, CIEE promotion, greening, etc.

Veronika received her Master’s degree in English and American Studies and Spanish Philology at Charles University in Prague, with specialization in American and Argentinean literature. During high school, she was an exchange student in Madison, WI for one year. She also studied at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid in Spain for a year.

Her previous working experience includes teaching both English and Spanish in different language schools and a high school in Prague. She also worked for a trade promotion agency and Peruvian Embassy.

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Eva Tomiskova

Program Coordinator

Eva Tomišková works for the CIEE Study Center in Prague as a Program Assistant and her main responsibilities involve orientation, academic trips planning, volunteering program coordination, site visit planning, catering and overall office management.

Eva is a graduate of The Technical University in Liberec, the Faculty of Education, with major in Social studies and English language.

Prior to joining CIEE, Eva gained extensive experience in human recourses and educational field not only in her home country but abroad as well.

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Petr Zak

Administrative Assistant

Petr "Franky" Žák, Administrative and Technical Assistant, has a B.A.in Economics from Charles University and previously worked with CIEE as a Flat Buddy to CIEE students.

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Where You'll Study

Where You'll Study

CIEE works closely with Charles University, the oldest university in Central Europe, to deliver courses to study abroad students at the CIEE Study Center in Prague. All CIEE courses are held at the CIEE Study Center, located at the historical site of Vyšehrad. Although the CIEE Study Center is not located in a Charles University building, CIEE courses are recognized by Charles University and taught by faculty from various Charles University faculties and institutes. Participants have the opportunity to take some classes outside of CIEE, directly at the Charles University campus and at FAMU, Central Europe’s preeminent film school.

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Housing & Meals

Housing & Meals

study abroad in the Czech Republic

Housing is included in the study abroad program fee. Provision of meals depends on the housing option. Students have several housing choices and are asked to select an option prior to departure.

Homestay with a Czech Family—This is the best option for students looking to fully immerse themselves in the Czech culture. Dinner and breakfast, on the family’s schedule, are included as is a single room. Homestays are typically located in residential areas, so students will have up to a 45 minute commute to the CIEE Study Center.

Charles University Dormitory— This dormitory houses approximately 35 CIEE and local students (CIEE Dorm Buddies). Breakfast is included and students can use the two modest kitchenettes available to prepare other meals. The dormitory is a 10 minute walk from the CIEE Study Center.

CIEE-Administered Apartments—Each CIEE apartment houses three CIEE students as well as one Charles University student (CIEE Flat Buddy). Apartments consist of two bedrooms with shared areas including a fully-equipped kitchen and bathroom. Please note that meals and Internet fees are not included with this option. CIEE apartments are located in various neighborhoods and require a maximum 35 minute commute to CIEE.

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Orientations

Orientations

Online Pre-Departure and On-Site Orientations

You'll begin your study abroad experience in Prague even before leaving home by participating in a CIEE online pre-departure orientation during which the resident director will share information about the program and site. A mandatory three-week orientation session, which includes an intensive language program, is conducted in Prague at the beginning of the program and will introduce you to the academic program, country, culture, extra-curricular options, program faculty, and provide practical information about living in the Czech Republic. You'll receive ongoing orientation on aspects of Czech culture through the elective course and individual appointments with the resident director.

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Internet

Internet

You are encouraged to a bring wireless-enabled laptop. Internet connections are available in the dormitory for free, and may be available in the apartments for an additional fee; service is often shared with CIEE flat buddies and other roommates. You will have free access to wireless connections and a computer laboratory during the week at the CIEE Study Center and at other Charles University facilities. In addition, Prague offers a good network of Internet cafés for a small fee.

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Culture

Culture

study abroad in the Czech Republic

The CIEE Study Center in Prague offers are wide-range of immersive opportunities. Flat buddies, local Charles University students are an integral part of student life. These buddies share day-to-day issues, help you better understand local cultural norms, and assist you with immersion into the Czech culture and Charles University student life. There is never a boring moment thanks to extracurricular student activities called Interest Groups, which are organized weekly by local students (CIEE Flat Buddies). These groups include politics, economy, and society, sport, film and theater, music, and art. An International Student Club organized by CIEE promotes and encourages cultural exchange between CIEE and Charles University—the focus of the club is on cooking, culture and holidays, and local trips. You will also have the opportunity to see the cultural and historic sites of the Czech Republic through academic field trips led by CIEE professors and staff. CIEE also organizes optional guided field trips to Berlin, Krakow, and Vienna with CIEE professors at an additional cost. Volunteer options are numerous, from teaching English at a local elementary school to working at various film festivals. Internships are an option if you are looking to get involved with Czech nonprofit or non-governmental organizations and can be highly competitive.

Cultural Activities and Field Trips

The program includes visits to sites of historical and cultural importance in Prague such as Prague Castle, Old Town, the historical halls of Charles University, theater, and opera. In addition, academically coordinated field trips to locations in Bohemia and Moravia are arranged, allowing participants to gain a wider perspective of the region and a greater understanding of studied academic topics and Czech culture. CIEE also organizes optional guided field trips to Berlin, Krakow, and Vienna with CIEE professors at an additional cost.

CIEE International Students Club (ISC)

CIEE promotes and encourages cultural exchange between CIEE and CU students. Many extracurricular activities are organized by ISC to provide opportunities for friendship, understanding, and social interactions. The club organizes activities based on student interest and works with other CU International Clubs to bring Czech and international students together.

Immersion

Volunteering

Volunteer opportunities are available in Prague. You may volunteer in both public and private-sector organizations such as NGOs, film companies, schools, and English language training programs. You can choose from several pre-screened volunteering positions with local, mostly non-governmental organizations, which may be involved in education, organization of international political conferences, local and global human rights issues, or library and administrative work in the field of economics.

Internship

You can choose from several pre-screened internship positions with local, mostly non-governmental organizations, which may be involved in education, organization of international political conferences, local and global human rights issues, film companies, or library and administrative work in the field of economics. You'll record your experiences in a journal, which is evaluated weekly during the internship, and complete a final research paper that includes what you learned during your experience at the organization. Evaluation is by assigned CIEE faculty, the internship supervisor, and the resident director. Students interested in a CIEE Internship must complete applications upon admission to the program and get approval from their home institution and CIEE prior to the start of the semester. Internship placements are made following an interview with organizations after arrival in Prague.

Flat Buddies

CIEE recruits and trains a group of local Charles University students who live with CIEE students in apartments and the dormitory. These flat buddies share day-to-day issues, help you better understand local cultural norms and standards, and assist you with immersion into the Czech culture and Charles University student life. These local students also help CIEE Prague staff with orientation, social events, and activities throughout the semester.

Interest Groups

Interest groups help smaller groups of students become more integrated into Prague culture and society. These groups include politics, economy, and society, sport, film and theater, music, and art. All of these groups include Czech students.

Language

Two weeks mandatory intensive Czech course is followed by two 50 minutes lessons during semester (total 115 hours). Afternoon activities such as shopping, orientation, and a scavenger Hunt are part of this course.

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Academics

Academics

The Central European Studies program offers students a series of specially designed courses in a wide range of academic disciplines taught in English by local faculty. Although there is no language prerequisite for participation in the study abroad program, students are required to take a Czech language course in order to better immerse themselves in local culture. The combination of Czech language and academic courses allows students to explore the dynamics of this Central European nation and its culture.

Academic Culture

CIEE courses are taught by professors who are both experienced and experts in their fields of study. Classes are often lecture-based, though professors welcome student-initiated questions and discussion. The lectures go beyond course readings and demand that students tie together their content and the materials independently.

Some instructors use videos, slides, and excursions as teaching aids. Courses meet twice a week for 90 minutes, or once a week for three hours. CIEE and the Prague Film and Television School at the Academy of the Performing Arts (FAMU) class sizes range from five to 30 students per course.

Study abroad students experience differences between the U.S. and Czech educational systems. This new academic environment is part of the challenge of studying in Prague and learning about the Czech Republic. Students must be aware that a high degree of self-motivation and self-discipline is required and that independent learning and active participation in class are necessary for achieving a satisfactory academic performance.

Resources such as library holdings in English and Internet access may be limited and students may need to seek these resources outside the CIEE Study Center at public libraries or other CU faculties.

Nature of Classes

CIEE classes are predominantly with other CIEE students; occasionally there may be a local or international student in the class as part of the Bridging Perspectives Program, a program which allows CIEE to diversify its student body. Participants who enroll in Charles University or FAMU courses take classes with CIEE and other international students.

Grading System

Grades (A-F with pluses and minuses) are assigned based on mid-term and final exams, research papers, class presentations, and/or additional assignments depending on the course. Class attendance is mandatory and is factored together with class participation into the final grade. Some academic trips and guest lectures are also part of the courses.

Language of Instruction

Czech
English

Faculty

Courses are taught by faculty affiliated with institutions such as Charles University, University of Economics, Academy of Performing Arts, Czech Academy of Sciences, and FAMU.
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Course Description

Course Description

All Courses

Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be cancelled due to insufficient enrollment.

CIEE Study Center Syllabi

To view the most recent syllabi for courses taught by CIEE at our Study Centers, visit our syllabi site.

Required CIEE Language Courses

CZEC 1001 PRAG, Beginning Czech Language, I

CZEC 1002 PRAG, Beginning Czech Language, II (Academic Year students in spring semester)

CZEC 1101 PRAG, Beginning Czech Language, Fast Track

CZEC 2001 PRAG, Intermediate Czech Language, I

CZEC 2002 PRAG, Intermediate Czech Language, II (Academic Year students in spring semester)

CZEC 3001 PRAG, Advanced Czech Language, I

These courses provide students with the basic skills needed to communicate on a daily basis, including grammar, conversation, listening, and reading comprehension. During the first two weeks, students study Czech language five hours each day. Students then continue language study with classes two days per week. Students are placed into classes based on language background. Contact hours: 115. Recommended credit: 4 semester/6 quarter hours. Instructors: UJOP staff

CIEE Area Studies Courses

AHIS 3001 PRAG

Art and Architecture of Prague
This course provides a survey of art and architecture, especially housing styles, which have influenced the development of Prague and other major European cities from the Middle Ages through the 20th century. Excursions to art galleries and related architectural monuments are combined with classroom lectures. Instructor: Marie Homerová

AHIS 3003 PRAG

Modern Czech Art: Czech Modern and Contemporary Art and Architecture
Combining classroom lectures with gallery visits, this course acquaints students with 20th century art movements and tendencies. Based upon the analysis of the oeuvre of key Czech artists and various topics, ranging from the expressions of Czech national identity in the finde-siecle art to the art produced under the Communist regime, the course tackles the social and political development of the Central European region. Instructor: Zuzana Štefková

AHIS 3005 PRAG

Czech Architecture and Design
The course focuses on the development of, and formal changes in, the built environment: architecture, interiors, furniture, and other objects of daily use (glass, fashion, metalwork, cars) from the Middle Ages to the present. It examines the transition of the Czech decorative art to mass produced design including the way of life and social changes in the 20th century and includes guided visits to related museum collections and galleries. Instructor: Daniela Karasová

ANTH 3001 PRAG

Anthropology of Czech Society and Culture
This course aims to introduce students with some of the most relevant historical and contemporary issues of Czech society and culture from an anthropological perspective. Based on ethnographic case studies, among other literary and visual sources, connections are made between memory and history, narrative and experience, change and continuity, past and present. Instructor: Elena Soler

CEAS 3001 PRAG

Czech and Central European History
This course gives an overview of the national history of the Lands of the Bohemian Crown, inhabitants of the region, and their neighbors, from the arrival of the Slavonic tribes to the present. It provides an overview of political, social, and cultural developments that have influenced the current state of affairs in the Czech Republic. Instructors: Jan Pařez and Vladimir Urbánek

CEAS 3002 PRAG

Contemporary Czech Culture: Alternative Literature, Music, and Lifestyles
For this class, contemporary Czech culture is studied not as the “most refined human endeavors,” but as “everyday culture.” The instructor, an urban anthropologist with hands-on experience in local subcultures, provides her analysis of the roots of Czech underground and alternative on the background of Prague’s genius loci. Current hot topics such as graffiti and street art, squatting, and the alternative music scene are discussed. Students study how young non-conformist Czechs have made use of popular culture, how they create their communities and identities, and how they try to join the creative stream. Instructor: Pavla Jonssonová

CEAS 3003 PRAG

Collective Identity in a Totalitarian Regime
This course examines the totalitarian oppression from the point of view of ordinary citizens in socialist Czechoslovakia. It focuses on the construction of collective mentality through everyday official/public and unofficial/private activities, including mass parades, ceremonies and performances, work relations, children’s education, housing schemes, or collective vacationing. The goal is to demonstrate the consequences of life in an oppressive regime: suppression of fundamental forms of civic interaction, such as independent public communication, and distortion of moral and behavioral norms. Instructor: Vanda Thorne

CEAS 3006 PRAG/COMM 3002 PRAG

Ethnic and Religious Identity and Prejudice in a Central European Context
The course will teach students how ethnic and religious affiliations shape group self-image and how they influence the way they are perceived by others. Students will be introduced to a number of insider's and outsider's group perspectives relevant to Central European context. They will learn how analyzing communication patterns helps to detect group prejudice. Students will be involved in practical qualitative research assignments. After finishing this course the students will be able to identify and describe religiously and ethnically shaped world views and their role in group self-perception and perception of religious/ethnic groups by others. They will be able to design proper methodology and to research communication patterns, thus allowing them to articulate an informed and scientifically justifyable opinion about the group attitudes related to ethnic/religious identity. Instructor: Peter Zvagulis

CINE 3009 PRAG

Czech Cinema
Students learn about the most important trends and moments in the history of Czech cinematography and examine films within their historical, political, and cultural context. This course includes weekly screenings of Czech films. The emphasis is put on the postwar period, particularly on the 1960s and contemporary cinema. Instructor: Petra Dominková

CINE 3011 PRAG

East European Cinema
This course studies the most important trends and movements in the history of Eastern/ Central European Cinema and puts film production within its historical, political, and cultural context, focusing on the postwar contemporary period. Subjects of study are featured films of Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, former Yugoslavian, and Soviet/Russian production. Instructor: Petra Dominková

CLST 3001 PRAG

Seminar on Living and Learning in Prague
The CIEE Seminar on Living and Learning in Prague is designed to improve students’ intercultural communication and competence while studying abroad by considering how the Czechs are different from and similar to themselves and others. The course offers opportunities, both in an outside the classroom, to develop insights and the skills necessary to interact effectively and appropriately, and to gain a better understanding and appreciation of the cultural richness of the Czech Republic. Contact hours: 25. Recommended credit: 2 semester/3 quarter hours. Instructor: Jana Čemusová, Resident Director

COMM 3001 PRAG/CEAS 3004 PRAG

Media Impact in Central Europe: Past and Present
This course examines the role and impact of international and domestic media on political developments in Central Europe, examining the way of doing journalism at Prague-based Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, and comparing it to the approaches of other media companies. The course looks at journalism, technology, and logistics used by RFE/RL during the Cold War, and at its current ways of providing information to areas of the world where the press is restricted or tightly controlled. Journalists from RFE/RL and other media are frequent guest speakers. A key aspect of the course is the focus on coverage of religious, ethnic, and other emotionally sensitive issues, and students gain special insights into coverage of current events. They learn about the dynamics of social tensions in transitional and post-communist societies, and how the media is contributing to shaping the history of countries faced with their legacy and with the new challenges of EU membership. Instructor: Petr Zvagulis

ECON 3003 PRAG

Comparative European Economic Systems
This course integrates two topics: economic analysis of European integration and comparative studies of economic systems of European countries and their dynamics. The course focuses not only on institutions of the EU, its policies, and economics of their functioning, but also on implications of differences between economic and social models of the member countries for the future stability and international role of the EU. Instructor: Vilém Semerák

ECON 3004 PRAG

The Economics of the European Union
The EU as we know it has been formed by three creative processes—deepening of the integration, enlargement of the EU, and economic transformation in former socialist countries. After introducing those processes and some theoretical background, different international and internal EU economic activities are broadly analyzed. Instructor: Tomáš Cahlík

ENVI 3001 PRAG

European Environmental Studies
This course examines the relationship between human society and the natural environment with a specific focus on the Czech landscape as a place for human-nature interaction. In addition the course explores European integration from an environmental perspective, the ecological footprint and problem of climate change, and environmental ethics in contemporary European society. Instructor: Jan Vávra

GEND 3002 PRAG

Gender in the Czech Republic and Europe
This course focuses on the definition and redefinition of gender norms and how these influence both expectations and actual lives of people in the Czech Republic and Central Europe, paying attention to how gender roles have been shaped by communism, post-communism, etc. It also examines the state of feminism in the post communist period and issues of minority women. Instructor: Blanka Nyklová

INRE 3001 PRAG/HIST 3001 PRAG

Europe and the United States: Transatlantic Relations Past and Present
Topics discussed include Europeanism and Eurasianism; the relationship between religion and politics in Europe and the U.S.; Czech, Polish, and British Pro-Americanism versus origins of German and other Anti-Americanisms; and the Cold War between communism and democracy as a conflict and solidarity between Europe and the U.S. Instructor: Miloslav Bednář

INSH 3003 PRAG

Internship
Qualified students choose from several pre-screened internship positions with local, mostly non-governmental organizations, which may be involved in education, film, organization of international political conferences, local and global human rights issues, and library and administrative work in the field of economics. Students record their experiences in a journal, which is evaluated weekly during the internship, and complete a final research paper. Evaluation is by assigned CIEE faculty, the internship supervisor and the Resident Director. Pre-approval must be obtained from the Resident Director and the student's home institution. Instructor: Jana Čemusová

LITT 3001 PRAG

Modern Czech Literature
This course focuses on Czech literature of the 19th and 20th century within the framework of European historical and literary developments and the phenomenon of literary modernism. It provides insights into the history of Czech cultural space. Experience with conceptual thinking on literature is recommended. Instructor: Lucie Merhautová

PHIL 3001 PRAG

Technology, Totalitarianism, and Individual
The course explores the relevance of philosophy on day-to-day social, political, economic, and cultural life. It focuses on the philosophical foundations of political and economic movements, as well as major cultural movements such as science and technology, post-modern art and literature, and popular culture in general. Among the themes discussed are the ontology of objectivity and subjectivity, relativism, consumerism, capitalism and communism, scientific positivism, philosophy of language, and art. Selected writings from the Czech poet/ dramatist and political activist/leader Vaclav Havel and the Czech philosopher Jan Patočka are studied alongside of the principle text Escape from Freedom by Eric Fromm. Instructor: Bill McGuire

POLI 3002 PRAG

Czech Politics
This course covers the roots and development of the political system now operative in the Czech Republic. Topics studied include: Czechs, Slovaks, and other national groups; political parties; the Velvet Revolution, and the Velvet Divorce. Instructor: Petr Štěpánek

POLI 3004 PRAG

Czech Concepts of National Identity
This course looks at issues related to the construction of the Czech national identity. The 19th century Czech national revival, the Czech/German conflict, and the women’s movement are studied, as well as the First Republic, German occupation, the Prague Spring of 1968, Normalization and the Velvet Revolution, and religion. Instructor: Peter Morée

POLI 3005 PRAG

The Politics and Economics of the European Union
This course explores the history, main institutions, and policies of the European Union. It focuses on the principal issues facing the EU today, especially with respect to enlargement into Central Europe. Instructors: Miloslav Bednář and Jiří Holub

POLI 3006 PRAG

Central European Politics
The course focuses on the comparative assessment of Central European political development. Discussion includes the problems and mechanisms of transition since 1989, the institutional and international framework of transition, and specific problems of democratization in Central Europe. Instructor: Jiří Holub

POLI 3010 PRAG / HIST 3002 PRAG

Central Europe and the Balkans in the Short Twentieth Century
What image did Central Europe and the Balkans have at the dawn of the 20th century and has this image changed ? If so, what were the changes leading up to its decline? Were these regions seen as lands of progress and prosperity, or merely as Europe’s backward periphery? In order to see a broader picture, this comparative course will go beyond national histories to trace common trends and the transformation in Central Europe and the Balkans. It will combine the perspectives of political, social and cultural history and will link macro-context with the history of everyday life and experiences of different social groups. Central Europe and the Balkans will be seen as a laboratory for social and political ideas, among them modernization, nationalism, federalism, nazism, fascism, communism, and democracy, with the European Union as the latest experiment. Instructor: Ana Kladnik

PSYC 3001 PRAG/POLI 3001 PRAG

Psychology of Transition and Transformation
The psychology of transition and transformation (political psychology in the Czech Republic) is studied with emphasis on the recent transition from totalitarianism to democracy. Topics include: political socialization, moral development and dilemmas, coping and ego defense mechanisms, immigration and cross-cultural adaptation, traumatic influence of the totalitarian past on the Czech society, post-totalitarian syndrome, and psychological problems of transformation. Instructors: Daniel Heller and Kateřina Machovcová

PSYC 3005 PRAG

Psychoanalysis and Society
This course seeks to explore the relation between psyche and society through an analysis of crucial contemporary and historical issues in Central and Eastern Europe, with a focus on the Czech Republic. Topics such as racism, sexuality, ecology, history, and politics are studied from a variety psychodynamic perspectives, juxtaposing the stark reality of the region’s history and culture with various psychoanalytic tools for understanding. The overarching theme of how mind and society co-evolve remains as a thread running through the course. Instructor: Joseph Dodds

PSYC 3004 PRAG

Psychoanalysis and Art
This course studies the area of overlap between psychoanalysis and art, including the mutual influences and inspirations between these two domains. It includes the psychodynamics of the creative process, psychoanalytic aesthetics and criticism of art, literature and film, and the therapeutic aspect of art including the contemporary clinical practice of art therapy with special reference to the Czech scene. In addition to topics such as Czech Surrealism, fairy tales, Kafka, and Svankmajer, the course offers experiential workshops in art therapy and a chance to make a stop-motion animation film. Instructor: Joseph Dodds

RELI

RELI 3003 PRAG

Introduction to the Kabbalah and Jewish Mysticism
The course, Introduction to the Kabbalah and Jewish Mysticism, aims at introducing students to one of the main aspects of Jewish religion. The beginnings of the Kabbalah can be traced to the early Christian era, and the main centers of the Kabbalah during the Middle Ages were in Germany and Spain. The student is not required to have any previous knowledge of the Kabbalah; knowledge of Hebrew is very helpful, but is not mandatory for the course. Whereas the three monotheistic religions often fought or even oppressed one another, the mystics of all three religions have always found a common language. The fact that the course will take place in Prague is of great significance, because of the Kabbalistic tradition, especially Rabbi Judah Loew Betzalel and Ezechiel Landau. The course objective is to show the student the profundity and beauty of Jewish Mysticism. Instructor: Josef Blaha

PSYC 3006 PRAG

The Third Force Psychology in a Central European Context
Environmental and biological naturalism have been the most prominent philosophy of science in the last hundred years. According to naturalism, human behavior and experience should be studied just like any other phenomena in the nature (e.g. living cell, chemical molecules or physical forces). Contrary to this belief, humanistic and existential psychologists insist that the study of human beings needs to be approached in a different way. The fact that human beings are largely aware of themselves and of their living situations make them a unique subject of study. In this course we will look at the necessary philosophical and psychological concepts and theories, such as limit situations, but we will connect them with real stories of people who lived in the Central European context in last 60 years. It will be our effort to understand the psychology of dissent and opposition towards totalitarian forces within society and individuals. Instructor: Milan Polák

RELI 3002 PRAG

History of the Jews in Bohemia and Central Europe
Through lecture, seminar, and excursions to historical sights, we examine the history of the Jewish community in Central Europe from the Middle Ages until modern times with a special emphasis on the role of Prague in the religious, political, and cultural life of the community. Instructor: Rabbi Ron Hoffberg

FAMU Cinema Studies Courses
Participants with an interest in cinema and performing arts may take up to 6 semester credits (up to 2 courses of 3 semester credits or 4 courses of 1.5 semester credits) from among those offered to international students by FAMU. A final list of FAMU courses is available at the time of enrollment. Some FAMU courses have prerequisites. Following is a representative sample of FAMU courses that have been available in past terms.

Acting Studio
This is a practical course for directors, producers, scriptwriters, cinematographers, or editors to understand the actor’s craft. Students proceed from exercises and various improvisations to a given text, a dialogue, and a monologue. At the end of each semester the student performs a piece in front of the camera and assesses the work on video. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester/2.25 quarter hours. Instructor: Dasha Blahova

Acting Theories
This course aims to cover essentials of acting theories—some historical, but mostly contemporary— in order to help film directors communicate effectively with actors from varying pedagogical and cultural backgrounds. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester/2.25 quarter hours. Instructor: Mary Angiolillo

Subversive Subjections
The course explores notions of individual and colletive identity, subjectivity and the self in the context of modern Czech literature. Following (and possibly contradicting) various aspects of the argument of ‘minor literature’ (Deleuze – Guattari), students will discuss the writing of Kafka, Hašek, Škvorecký, Kundera or Hrabal as conflictual sites of identity and difference, solidifying discoursive structures and invisible lines of flight and subversion, transcendence and immanence. Recommended credit: 3 semester/ 4.5 quarter hours. Instructor: Jan Matonoha / Richard Muller

Central European Cinema
This course provides a general overview of the primary trends, aesthetics, protagonists, and history of post-war Central Europe. National cinemas examined includes Hungary, Poland, Romania, and Czech, Slovak, and Yugoslav filmmaking. Recommended credit: 3 semester/ 4.5 quarter hours. Instructor: Dan Duta

Chapters from Film History and Criticism
This course presents the most important trends, moments, and personalities in European film history. Both film style and production modes are analyzed. Students watch films in their entirety or short examples illustrating particular topics. Recommended credit: 3 semester/ 4.5 quarter hours. Instructors: Michal Bregant and Petra Dominková

Cinematographer’s Influence
This course gives an explanation of the cinematographer’s craft in the fields of exponometry, processing, and other postproduction technologies. It analyzes the use of various exponometric (photometric) methods and their effectiveness on the aesthetic of cinematographic image. It is a lecture/seminar format and students are given theoretical and practical assignments. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester/2.25 quarter hours.Instructor: Michael Gahut

Circulating within the Modern Cinematic Image
This inter-disciplinary seminar is modeled on the epistemological notion of a U.S.-American informed postmodernity/globalization, which for ill or for better informs the conditions of possibility of our contemporaneity, and which by extension for us as such produces our individual-class-misson that pedagogically focuses a select band of becoming authenticallyglobal films from the following 20th century world directors: Sergei Eisenstein, Carl Theodor Dreyer, D.W. Griffith, Buster Keaton, Fritz Lang, Friedrich Murnau, Dziga Vertov, and Orson Welles with special consideration given to those cinematic moments that teach and that train us in new non-dominatory viewing strategies, in new creative ways of circulating (our term for moving). The role of silence and of the unconscious in film culture is given special coverage. Clips and special features from the DVDs are also shown. Recommended credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours. Instructor: Erik Sherman Roraback

Circulating within the Post-Modern Cinematic Image
This seminar is a select examination of eight major films in pre-1950 Euro-American film with special emphasis given to those cinematic moments that might teach and train us in new viewing strategies, in new ways of circulating, and in new ways of engaging with the cinematic image. Film criticism and film philosophy from Bersani-Dutoit and Gilles Deleuze is discussed. All films are either in English or have English inter-titles or sub-titles. Clips and special features are shown. Recommended credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours. Instructor: Erik Sherman Roraback

Documentary: Connection
This course is focused on exploring documentary cinema within its broad range of artistic and rhetorical methods toward representing reality -- from both a theoretical and empirical standpoint. At its foundation, the course will consider the theoretical approaches of Nichols, Bruzzi and Gauthier within the context of theories of representation (mostly Jost). Instructor: Vít Janeček

Introduction to The Soundtrack 1
The first part of the course focuses on the fundamentals of using sound to furnish meaning, whether for narrative, documentary, or abstract works. We follow the thread of production through the various elements that comprise a soundtrack, based on our real time limitations and available tools. Basic precepts, tips, and tricks: from conception to sound capture to edit to mix to output via the building blocks of the soundtrack including dialogue, narration, music, foley, ambient sound, and most importantly sound effect/sound design. Readings, bibliography, URLs, DVD examples, hardware, and software are provided. We work in the Final Cut and Soundtrack programs. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester/2.25 quarter hours. Instructor: Eric Rosenzveig

Introduction to The Soundtrack 2
The second part of the course on the soundtrack focuses on viewing/listening to primarily narrative feature films and analyzing their various approaches to making the soundspace. We also read theoretical texts on the soundtrack and film music and see how today's technology has made much of older existing theory somewhat redundant. In many classes we watch a single film, stopping and starting it and using it as a basis for both technical and aesthetic discussions: “How did they do this and why?” Recommended credit: 1.5 semester/ 2.25 quarter hours. Instructor: Eric Rosenzveig

Practical Analysis: Directing
This course shows students the way that experienced directors handle some of the most common film situations, such as introduction of the main character, first and last shot in the film, chasing scene, four persons talking around the table, a man getting out of the car, etc. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester/2.25 quarter hours. Instructor: Jasmina Blazevic

Principles and Technology of Photography
This course provides a better understanding of the technical and scientific aspects of photography and cinematography. It combines lectures with experiments, tests, and practical demonstrations. Subjects are treated from the standpoint of technique rather than science. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester/2.25 quarter hours. Instructor: Josef Pecák

Producer’s Craft
This course focuses on the work and art of a film and television producer, the craft of the person who serves as a) highly skilled and organized project manager, b) counterpart and/ or partner to director and screenwriter, and on occasion, c) creative author of a project. The key areas of information for a producer (and this class) are marketing, financing, budgeting, legal, and business affairs in the stages of project development, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution. Instructor: Petr Sládeček

The Realm of Montage (Editing)
“Film is like a battlefield: love, hate, action, violence, death... in one word—emotion,” says Samuel Fuller playing himself in Godard’s Pierrot le fou. Montage sequences create emotions in film, and they show not only the work of the editor but also the specific film language, thinking, and philosophy of the director. We study excerpts from well known films that express interestingly extreme and emotional life situations. Recommended credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours. Instructor: Bára Kopecká

Script Analysis
This course analyzes feature length films from a practical dramaturgical perspective, demonstrating dramatic structures, narrative techniques, and genres, while examining the process and craft of screenwriting. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester/ 2.25 quarter hours. Instructor: Pavel Jech

Tools of Directing
This course provides students with an in-depth perspective to many forms of directing: from directing newscasts to directing feature films. This course explores directing methods, the director’s tools, and his/her relationship with the actors and crew from a variety of perspectives including practical, theoretical, psychological, and physiological points of view. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester/2.25 quarter hours. Instructor: Petr Marek

Topics in Animation Film
Students gain a deeper knowledge of film animation, its possibilities, and priorities. The course consists of lectures followed by screenings of Czech and other animated films. Students write short analyses on special subjects of animation, which are then used as material for discussion. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester/2.25 quarter hours.

Topics in Avant-Garde Cinema
This course portrays the evolution of avant-garde film during the 20th century: different strains in avant-garde film movement (i.e. cinéma pur, non-objective film, surrealist film, formal film, structural/material film, found-footage film, assemblage and collage film, etc.) with the aim to illustrate possibilities of the film language (filmic devices, film technique, methods of montage, or animations, etc.) of non-narrative cinema. Every lesson is accompanied by many examples, screened on VHS. Recommended credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours. Instructor: Martin Čihák

Visual Theory
This course explores how photographs are constructed, analyzing the use of various aesthetic and design elements and the effects of these on the viewer. The format is lecture/ seminar, and students are given practical as well as theoretical assignments. Slide and video presentations support the content of the lectures. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester/ 2.25 quarter hours. Instructor: Beth Lazroe

FAMU Weekend Modules
These intensive courses are led by visiting film specialists (directors, screenwriters, producers, cinematographers, etc.). New modules are organized each semester. Current offerings are made available upon arrival in Prague. Examples of previously offered modules include:

Cinema Dance Workshop

The Transmutation of Light: Alchemy and Cinema

Marcus Bergner: What would happen if…? Investigating new possibilities for narrative film

Charles University Area Studies Courses
Students have limited access to a select group of elective courses at Charles University. Participation in each course is limited to a few CIEE students. CIEE students may take a maximum of six semester credits outside of CIEE courses. Classes are taught at Charles University and allow CIEE students to study alongside other international students. The following list is a sample of courses that may be available to CIEE students. A final list of available courses is distributed during orientation.

Art and Culture
Czech and European Art and Architecture Highlights of the Czech Theatre: Performance Analysis From Modernity to Avant-garde: A Survery of Modern Poetry Hollywood and Europe (Mostly Czech) Photography and Genius Loci Myth and Mythization in Central European Context Romanticism and National Identity in Central Europe Snapshots of Changing Landscape: Currents in post 1989 Czech Literature

Economics and Politics
Comparative Politics: Transformation of Czechoslovakia and Czech Republic Contemporary Central European Politics Political Philosophy of Central European Dissidence Recent Economic Development

History
Archaeology of Central Europe: Paleolithic Period Jewish History in Central and Eastern Europe“MITTELEUROPA”: Germany and East Central Europe in the 19th and 20th Century

Literature
American and Czech Literature from European Perspectives: Identity and Role Play Czech Short Stories Great European Writers: The Life and Work of Karel Čapek City Palimpsests: Prague, London, Petersburg in Modern Fiction

Sociology and Psychology
Landscape Sociology: Understanding of Czech and European Landscapes Language, Culture and Social Cognition Selected Topics of Social Psychology: Soft Skills Sociology: Globalization Topics in Education: Multicultural and Gender Issues in Central Europe

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