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Study Abroad in Prague
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Program Overview

Program Overview

If you attend the school where Einstein taught, will some of his genius rub off on you? That’s just one question we answer on our Central European Studies program in Prague. If physics isn’t your passion, maybe living in the same town where Mozart, Milan Kundera, and Rainer Maria Rilke plied their crafts will inspire you. CIEE places you into Prague’s intellectual and performing arts communities so you get a taste of the city’s fascinating past, present, and future.

Study abroad in Prague and you will:

  • Take courses at Charles University, where Einstein taught or the Prague Film and Television School at the Academy of the Performing Arts (FAMU) – one of the most prominent and renowned film schools in Europe.
  • Explore Prague as well as nearby cities, Budapest, Vienna, Krakow, or Berlin – each just a train or bus ride away
  • Choose from four housing options: a CIEE-administered apartment, CIEE-administered residence, Charles University dormitory, or homestay
  • Discover Czech culture and become good friends with your Czech Buddy, a local student at Charles University
  • Give back to the local community by volunteering or interning in a Czech organization
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Scholarships & Grants

Scholarships & Grants

We want as many students as possible to benefit from studying abroad. That’s why CIEE awards more than $5 million every year – more than any other international educational organization – to make study abroad affordable.

Applicants to this program are eligible for the following scholarships and grants:

  • Ping Scholarships for Academic Excellence
  • Ping Scholarships for Academic Excellence

    For students with a GPA or 3.8 or higher who excel in academic pursuits devoted to socially important areas of study. $2,500 per student.

  • Global Access Initiative (GAIN) Grants
  • Global Access Initiative (GAIN) Grants

    For students who demonstrate financial need, CIEE provides direct support for travel.

    Awards: Up to $2,000 per student

To be considered, simply check the “Scholarships and Grants” box on your program application.
Apply now

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The CIEE Difference

The CIEE Difference

Coursework

In addition to Czech language, choose from a wide selection of courses at Charles University on Czech culture and society including history, media, art, religion, literature, and politics. Interested in cinema or the performing arts? Take up to four courses from among those offered to international students by FAMU, Central Europe’s preeminent film school.

Excursions

study abroad in the Czech Republic

Get out and see Prague close up during visits to sites of historical and cultural importance, such as Prague Castle, Old Town, the historical halls of Charles University, the theater, and the opera. Academically coordinated field trips to locations in Bohemia and Moravia will allow you to gain a wider perspective and understanding of the region.

Immersion

Students can take part in an array of student-to-student programs, from sharing an apartment with a Czech student to participating in exciting extracurricular activities, tandem language exchanges, or the “Meet Czech Families” program. Give back to the local community – and practice your language skills in the process – during volunteering opportunities. You might teach kids ranging from kindergarten to high school, or work with people with disabilities. Or gain critical work experience with an internship.

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Dates, Deadlines & Fees

Dates, Deadlines & Fees

We want to make sure you get the most out of your experience when you study abroad with CIEE, which is why we offer the most inclusions in our fees.

The program fee includes:

  • Tuition and housing
  • Pre-departure advising and optional on-site airport meet and greet
  • Full-time program leadership and support
  • Field trips and cultural activities
  • CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits
Please note, program dates are subject to change. Please contact your CIEE Study Abroad Advisor before purchasing airfare. Click the button to view more detailed information about dates and fees as well as estimated additional costs. Please talk with your University Study Abroad Advisor about additional fees that may be charged by your home institution when participating in a program abroad.
Program
Application Due
Start Date
End Date
Costs
Fall 2016 (15 wks)
04/15/2016
08/31/2016
12/17/2016
$18,150

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, local transportation pass, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs
$14,807
Housing **
$2,925
Insurance
$118

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** Meals vary by housing choice: Includes two meals per day for homestay students. Breakfast is included for dormitory students. No meals are included for students in apartments. Additionally, students who opt for and are placed in single-occupancy dorm or apartment rooms will be billed a supplemental fee of approximately $500, 4-6 weeks after the program starts.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,850
International Airfare **
$1,200
Local Transportation
$50
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees ***
$125
Personal expenses
$2,200
Other ****
$145

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* For students in apartments. Students placed in homestays are provided with breakfast and dinner; additional meals for homestay students are estimated at $550 per semester. Students placed in the dormitory are provided with breakfast only; additional meals for dormitory students are estimated at $1,500 per semester.

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

*** average cost

**** Required Czech insurance

More Information
Spring 2017 (16 wks)
10/15/2016
01/25/2017
05/14/2017
$18,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, local transportation pass, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs
$15,458
Housing **
$2,925
Insurance
$167

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** Meals vary by housing choice: Includes two meals per day for homestay students. Breakfast is included for dormitory students. No meals are included for students in apartments. Additionally, students who opt for and are placed in single-occupancy dorm or apartment rooms will be billed a supplemental fee of approximately $500, 4-6 weeks after the program starts.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,850
International Airfare **
$1,200
Local Transportation
$50
Books & Supplies
$100
Visa Fees ***
$125
Personal expenses
$2,200
Other ****
$145

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* For students in apartments. Students placed in homestays are provided with breakfast and dinner; additional meals for homestay students are estimated at $550 per semester. Students placed in the dormitory are provided with breakfast only; additional meals for dormitory students are estimated at $1,500 per semester.

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

*** average cost

**** Required Czech insurance

More Information
Academic year 2016-2017 (37 wks)
04/15/2016
08/31/2016
05/14/2017
$34,500

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, local transportation pass, cultural activities, local excursions, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs
$28,232
Housing **
$5,850
Insurance
$118

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $500 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** Meals vary by housing choice: Includes two meals per day for homestay students. Breakfast is included for dormitory students. No meals are included for students in apartments. Additionally, students who opt for and are placed in single-occupancy dorm or apartment rooms will be billed a supplemental fee of approximately $500, 4-6 weeks after the program starts.

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$3,700
International Airfare **
$1,200
Local Transportation
$100
Books & Supplies
$200
Visa Fees ***
$125
Personal expenses
$4,400
Other ****
$290
Expenses during break *****
$1,500

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* For students in apartments. Students placed in homestays are provided with breakfast and dinner; additional meals for homestay students are estimated at $550 per semester. Students placed in the dormitory are provided with breakfast only; additional meals for dormitory students are estimated at $1,500 per semester.

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

*** average cost

**** Required Czech insurance

***** academic year students who wish to stay onsite are responsible for arranging their housing and meals during the semester break

More Information
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Eligibility
2.5 Overall GPA

Eligibility

  • Overall GPA 2.5
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Recommended Credit

Recommended Credit

Students are required to take 16 semester/24 quarter hours per semester.

CIEE area studies, CU, and some FAMU courses have 45 contact hours for 3 semester credits/4.5 quarter hours per course. Some FAMU courses have 24 contact hours for 1.5 semester credits/2.25 quarter hours per course. CIEE language courses have 60 contact hours for 4 semester credits/6 quarter hours.

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Program Requirements

Program Requirements

Study abroad students are required to take courses. All courses are taught in English, except Czech Language courses, taught in Czech. Students take a minimum of two CIEE courses, and may be able to enroll in up to nine credits outside of CIEE courses at Charles University or FAMU. Students may also enroll in the CIEE Intercultural Communication and Leadership course as one of the course options.

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About the City

About The City

Because of its innumerable characteristic steeples, Prague is called the "City of a Hundred Spires" and is one of the most beautiful cities in the world. This European Union member, and UNESCO World Heritage Site, is a perfect example of the steady development of a society that recently transitioned from its communist past. With a population of only 1.2 million, Prague has an unusually rich cultural life – festivals, operas, concerts, and cultural programs, many of which are accessible on a student budget. Study abroad students experience life similar to that of Czech students and frequent numerous neighborhoods in the city like native residents of Prague. Prague also offers a unique symbiosis of carefully preserved monuments of all periods and styles.

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Meet The Staff

Meet The Staff

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Jana Cemusová

Center Director

Jana heads the CIEE Study Center in Prague, leading study abroad programs through partnerships with Charles University, the Film and TV School of the Academy of Performing Arts (FAMU), and other local educational institutions. Jana is a double graduate of Charles University in Prague, where she studied theory of culture (anthropology) and Czech language and creative studies. Jana was a Fulbright scholar at the University of Kansas and has expertise in training language teachers and leading projects in immigrant communities. Prior to being named Center Director in 2011, Jana served as CIEE Student Services Director for three years. Before that, she taught and led Czech language instruction through the CIEE Study Center at Charles University. In addition to her duties as Center Director, Jana currently teaches the Intercultural Communication and Leadership course. She served as a chair of Association of Czech Teachers Teaching Czech as a Foreign Language in 2003–2009.

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Alicja Nemoudry

Program Coordinator

Alicja, who joined CIEE in 2014, assists in the overall management of the Central European Studies program and is primarily responsible for the day-to-day operations of the CIEE Study Center, program support, academic day and overnight field trips, excursions, volunteering program as well as administrative and editorial support. As a part of regional CIEE team, provides front line services to students and faculty. Prior to joining CIEE Alicja has spent several years living and working abroad. Alicja has an undergraduate degree in History of Art and postgraduate diploma in Art and Business from the University of Aberdeen. She has several years of experience in customer service sector, which she gained during her work in the Scottish art galleries and auction house.

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Lenka Osicková

Housing Coordinator

Lenka joined CIEE in 2014, and is mainly responsible for housing management (dorms, apartments, residences and homestays), housing assignments, housing-related issues, and the Flat Buddy and Homestay Buddy Programs. Lenka graduated from University of Hradec Králové with a bachelor in management of tourism. During her studies, she was an exchange student at Chang Jung Christian University located in southern Taiwan for a semester. She also studied at Universidade de Coimbra in Portugal. Her previous working experience was abroad in Canada working in administrative field and in Portugal where Lenka gained experience in customer service working for IBM. During her studies Lenka volunteered as a buddy for the Erasmus study abroad program.

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Ivana Petrželová

Students Services Assistant

Ivana joined CIEE in 2015 and assists with enrollment, visa processing, course registration, and interest group activities. Ivana is a graduate of Charles University, with a bachelor’s degree in Czech language and literature. Prior to joining CIEE, Ivana worked for three years at Charles University as a program coordinator for international and exchange students, gaining valuable insight and experience in the field of international education.

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Richard Stock, Ph.D.

Academic Director

Rick is originally from the Chicago area, but has lived in the Czech Republic since 1998. Rick received his B.A. in Teaching of English and his M.A. in Literature and Theory from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Rick defended his Ph.D. dissertation at the Charles University Faculty of Arts, and is an Assistant Professor in the English Department at the University of South Bohemia. His research and teaching interests are in contemporary American literature and literary theory. Prior to joining CIEE as Academic Director in 2015, Rick worked at CERGE-EI in Prague as Assistant Professor and Head of the Academic Skills Center, Director of the Ph.D. program, and most recently built the MAE program. Rick also has taught in other private, English-language universities in Prague, and at CIEE teaches a course on Franz Kafka.

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Eva Tomišková

Student Services Director

Eva has been part of the CIEE team since 2011, and is responsible for office management, logistical management of the CES program, and management of Faculty-Led and Custom programs in Prague. Eva also oversees the student services team. Eva is a graduate of the Technical University in Liberec, the Faculty of Education, with a master´s degree in social studies and English language. Prior to joining CIEE, Eva gained extensive experience in human resources and educational field not only in the Czech Republic and internationally.

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Petra Uvirova

Central European Studies Resident Coordinator

Petra Uvírová joined CIEE Study Center in Prague in 2014 and is responsible for overall coordination of Central European Studies program. Petra is also manages health and safety services for students enrolled in all Prague programs. Petra studied at the Metropolitan University of Prague and graduated with a master´s degree in International Relations and European Studies. Petra brought her experience in international education from the U.S. where she lived for past five years, where her professional experience included serving as an International Student Advisor in Boston, Massachusetts.

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Where You'll Study

Where You'll Study

The location of the CIEE Study Center is in its own premises at Vyšehrad, at the top of one of Prague’s highest hills, within medieval castle walls in a beautiful parklike setting. The area was once a legendary seat of Czech royalty before the Prague castle was established, and is about 15 minutes from the Old Town area. All CIEE Charles University classes are held in the CIEE Study Center. CIEE students can also take courses at FAMU, the international film academy, and Charles University. FAMU classes are held in the FAMU building downtown. Charles University classes are held at two locations downtown. Charles University in Prague, the oldest in Central Europe, was founded in 1348 by King Charles IV of Bohemia. It was open to all nationalities with instruction in Latin. One of the original Gothic buildings remains and is known as the Karolinum. Charles University doesn’t have a campus proper; its buildings are spread all over Prague and in towns outside of Prague.

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Housing & Meals

Housing & Meals

study abroad in the Czech Republic

Housing is included in the study abroad program fee. Provision of meals depends on the housing option. Students have several housing choices and it is mandatory to select an option prior to departure in the housing survey.

Homestay with a Czech Family — This option provides an excellent opportunity for immersion into the local culture, and is strongly recommended for students who wish to take full advantage of their Czech experience. Dinner and breakfast, on the family’s schedule, are included, as is a single room. While families will help students practice their Czech language skills, many family members also have basic English communication skills. Homestays are typically located in residential areas, so students will have up to a 45 minute commute to the CIEE Study Center. Interenet is provided.

Charles University Dormitory — Students who choose this option reside in single or double rooms (singles are limited and at an additional fee). This dormitory houses CIEE and local students (CIEE Dorm Buddies). Vyšehrad dormitory is located in a residential neighborhood with a number of local restaurants. Dormitory facilities include Internet access and modest kitchenettes. A simple breakfast is included in the dormitory option. The dormitory is a 10 minute walk from the CIEE Study Center. Internet is provided.

CIEE-Administered Apartments — CIEE apartments are located in the buildings where other tenants/citizens live. Students are sharing the apartment with a flat buddy who is a Charles University student. Kitchen and bathroom facilities are shared with apartment mates. Please note that meals are not included with this option. CIEE apartments are located in various neighborhoods and require a maximum 35 minute commute to CIEE. Internet is provided.

CIEE-Administered Residence Hall — There are two CIEE Administered Residences. The residence consist of apartments where only CIEE students and their flat buddies live. There are two options in the residence: one-bedroom apartments for two CIEE students and two/three-bedroom apartments that house three to five CIEE students as well as Charles University student (Flat buddy arranged by CIEE). Singles are typically very limited and available for an additional fee. The commute for residence hall students to CIEE is a maximum of 35 minutes; the downtown area can be reached in 10-20 minutes. Internet is provided.

It is important for students to be aware that commuting is a part of daily life in Prague and most housing options require daily use of public transportation. A transportation pass is provided by the program. While every effort is made to fulfill the student’s housing preference, alternative housing may be assigned due to capacity limitations. Housing is not co-ed and housing allocations are made on a first come, first served basis. Students from the same institution are not put in the same housing as students requesting to live with friends are not allowed.

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Orientations

Orientations

Online Pre-Departure and On-Site Orientations

You'll begin your study abroad experience in Prague even before leaving home by participating in a CIEE online pre-departure orientation, during which resident staff will share information about the program and site. A mandatory two and a half week orientation session, which includes an intensive language program, is conducted in Prague at the beginning of the program and will introduce you to the academic program, country, culture, extracurricular options, program faculty, and provide practical information about living in the Czech Republic. You'll receive ongoing orientation on aspects of Czech culture through the elective course and individual appointments with the resident coordinator

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Internet

Internet

You are encouraged to bring a wireless-enabled laptop. Internet connections are available in the homestay, dormitory, apartments and residences for free. You will have free access to wireless connections and a computer laboratory during the week at the CIEE Study Center and at other Charles University facilities. In addition, Prague offers a good network of Internet cafés for a small fee.

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Culture

Culture

study abroad in the Czech Republic

The CIEE Study Center in Prague offers a variety of program activities, including cultural workshops, guest lectures, high cultural events, volunteering, and the Tandems program or Meet Czech Families program.

Cultural Activities and Field Trips

The program includes visits to sites of historical and cultural importance in Prague such as Prague Castle, Old Town, the historical halls of Charles University, the National Theater, or the State Opera. In addition, academically coordinated field trips to locations in Bohemia and Moravia are arranged, allowing participants to gain a wider perspective of the region and a greater understanding of studied academic topics and Czech culture. You can also join optional guided field trips to Krakow, Vienna, or Berlin at an additional cost.

Immersion

Volunteering

Volunteer options are numerous, from teaching English at a local elementary school to working local non-governmental organization. Students have volunteered at film companies, schools, and English language training programs. You can choose from several pre-screened volunteering positions with local, mostly non-governmental organizations, which may be involved in education, organization of international political conferences, local and global human rights issues, or library and administrative work in the field of economics.

Internship

You can choose from several pre-screened internship positions with local, mostly non-governmental organizations, which may be involved in education, organization of international political conferences, local and global human rights issues, film, the library, or administrative work in the field of economics. You'll record your experiences in a journal, which is evaluated weekly during the internship, and complete a final research paper that includes what you learned during your experience at the organization. Evaluation is by assigned CIEE faculty, the internship supervisor, and the resident director. Students interested in a CIEE internship must complete applications upon admission to the program and get approval from their home institution and CIEE prior to the start of the semester. Internship placements are made following an interview with organizations after arrival in Prague.

Flat Buddies

CIEE recruits and trains a group of local Charles University students who live with CIEE students in apartments and the dormitory. These flat buddies share day-to-day issues, help you better understand local cultural norms and standards, and assist you with immersion into the Czech culture and Charles University student life. CIEE Flat Buddies organize weekly activities in line with students’ interests in politics, economy, society, sport, film and theater, music, and art. There is never a boring moment thanks to extracurricular student activities!

Interest Groups

Interest groups of Czech and international students help smaller groups become more integrated into Prague culture and society. These groups include sport, film and theater, music, art, culture, and community services.

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Academics

Academics

The Central European Studies program offers students a series of specially designed courses in a wide range of academic disciplines taught in English by local faculty. Although there is no language prerequisite for participation in the study abroad program, students are encouraged to take a Czech language course in order to better immerse themselves in local culture. The combination of Czech language and academic courses allows students to explore the dynamics of this Central European nation and its culture.

Academic Culture

CIEE courses are taught by professors who are experts in their fields of study. Classes are often lecture-based, though professors welcome student-initiated questions and discussion. The lectures go beyond course readings and demand that students independently link together lecture content with readings.

Some instructors use videos, slides, and excursions as teaching aids. Courses meet twice a week for 90 minutes, or once a week for three hours. Class sizes at CIEE and the Prague Film and Television School at the Academy of the Performing Arts (FAMU) range from five to 30 students per course. Study abroad students experience differences between the U.S. and Czech educational systems. This new academic environment is part of the challenge of studying in Prague and learning about the Czech Republic. Students must be aware that a high degree of self-motivation and self-discipline is required and that independent learning and active participation in class are necessary for achieving a satisfactory academic performance.

Resources such as library holdings in English and Internet access may be limited and students may need to seek these resources outside the CIEE Study Center at public libraries or other CU faculties.

Nature of Classes

CIEE classes are predominantly with other CIEE students. Occasionally there may be a local or international student in the class as part of the Bridging Perspectives program. CIEE students take classes with Charles University and FAMU students, allowing all students involved to get a more international perspective.

Grading System

Grades (A-F with pluses and minuses) are assigned based on mid-term and final exams, research papers, class presentations, and/or additional assignments depending on the course. Class attendance is mandatory and is factored together with class participation into the final grade. Some academic trips and guest lectures are also part of the courses.

Language of Instruction

Czech(language courses)
English

Faculty

Courses are taught by faculty affiliated with institutions such as Charles University, University of Economics, Academy of Performing Arts, Czech Academy of Sciences, and FAMU.
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Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

All Courses

Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be canceled due to insufficient enrollment.

CIEE Study Center Syllabi

To view the most recent syllabi for courses taught by CIEE at our Study Centers, visit our syllabi site.

Provided below are course descriptions for all the area studies courses that CIEE students have available. These include courses at the CIEE Prague Study Center, courses at the Film and TV School (FAMU), and courses at Charles University (ECES).

CIEE Language Courses

CZEC 1001 PRA

Beginning Czech Language, I
This language course provides the linguistic tools necessary both for students to make themselves understood as well as to enable them to gain a better understanding of the way of life in the Czech Republic. Successful communication is the main goal.
Throughout the course, lessons will be sequenced from presentation activities to guided practice activities to communicative activities. Because language practice should be meaningful, it will be communicative and based on situations with the emphasis on "real" language. Listening activities also be incorporated into the lessons as much as possible to improve students' aural abilities. The material covered during the semester will be "spiraled" and reviewed so as to build upon and reinforce the students' knowledge base of newly presented structures of the semester as well as older knowledge from the previous semester or previous studies; in terms of supporting students' retentive minds.

This course is designed to:

  • develop students' practical knowledge of the Czech language
  • allow students to function in everyday situations, (i.e., restaurants, grocery stores, ticket inspections, dorm, etc.) so as to allow greater integration with Czech culture and society
  • promote greater confidence in speaking the Czech language
  • provide the most basic foundation necessary for gaining conversational ability
  • limit the amount of formal grammar study to a minimum
  • focus on situations, pronunciation, and understanding basic phrases

CZEC 1002 PRAG

Beginning Czech Language, II

(Academic Year students in spring semester)
This course is designed for students who have:

  • some previous knowledge of grammar, vocabulary and syntax
  • are interested in continuing their study of Czech (or other Slavic languages) into the future (as part of their academic program, or for the other reasons) or want to able to communicate better while living in the Czech Republic
  • desire a rigorous knowledge of Czech language basis in fields of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary

CZEC 1101 PRAG

Beginning Czech Language, Fast Track
This course is designed to:

  • develop students' practical knowledge of Czech
  • allow students to function in everyday situations, (i.e. ordering in restaurants or cafes, shopping at grocery stores, dealing with ticket inspections, asking for a key in a dorm, etc.) so as to allow greater integration with Czech culture and society
  • promote greater confidence in speaking Czech language
  • provide the most basic foundation necessary for gaining conversational ability, limiting the amount of formal grammar study to the minimum, and focusing instead on situations, pronunciation, and understanding basic phrases

CZEC 2001 PRAG

Intermediate Czech Language, I
This is a course for students who have prior experience with Czech and decent knowledge of Czech.

This language course has been designed to provide the linguistic tools necessary both for students to make themselves understood as well as to enable them to gain a better understanding of the way of life in the Czech Republic. Successful communication is the main goal.

CZEC 2002 PRAG

Intermediate Czech Language, II
(Academic Year students in spring semester)
This is a course for students who have prior experience with Czech and decent knowledge of Czech.

This language course has been designed to provide the linguistic tools necessary both for students to make themselves understood as well as to enable them to gain a better understanding of the way of life in the Czech Republic. Successful communication is the main goal.

CZEC 3001 PRAG

Advanced Czech Language, I
This is a course for students who have prior experience with Czech and decent knowledge of Czech.

This language course has been designed to provide the linguistic tools necessary both for students to make themselves understood as well as to enable them to gain a better understanding of the way of life in the Czech Republic. Successful communication is the main goal.

CIEE Area Studies Courses

AHIS 3001 PRAG

Art and Architecture of Prague
The focus of the comprehensive course is the architectural, artistic and urban development of Prague as a typical example of a European city. The City of Prague represents an illustrative model for learning the significant attributes of European art, architecture and urban history throughout centuries. The course is also focused on historical and aesthetic concepts related to the development of the city from the past to the present. On the basis of studying different styles throughout the history of Prague, the development of European (or American cities in modern history) can be studied too. The course is predominantly focused on the architecture and urbanism, but the survey of the art creates its indispensable part.

One of the crucial learning goals of the course is to provide the students an opportunity to learn about the historical background and everyday life in the European past as well as present. Our learning about the art, architecture and the town development will based on the knowledge and understanding of the general philosophical concepts of European or world history. Therefore the course embraces multicultural dimensions. Prague, which modern history was influenced by two totalitarian systems, and belonged to the cities behind the Iron Curtain until 1989, is also used as an illustration of the development of the art and architecture in both totalitarian regimes of the 20th century. Totalitarian history of art and architecture shows, how the tools of propaganda worked in such regimes in contrast to the art and architecture created in liberal and democratic conditions.

CIEE Central European Studies Courses

AHIS 3003 PRAG

Modern Czech Art.
This combined seminar and lecture aims to acquaint students with aspects of Central European visual culture from the modern era onwards. It will introduce major art styles and personalities in Czech modern art (from Art Nouveau's Alphonse Mucha and the pioneer of abstraction František Kupka to contemporary provocations of David Černý). Deep changes that occurred in architecture (from Art Nouveau decoration through Functionalist utopia to deconstruction of Postmodernism) will be introduces and discussed. All artworks will be examined within their broader cultural and historical context. Students will be given the opportunity to visit many Prague galleries and museums to encounter and study in detail the originals.

AHIS 3005 PRAG

Czech Architecture and Design
The course focuses on the development and formal changes in the built environment, architecture, interiors, furniture and other objects of daily use (ceramics, glass, jewelry, metalwork, fashion). By means of presentations and films as well as visits to Prague galleries, exhibitions, museums, specialized shops, and artists' studios and workshops it mediates their formal and typological transformation from the past (cca 19th century) to the present time in Europe, Bohemia, Czechoslovakia (since 1918, Czech Republic since 1993) related to Europe and overseas (USA).

AHIS3006 PRAG

Czech Art in the Age of the Internet
This combined seminar and lecture aims to acquaint students with the rapidly changing Czech art scene from the 1989 Velvet revolution onwards. We will start with Postmodernism, adopted during the late socialist period of the 1980s and move towards recent strategies of Post-internet art. Placing the artworks within their broader cultural and historical concept offers new perspectives on Czech post-communist society and problems it is facing (construction of new democratic identities, gender inequality, xenophobia, political corruption, social injustice or construction laws). Artists were helped in their endeavors by a growing range of "new media" (photography, video or scientific methods) as well as newly transformed classical media (drawing, painting or sculpture) lately incorporated into the Internet and influenced by social networks (Facebook, Twitter or Instagram). Students will be given the opportunity to visit many Prague galleries, both public and private ones, encounter artists, curators and/or art critics.

ANTH 3001 PRAG

Anthropology of Czech Society and Culture
Various Central and Eastern European countries of the former socialist bloc up to 1989 had essentially the same political and economic system, and "recently" were undergoing what is seen as the same kind of transformation from a totalitarian political system to democratic pluralism and from centrally planned to a market economy, even though there are considerable differences among them. Following the work of L. Holy, among other scholars, we will investigate the specific ways in which Czech cultural meanings, and, in particular, how the culture constructed notion of Czech identity/es have affected life under communism, its overthrow during the Velvet Revolution in November 1989, and the political and economic transformation into a new social system. This course aims to introduce students to the historical as well as the contemporary issues of Czech society and culture from an anthropological perspective. Based on several ethnographic case studies, among other literary and visual sources, we will make connections between the memory and the history, the narrative and the experience, the change and the continuity, the past and the present.

ARTS 3001 PRAG / POLI 3019 PRAG

Communism and Nazism Reflected in the Arts
Up to today, film, literature, and the arts in general have played a central role in reflecting attitudes in Central and Eastern Europe towards the twin ideologies of Nazism and Communism. They were central to propagandizing these ideologies as they built in strength after World War One and were also the most vibrant forum for those challenging the totalitarian regimes established by Nazis and Communists. In the periods since their fall, politics and academia has frequently failed to enable an accessible debate on their legacy and so film and literature remain the site of debate. This course will explore this theme in a multi-disciplinary way, drawing on history, political science, literature, film studies, and psychology. There is a broad and deep amount of material to draw upon which will allow students to easily inquire into areas of particular interest to them. In order to reinforce the point that the issues we are examining have meaning across regions and times, we will work thematically rather than chronologically. In this course we will be mixing approaches to how we explore the issues. Prague is one of the few capitals that experienced liberal democracy, Nazism, Communism, and a return to liberal democracy in little more than 50 years. As such, many opportunities emerge to meet people and visit events which can increase our understanding of the topic.

CEAS 3001 PRAG

Czech and Central European History
The course focuses on the history of what is now the Czech Republic (Bohemia and Moravia) since primeval times till present (prehistoric times, medieval Czech state, Early Modern Ages, Bohemian Crown lands under the Habsburg Monarchy, Czechoslovakia, and the Czech Republic) considering historical-geographical context. It will also cover the history of the inhabitants of this territory (ancient prehistoric cultures, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavic tribes, Czechs, Germans, Jews, Slovaks and others) as well as a description of general features of their political, social and cultural life. The basics of Central European history are included, especially in the case of periods when historical events of Bohemia and Moravia were closely connected to period international situation.

CEAS 3002 PRAG

Contemporary Czech Culture: Alternative Literature, Music, and Lifestyles
In this class, students will study the contemporary Czech culture not as the "most refined human endeavors" but as an everyday culture. Cultural studies and urban anthropology connect to the instructor's hands-on experience in local subcultures. Czech underground and alternative heroes are presented within the background of zeitgeist and genius loci. Current "hot" topics - graffiti and street art, squatting and indie music scene - are discussed. Students study ways of how young non-conformist Czechs have made use of popular culture and how they create their communities and identities.

CEAS 3003 PRAG

Collective Identity in a Totalitarian Regime
This course examines the totalitarian oppression from the point of view of ordinary citizens in socialist Czechoslovakia. It focuses on the construction of collective mentality through everyday official/public and unofficial/private activities, including mass parades, ceremonies and performances, work relations, children's education, housing schemes, or collective vacationing. The goal is to demonstrate the consequences of life in an oppressive regime: suppression of fundamental forms of civic interaction, such as independent public communication, and distortion of moral and behavioral norms.

CEAS 3006 PRAG/COMM 3002 PRAG

Ethnic and Religious Identity and Prejudice in a Central European Context
The course will examine the role of ethnic/religious identity in group prejudice in Central European context and its geopolitical, cultural, ideological and ethical implications. It will explore the function of communication in large groups and in mass movements and the opportunities it provides for social research. Comparison of the Anglo-American and Continental European traditions of social research will provide insights into complementarities of the two approaches and potential richness for new methodological approaches in the field of communication research. Exploring the historical circumstances in which particular social research scholarship has developed will provide students with more realistic understanding of the scientific process. The course will also discuss the mutual influence of society and social research and the benefits and dangers of this dynamic for democracy. The students will learn how to identify research problems and build adequate research methodologies. They will be given opportunity to design their own research methodology. This course will enhance students' critical thinking and provide them with the understanding of decisive role of connecting the theory and praxis. The theoretical knowledge and research skills acquired in this course will help the students to make competent decisions in their future careers, directly or indirectly dependent on social research: media, advertising, business management, politics, intelligence and law enforcement, and sociological research institutions - to name just a few.

CINE 3006 PRAG

History through Film: Europe between Hitler and Stalin: A Search for Identity
This unique interdisciplinary course is designed to discuss and question the identity of specific nations in European space, which has always been a fascinating crossroads of interesting ideas and ideologies, as well as the birthplace of wars and totalitarian regimes. The course will cover masterpieces of Russian, Hungarian, German, Georgian, Polish and Czech cinematography, focusing on several crucial periods of history, in particular WWII and its aftermath as well as revealing the bitter truth and brutality of Stalinist years. Students will be exposed to brilliant and often controversial works of film art, reflecting on the moral dilemmas of individuals during stressful times in history. Course participants will thus map the European space through the medium of film, analyzing the individual approach to historical events, while at the same time gaining a general picture of Europe during its crucial periods. Last but not least, they will learn to appreciate European film art through a very open discussion following each screening.

CINE 3009 PRAG

Czech Cinema
The aim of the course is to discuss the most important trends and movements in the history of Czech cinema and also to put the films within their historical (political and cultural) context. Also, we will discuss how Czech films capture the life of the Czech society during various epochs (1960s - 2010s). Each lecture is focused on particular genre, epoch, or movement. In addition, we will learn how to analyze the film form and style as well as acquaint ourselves with various approaches towards film criticism. During the course students will watch selected feature films in their entirety (with English subtitles) and short extracts illustrating the topic.

CINE 3011 PRAG

East European Cinema
The aim of the course is to discuss the most important trends and movements in the history of post-war East European Cinema and also to put the films within their historical (political and cultural) context. Each lecture is focused on particular national cinema. In addition, we will learn how to analyze the film form and style as well as acquaint ourselves with various approaches towards film criticism. During the course, students will watch selected feature films in their entirety (with English subtitles) and short extracts illustrating the topic.

CINE 3012 PRAG

Uses and Misuses of Propaganda in European Film
It could be said that all films are propaganda because they convey messages consciously or unconsciously. However, this course, through the use of a wide range of clips, and relevant texts, will look at two kinds of propaganda in films, the overt and the covert, and the different categories within each type. Thus there is a distinction to be made between the Propaganda film that does not disguise its intentions to influence and even to convert audiences, and those films that have an ideology embedded in it, be it a western, thriller, comedy or melodrama. The course, which will be mainly structured chronologically, will take a contextual and intertextual approach to the subject, while seeking out the specificity of cinema.

The course will be supplemented and illustrated by the use of clips from films, and one or two complete feature films, to which the students will be expected to apply historical and critical analyses, seeing films from different perspectives. In other words, students will be required to learn how to 'read' films. They will also be expected to contribute to in-class discussions.

COMM 3001 PRAG/CEAS 3004 PRAG

Media Impact in Central Europe: Past and Present
This course examines the role and impact of international and domestic media on political developments in Central Europe, examining the way of doing journalism at Prague-based Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, and comparing it to the approaches of other media companies. The course looks at journalism, technology, and logistics used by RFE/RL during the Cold War, and at its current ways of providing information to areas of the world where the press is restricted or tightly controlled. Journalists from RFE/RL and other media are frequent guest speakers. A key aspect of the course is the focus on coverage of religious, ethnic, and other emotionally sensitive issues, and students gain special insights into coverage of current events. They learn about the dynamics of social tensions in transitional and post-communist societies, and how the media is contributing to shaping the history of countries faced with their legacy and with the new challenges of EU membership.

COMM 3004 PRAG

American Media's Impact on Post-Communist Czech Media
This course examines the influence of the American media model on media in the Czech Republic. The course will in this context mostly focus on the Television news. Students will get an introduction to American cultural influence in Europe and how this developed after the end of World War II, but specifically in Central Europe after 1989. The course will then focus on the existing various media models and will in detail analyze the American, or North American media model. Through studying Television news items in both the United States and the Czech Republic students are challenged to answer questions such as: In what way is there an American cultural influence in Europe, specifically in Central Europe? What falls under the definition of the (North) American Media Model? Has this media model influenced the (Television) news in the Czech Republic? What effect does this influence have on the Czech news? Does the Czech news have its own identity? If so, how can it be described? Is this identity in danger because of American influence? Is this a one-way influence, or is the American media influenced by European factors as well?

COMM 3301 PRAG

Intercultural Communication and Leadership
In this class, you will develop skills, knowledge, and understanding that will help you communicate and engage more appropriately and effectively in [host city] as well as in other intercultural contexts. We will explore various topics in intercultural communication in the context of your experience abroad, and will practice intercultural learning processes that you can apply when working across difference in a wide variety of contexts. You will increase your own cultural self-awareness and develop personal leadership skills to help you become more effective in an interdependent world.

ECON 3003 PRAG

Comparative European Economic Systems
This course integrates two topics: economic analysis of European integration and comparative studies of economic systems of European countries and their dynamics. The course focuses not only on institutions of the EU, its policies, and economics of their functioning, but also on implications of differences between economic and social models of the member countries for the future stability and international role of the EU.

ECON 3004 PRAG

The Economics of the European Union
The European Union (EU) as we know it has been formed by three creative processes - deepening of the integration, enlargement of the EU and economic transformation in former socialist countries. After introducing those processes and some theoretical background, in this course different EU economic policies are thoroughly analyzed. The EU and its role in the world is in this course systematically compared and contrasted with the USA. The course focuses on how to use "elegant" theoretical frameworks in a meaningful way. By the end of the course, each student will not only have a clear understanding about European integration, but also be able to communicate the acquired information in a condensed and clear way to anyone with basic training in analytical methods.

ECON 3005 PRAG

Economies in Transition
This course focuses on transition economies, i.e. CEE countries that underwent the change of economic model from socialism to a market economy. These countries are described as giant economic laboratories in which the governments experimented with alternatives to the market economy as well as with ways how to reintroduce a functioning market economy after 1989. Firstly, we will theoretically define the basic elements of the socialist centrally planned economy. Then we will explore some historical case studies of its rise and end, including the reasons for it. Thus, the course will not only help students understand the reasons for failures of central planning, and used strategies for the transition back to the market economy, it will also enable them gain a deeper insight into the current economic and social situation in the CEE markets and other countries experiencing a similar change (e.g. China). The experience and problems of the transition countries are very relevant in the current world, in which many politicians ask for alternatives to traditional capitalism. Although the lectures and readings will contain lots of empirical evidence and data, emphasis will be put upon understanding the logic and economics of the analyzed processes.

ENVI 3001 PRAG

European Environmental Studies
The course aims to present various aspects of the relationship between human society and natural environment from the viewpoint of social sciences. Global, European and Czech issues are covered in the course. The course offers insight into some branches of social sciences focused on the human-environment relationship, like environmental sociology, environmental philosophy, ecological economics, etc.

The core of the course is focused on the current environmental issues. These include political and social aspects of environmental protection (both Czech and global cases); global environmental challenges (climate change, energy and resource demand, positive and negative aspects of development) and practical examples of Czech environmental problems and Czech landscape as a unique place of long-term human cultivation of nature. The interconnection of social, economic and ethical context of the environmental issues is stressed throughout the course.

FILM 3002 PRAG

The Holocaust in the Films and Literature of Arnost Lustig
The course examines the Holocaust-Shoa from the perspective of the prominent Czech prose and screen writer Arnost Lustig (1926-2011). Professor of literature and film at universities in the USA, Israel and the Czech Republic, Arnost Lustig captured the emotional memory of the catastrophe that befell European Jewry in general, and Czech Jews in particular. For his 23 collections of short stories, novels and non-fiction he gained three nominations for the Nobel Prize in Literature.

His imaginative works of fiction and essays were translated into over 20 languages, including English, Hebrew, German, French, Spanish, Polish, Estonian, Finnish, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Hindi and Korean. Five of the books were made into award-winning films by the directors of the Czechoslovak New Wave during the 1960's. At this time, his Booker Prize nominated novel "Lovely Green Eyes" is under contract to the creators of "Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe," and the production of his novel "Colette" has just been completed as a Czech and Slovak co-production.

To put the Holocaust-Shoa into historical context, the course will acquaint the student with the key historical facts, and offer visits to some of the key sites, which are relevant to the understanding of the Holocaust-Shoa.

The instructor is Josef Lustig, Ph.D., the author's son, a documentary filmmaker and archival researcher, and translator of some of his father's writings into English.

FILM 3003 PRAG

Hollywood and Europe
This course offers insights into the historical and present day relationships between Hollywood and Europe. The course focuses on the content and themes of a range of films including Mission to Moscow (1943), Roman Holiday (1953), Notting Hill (1998), Inglourious Basterds (2009), and Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted (2012), as well as cross-media phenomena like stars and marketing campaigns, and reception documents such as tourist board press releases and audience interviews. By considering these artifacts in relation to the industrial, social, cultural, and political circuits through which they flow, students will consider issues relating to cultural imperialism, Americanization, globalization, and the national.

FILM 3004 PRAG

The Feminine Aura in Film
This interdisciplinary course contrasts the construction of the feminine in male-directed features with the portrayal of typically masculine-themed topics (such as war) in female-directed films. The films are grouped according to themes (violence, insanity, incarceration, rebellion) and each film is paired with a theoretical text. The texts range in style from film criticism, gender theory, cinematic narration, and film philosophy. Readings include but are not limited to: James Monaco, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, Laura Mulvey, Charles Baudelaire. Films screened are by Claire Denis, Kathryn Bigelow, Alfred Hitchcock, Jean-Luc Godard, Vera Chytilova among others.

GEND 3002 PRAG

Gender in the Czech Republic and Europe
The aim of the course is two-fold. Firstly, it examines the basic concepts of the gender order - masculinities and femininities, sexualities, etc. - both in the CEE region and more globally, thus providing students with basic factual knowledge. Secondly, it strives to sensitize students to gender as well as to equip them with means of analysis of the gender order. By combining these two approaches the students learn about past and present gender regimes in the CEE region and beyond. They also learn to detect and analyze gender-relevant issues paying special attention to the period and place (i.e. context) concerned.

The course reader combines more general texts with case studies from different countries in the region in order to draw the students' attention to the diversity often overlooked when referring to concepts such as the "Eastern Bloc". There are differences to be found both among the respective countries and among the seemingly universal theoretical texts on gender and their local counterparts. The texts in the reader serve as a springboard for class discussions. Moreover, there are documentaries as well as excerpts from movies to supplement them.

HIST 3003 PRAG

Tribal Myths and Traditions of the Czechs
Many historical personas and phenomena which the Czechs are familiar with may remain a mystery to foreigners because of the lack of the context. These omnipresent fragments of history are shared by the members of a society and usually are modified by various ideological and political intentions - what eventually results in a creation of national myth/myths.

The course focuses on various forms of myths: pre-Christian (arrival of Czechs), Christian legends (St Wenceslas), folk tales, the "national" myth of the so called Czech National Revival, modern state-forming myths (Czechoslovak legionnaires), urban (the Springman) and connects it also to various traditions, e.g. folk customs in the course of the year, as well as traditional skills like beer brewing, fish farming etc.

HIST 3005 PRAG

Mitteleuropa - Germany and East Central Europe from 1848 to 2004
The course will focus on the history of the entity known as "Mitteleuropa" in the last two hundred years from a German perspective: different definitions and ideological uses of this concept, analysis of its moving boundaries, sometimes including Germany, sometimes not. The main themes studied in the course will be the unification of Germany and its rise as a great power, compared to the decline of the Habsburg Empire and the (re)birth of new states following World War I. We will analyze the rise of extremism in the 20s and 30s, especially National Socialism and its impact on the countries of Central Europe, including World War II and its consequences, the disappearance of Central Europe and Communist rule over Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia and East Germany. We will end the semester with the rebirth of Central Europe after the end of Communism.

HIST 3006/POLI 3014 PRAG

Cold War Confrontation, 1941-89
Cold War Confrontation, 1941-89, traces the relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union, from the beginnings of their tense wartime alliance until the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe in 1989. The early part of the course will concentrate predominantly on the Soviet-US confrontation in Europe following the establishment and consolidation of Communist regimes in Eastern and Central Europe from 1944-48. Particular attention will be paid to the events of February 1948 in Czechoslovakia and to the Berlin Airlift crisis of 1949. The period of the relaxation of East-West tensions which followed Stalin's death in 1953 is examined through a focus on negotiations over the fate of Austria and Germany, and the upheavals in Poland and Hungary in 1956.

From its European beginnings, the course will branch out to consider the Cold War in its global context, especially in its relationship to Third World nationalism, non-alignment and anti-imperialism. The final weeks will examine the crushing of the Prague Spring, the period of Détente and the sudden and largely unanticipated end to the conflict in the 1980s, with a particular emphasis on the revolutions in Central and Eastern Europe in 1989.

HIST 3007 PRAG / RELI 3004 PRAG

Towards the Final Solution: Racism and Anti-Semitism in Western History
Towards the Final Solution is a course that traces the historical development of racial prejudice and anti-Semitism, from their roots in the classical and mediaeval worlds to the rise of National Socialism in the early 20th century. The course examines the manner in which religious, cultural, linguistic and physical/biological forms of exclusion have overlapped and reinforced each other. It is one of the principal contentions of this course that National Socialism's exterminatory anti-Semitism is not merely a product of centuries of anti-Jewish prejudice; rather, racial anti-Semitism must be understood as something which evolved in close symbiosis with racial prejudices directed against Africans - slave and free - and colonial peoples from the early modern period onward, culminating in the historically-particular form of exterminatory racial anti-Semitism which formed the necessary precondition of the Holocaust. A particular focus of the course will be the rise of exclusionary racial, anti-Semitic and nationalist discourses in Central Europe from the middle of the 19th century until the Final Solution.

HIST 3008 PRAG

The Habsburg Empire: A Political and Cultural History
This course focuses on the political and diplomatic history of the Habsburg Empire, from the emergence of the Habsburg dynasty to the dissolution of Austria-Hungary at the end of World War I. Emphasis is put on key turning points, such as the reign of Maximilian I and his marriage policy, the figure of Charles V, the Battle of Mohacs and the birth of a Central European Empire, the Counter-Reformation, the enlightened absolutism of Maria Theresa and Joseph II, the system of Metternich and the reign of Francis Joseph. This provides the framework for the analysis of interdisciplinary questions, such as the role of religion or the multinational Empire, with the aim of bringing to the fore the uniqueness of the culture developed in the Empire.

INRE 3001 PRAG/HIST 3001 PRAG

Europe and the United States: Transatlantic Relations Past and Present
This course focuses on a comprehensive study of history, ideology and the development of the main characteristics and policies of the Old and New Europe and the European Anti-Americanism. We will discuss Europeanism and Eurasianism, examine the relationship between religion and politics in Europe and the U.S. Furthermore, we will compare and analyze the Czech, Polish, and British Pro-Americanism, learn about the Cold War between the communist part of Europe and the U.S. and the divisive issues, as well as cooperative warm ties (including its origins) between Europe and the U.S.

INSH 3003 PRAG

Internship:Work Experience and Seminar
This three-credit course combines both on-site work experience and a seminar to meet both the needs of today's university students and satisfy the academic requirements of CIEE and Charles University.

The Council on International Educational Exchange offers an internship opportunity for its students through the Central European Studies Program and the Communications, New Media, and Journalism Program. This internship opportunity responds to a clear necessity among multicultural societies: the need to educate young people abroad by offering them an opportunity to gain professional experience to complement their academic experience. The core of this education is a significant on-site work experience, both in terms of time spent and the tasks completed.

Apart from the on-site work experience, this internship program has a strong and challenging academic component that exposes students to the world of non-governmental organizations, education, social services, and the media industry in the Czech Republic and the European Union. The aim of the seminar is to broaden students' perspectives of their international professional experience through a series of guided discussions, a professional journal, a final project and presentations, in addition to required reading and other classroom activities. The seminar helps students to evaluate their development in the workplace during their on-site work experience, through discussions of organizational theory and intercultural skills for business.

JOUR 3001 PRAG

International Reporting
This is a practical journalism course that provides students with an unrivaled opportunity to learn the craft of the foreign correspondent right in the Czech Republic. Students will discover what makes foreign reporting different from domestic reporting by doing it. That means focusing on the issues foreign reporters frequently cover in the Czech Republic and other transitional countries including education, health, gender, history, the arts, corruption, politics, drugs, minorities, tourism and intriguing personalities. Students will have a chance to fine tune their news and feature writing skills and interviewing tactics in four well researched-articles. We will continuously review current foreign reportage in a variety of media to see what we can glean from the best and the worst. Stimulating debates on style, ethics and story structure are guaranteed. Guest speakers will be real, live foreign correspondents from outlets such as Bloomberg, the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. There will be visits to political hot spots (Parliament, Radio Free Europe) and other sites representing journalistic areas of interest.

JOUR 3004 PRAG

Social Media's Revolutionary Impact on Journalism and Society
This course will examine the tremendous impact of social media on many walks of life, with a special emphasis on how social media have been transforming the profession of journalism and how the public now consumes news and information. We will, however, look beyond the field of journalism to consider how social media and online communities are profoundly affecting the ways in which young people form their identities and then how those identities develop later in life. Special sessions will tackle the influence of social media on relationship building and gender differences; race relations and racial identity; activism; the law; and marketing. We will look at many of these issues in the context of Central and Eastern Europe and compare the "Western" experience of social media with the situation in the post-communist world.

LITT 3001 PRAG

Modern Czech Literature
The course focuses on Czech literature of the 19th and 20th century within a broader framework of parallels to European historical and literary development, in particular in connection to topics related to the phenomenon of literary modernism. It is intended both for students of literature, and for students generally interested in the history of Czech cultural space.

The course starts with romantic beginnings of modern literature in 1830s. The romantic poet K. H. Mácha portrayed nature as the genuine home of an individual. Few decades later it starts to be the city that represents the actual existential environment. The capital of Czech lands appears in countless novels, stories and poems, it is often personified, has mythical or dreamy features, it is viewed as beautiful, magic, ordinary or dangerous - according to the particular individual, cultural, social and historical perspective as well as to genre and aesthetic standpoint (realism, symbolism, decadence, surrealism etc.). The course focuses on modern fiction as well as on romantic, symbolist (decadent) and avant-garde poetry.

LITT 3002/ANTH 3002 PRAG

Interpretation of Czech Fairytales
Fairytales are a significant part of human culture and contain a lot of information about the world around us as well as about ourselves. This information may be distorted, masked, deformed or hidden; that is why fairytales have been attracting the attention of various fields of knowledge. There are various theories searching for the disguised meanings of fairytales and the significance which they contain and refer to.

This course seeks to introduce the area of Czech fairytales as a genre within its broader historical, geographical, and cultural context. Furthermore, it describes and surveys the changes of the approaching fairytales within the development of scholarship about them. The course provides students with basic knowledge of historical, psycho-analytical, and philosophical interpretations, as well as anthropological or religious types of theories, but also biological and gender or feminist methods of their interpretation.

The course respects the connection of the fairytale to other folklore narrative forms like legend, fable and myth, but at the same time defines the fairytale as a specific genre. It touches upon the topics like ethical or moral principles in fairytales, gender and social roles, or historical and political influences to fairytale adaptations.

LITT 3003 PRAG

Prague-German Literature: Passion, Madness, Murder, and Memory
This course examines German-language literature written in Prague from the late 19th to the late 20th century with specific attention to the ways that the authors conceived of spatial relationships and addressed issues of identity. The works will be analyzed in the context of major historical developments such as the rise of nationalisms in the late 19th century, World War I, the founding of the First Czechoslovak Republic, World War II, and the nearly absolute disappearance of German-Bohemian literature after the 1940s. A primary goal is to provide a deeper understanding of the political, social, and cultural background to what has commonly referred to as the "Prague Circle" of Prague-German authors during the interwar period, by taking into account the broader context of German life and literature in Bohemia and Moravia. The time period in which these authors emerged was marked by turmoil and crisis. The traumatic effects of World War I, the Czech-German conflict, and the rise of Nazism all fund curious expression in the writing of these authors. The end of the course examines the loss of the German and Jewish populations in Bohemia and considers the legacy of these authors in contemporary Czech society and (Central) European culture more generally.

LITT 3004 PRAG

Franz Kafka: A Prague Writer
Franz Kafka (1883-1924) has become recognized as one of the leading figures in world literature. Perhaps more than any other major author, Kafka is associated with one geographical location: the city of Prague. Kafka's works themselves are not explicitly about Prague, nor are they set in Prague. But we cannot say that Prague is irrelevant to Kafka's works, for Kafka spent almost all of his life in the city. Therefore, we cannot "read" Prague through or into Kafka's works, but comparing the two is surely fruitful. The most obvious connection between Kafka's works and the city of Prague is Franz Kafka the historical person. While one always wants to be cautious about biographizing creative work, this course will take into consideration Kafka's life and times in reading and analyzing his fiction. Such an adventure is best undertaken in the city of Prague itself. Kafka's fiction that will be read in the course are organized in a chronological manner, along with relevant critical material for each work. However, less time-bound thematic issues will also be addressed in a less linear fashion, such as the cultural and historical interaction with the fiction, Kafka's development as a writer, the impact of Kafka's biographical story on his stories, Kafka's use of animal characters, and the narrative innovations that Kafka implemented. The course will focus on a selection from Kafka's many well-known short stories and one of his three novels. Kafka's works will be studied in English translation; they were originally written in German.

PHIL 3001 PRAG

Technology, Totalitarianism, and Individual
The course explores the relevance of philosophy to day-to-day social, political, economic, and cultural life. It focuses on the philosophical foundations of political and economic movements, as well as major cultural movements such as science and technology, post-modern art and literature, and popular culture in general. Among the themes discussed will be the ontology of objectivity and subjectivity, relativism, consumerism, capitalism and communism, scientific positivism, philosophy of language, and art. The meaning of "human being" in a metaphysical, psychological/psychoanalytical and ontological manner will be explored together with the idea of "administered reality"-a predominant characteristic of post-war, industrialized societies-and the possibility of individual freedom in the face of it. All philosophical ideas will be applied to and discussed in the context of the Czech society's post-war experiences. Selected writings from the Czech poet/dramatist and political activist/leader Vaclav Havel and the Czech philosopher Jan Patocka will be studied alongside texts by Arendt, Fromm, Marcuse and Žižek, among others.

POLI 3001/PSYC 3001 PRAG

Psychology of Transition and Transformation
What happens when you suddenly find yourself in the society of unknown rules and most of your previous knowledge is useless? What are the psychological pre-conditions but also consequences of the political changes in 90ies and how can we account for them in psychological terms? How can we link it to some social issues moving the Czech society now? Those will be the key questions students will elaborate in this course, which is open to students of all disciplines, however the focus is on psychology not history or other disciplines. Different theoretical perspectives would be used, while critical social psychology would be main theoretical source. Communist regime was strongly linked with regulated socialization in chosen institutions and forced civil participation, which in fact meant people exiled to private life and resigned on authentic community participation. Has this changed so far?

The course will apply some general psychological terms and theories and use them for explanation of experiences of totalitarian past on the Czech society and individuals. Students will have a closer look at the transformation of the health and social services, particularly in regard to mental health.

POLI 3002 PRAG

Czech Politics (Relearning Democracy)
This course compares Czech politics with the USA and the EU. It includes both the history of electoral politics in the Czech Lands and Czechoslovakia and the current state of affairs. Examples of successful and unsuccessful attempts to improve local democracy through community organizing, coalition building, conflict, consensus, whistleblowing, etc. will be included, using examples from both the United States and the Czech Republic. Democracy in transition will be taught since many societies were shaped in times of rapid economic growth, during the change of political or economic system, or during wars. Local and regional governments, international treaties, and other less visible forms of the Czech legal order will be discussed. Students will also be required to follow on-line reading materials, because English-language textbooks covering contemporary Czech Politics are virtually non-existent. Student participation and concrete examples will be an important part of every lecture. Students will be required to read and discuss articles on the Czech Republic from The Prague Post, The Prague Business Weekly, The Economist, The Spectator, and from Internet sources.

POLI 3003 PRAG

Rise and Fall of Central European Totalitarianism
Today liberal democracy seems to be the obvious winner of the ideological struggle of the twentieth century. It is therefore hard to understand why the two main alternatives to liberal democracy - Nazism and Communism - exercised such a power over the lives and minds of people of Central Europe throughout the larger part of the twentieth century. This interdisciplinary course aims at explaining this conundrum through systematic study of totalitarian practices. First, it will provide a basic theoretical outline and criticism of the term "totalitarianism". This will be followed by analysis of the ideologies of the "Totalitarian Twins", i.e. Communism and Nazism, which both grew from a perceived crisis of liberal democracy. The main focus of the course will be on methods by which the two regimes ruled over their citizens going beyond the obvious themes of fear and terror and looking at the role of economic policy, propaganda, leader's cult, and media and art in securing the conformity of the citizens.

POLI 3004 PRAG

Czech Concepts of National Identity
This course looks at issues related to the construction of the Czech national identity. The 19th century Czech national revival, the Czech/German conflict, and the women's movement are studied, as well as the First Republic, German occupation, the Prague Spring of 1968, Normalization and the Velvet Revolution, and religion.

POLI 3005 PRAG

The Politics and Economics of the European Union
The very existence and the radical enlargement of the European Union is becoming one of the defining events of the early twenty-first century. The students will get acquainted with history and ideology of the European unification process. The emergence and transformation of political institutions is an essential part of the course. The collapse of communist regimes in Central and Eastern Europe posed new challenges that lead to the necessity to write a new comprehensive document: the Lisbon Treaty. Continuous attention will be paid to both the current monetary crisis and the political process in respective member states.

POLI 3006 PRAG

Central European Politics
This course is designed to enhance the students' knowledge of Central European developments during and after the democratic revolutions 1989. The class will focus on the democratic revolutions in 1989, the institutional and international framework of the transition process and specific problems of democratization in Central Europe. One of the most important part of this course will be discussion of the main turning points of modern political history of respective countries of Central European geopolitical space and undertaking some comparative research into similarities and differences of such developments. In addition to it, we will explore constitutional systems of the CE countries (Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Austria and Hungary).

POLI 3010 PRAG / HIST 3002 PRAG

Central Europe and the Balkans in the Short Twentieth Century
What image did Central Europe and the Balkans have at the dawn of the 20th century and has this image changed ? If so, what were the changes leading up to its decline? Were these regions seen as lands of progress and prosperity, or merely as Europe's backward periphery? In order to see a broader picture, this comparative course will go beyond national histories to trace common trends and the transformation in Central Europe and the Balkans. It will combine the perspectives of political, social and cultural history and will link macro-context with the history of everyday life and experiences of different social groups. Central Europe and the Balkans will be seen as a laboratory for social and political ideas, among them modernization, nationalism, federalism, nazism, fascism, communism, and democracy, with the European Union as the latest experiment.

POLI 3015 PRAG

Nationalism, Democracy and Conflict in Central Europe: the Czech case
The use of a nationalist vocabulary in the political debate in countries of Central Europe shows that the issue of nationalism and national identity is not something of the past. Instead, it is very present in the public discourse about society and politics. The dominant idea in these countries is that the ethnic or national group is the most determining factor for one's identity.

This course examines Czech nationalist concepts, a broader perspective of history, of the diversity of concepts of national identity, of influences of personalities, movements or ideologies. In the course we read and discuss texts which give valuable background information and disclose mentalities behind the developments.
Essential questions to understand the Czech discourse on national identity and nationalism are:

  • How was and is national identity defined in the Czech case?
  • What is the relation of Czechs to other ethnic groups living in Central Europe?
  • What are the national myths, legends and heroes?
  • How violent was and is Czech nationalism?
  • What was the effect of communism on national identity?
  • What was the role of religion in this process?
  • What is the relation of the Czechs to the European Union?

PSYC 3001 PRAG/POLI 3001 PRAG

Psychology of Transition and Transformation
The psychology of transition and transformation (political psychology in the Czech Republic) is studied with emphasis on the recent transition from totalitarianism to democracy. Topics include: political socialization, moral development and dilemmas, coping and ego defense mechanisms, immigration and cross-cultural adaptation, traumatic influence of the totalitarian past on the Czech society, post-totalitarian syndrome, and psychological problems of transformation.

PSYC 3005 PRAG

Psychoanalysis and Society
This course seeks to explore the relation between psyche and society through an analysis of crucial contemporary and historical issues in Central and Eastern Europe, with a focus on the Czech Republic. Topics such as racism, sexuality, ecology, history, and politics are studied from a variety psychodynamic perspectives, juxtaposing the stark reality of the region's history and culture with various psychoanalytic tools for understanding. The overarching theme of how mind and society co-evolve remains as a thread running through the course.

PSYC 3004 PRAG

Psychoanalysis and Art
What is Art? What emotions or sensations do you feel when you create? What is the relationship between art, dreams, mourning, phantasy, symbolization, subjectivity, identity, sexuality and the unconscious? This course seeks to introduce the area of overlap between psychoanalysis and art, including the mutual influences, borrowings, and inspirations between these two supposedly separate domains. It includes a look at the psychodynamics of the creative process and what motivates us to do art. It looks at the aesthetic experience, how psychoanalysis can help us understand the powerful phenomenon of being confronted with a work of art, art taken in its broadest sense. This leads us to study developments in psychoanalytic aesthetics, explored with various examples from painting, literature and film. The course also looks at the therapeutic aspect of art and at the contemporary clinical practice of art therapy, including experiential art therapy workshops.

PSYC 3005 PRAG

Psychoanalysis and Society
What is psychoanalysis? What is the relation between psyche and society? This course seeks to understand crucial contemporary and historical issues in Central and Eastern Europe, mainly focusing on the Czech Republic, such as racism, sexuality and politics from the perspective of a socially informed depth psychology. The social is needed to contextualize the psyche but equally any explanation which leaves out a deep nuanced study of human subjectivity will be impoverished and unable to account for the richness of the reality investigated. The course explores this terrain from a multiplicity of psychodynamic perspectives, juxtaposing the stark reality of the regions, history and culture with various psychoanalytic tools for understanding. Competing intellectual traditions are not decided for and against but are seen as mutually enriching. Each individual is encouraged to take a stand on the issues involved and develop their own unique perspective.

PSYC 3006 PRAG

The Third Force Psychology in a Central European Context
Environmental and biological naturalism have been the most prominent philosophy of science in the last hundred years. According to naturalism, human behavior and experience should be studied just like any other phenomena in the nature (e.g. living cell, chemical molecules or physical forces). Contrary to this belief, humanistic and existential psychologists insist that the study of human beings needs to be approached in a different way. The fact that human beings are largely aware of themselves and of their living situations make them a unique subject of study. In this course we will look at the necessary philosophical and psychological concepts and theories, such as limit situations, but we will connect them with real stories of people who lived in the Central European context in last 60 years. It will be our effort to understand the psychology of dissent and opposition towards totalitarian forces within society and individuals.

PSYC 3007 PRAG

Cultural Psychology: Czech and American Perspectives
Psychology is a science about the human mind, mental process (phenomena) and individual or group behavior. Cultural psychology focuses on the interaction of mind, human behavior and culture. Humans come to this world ill prepared and their survival to a large extent, at any point of their life, depends on other individuals, groups and societies. These smaller or larger groups of people can survive together only with the help of their cultures. We can say that as humans we are formed by our culture and at the same time we form our own culture. The concept of culture belongs to the fields of anthropology and sociology as well as psychology. What contribution does psychology bring? The basic question to examine here is: Are people in all cultures essentially the same or are they fundamentally different? If they are essentially the same, what are the universal characteristics of all people of all times? If there are substantial differences between people from different cultural backgrounds, what are these differences? Cultural psychology focuses on individuals and their functioning within culture.

RELI 3002 PRAG

History of the Jews in Bohemia and Central Europe
This course examines the Jewish experience in the Czech lands and the other countries of Central Europe. It touches upon the history of Jews in Russia, in addition to Central Europe, since Russia shares some commonalities with the history of Jews in Poland and the Czech Lands. The course will be of interest to History and/or Jewish or Religious studies students, as well as those who want to learn about the history of the Jewish people in the heart of Europe. It is of interest to US students in particular, as one of the largest Jewish communities worldwide lives in the United States and most North American Jews are of Central or Eastern European decent.

RELI 3003 PRAG

Introduction to the Kabbalah and Jewish Mysticism
The Kabbalah for many people in the U.S. may make them think of Madonna or Britney Spears. This, however, is a distorted image of the Kabbalah. Jewish Mysticism, or the Kabbalah, which means the literary tradition, is one of the oldest branches of Judaism. Prague is a special place to study the Kabbalah. Here, in the center of Europe, the Kabbalists from Germany, Italy, and Spain had an enormous influence on Czech Judaism. According to a Talmudic dictum, there are four levels of explaining the Scripture: peshat, the direct meaning; remez, the allegorical meaning; drash, the inquiry into Scripture; and finally, sod, the secret meaning. During this course the student will be led through the history of the Kabbalah and will gain knowledge about the major trends in Jewish mysticism.

PSYC 3006 PRAG

The Third Force Psychology in a Central European Context
Environmental and biological naturalism have been the most prominent philosophy of science in the last hundred years. According to naturalism, human behavior and experience should be studied just like any other phenomena in the nature (e.g. living cell, chemical molecules or physical forces). Contrary to this belief, humanistic and existential psychologists insist that the study of human beings needs to be approached in a different way. The fact that human beings are largely aware of themselves and of their living situations make them a unique subject of study. In this course we will look at the necessary philosophical and psychological concepts and theories, such as limit situations, but we will connect them with real stories of people who lived in the Central European context in last 60 years. It will be our effort to understand the psychology of dissent and opposition towards totalitarian forces within society and individuals.

SOCI 3001 PRAG

Civic Engagement & Social Issues: Central Europe Perspective
The aim of the course is to describe and further elaborate on the actual social problems in the Czech Republic. We will discuss the current development of the selected social problems and examine the different approaches how to solve them. Furthermore, we will assess the impact of the current social problems on the Czech society and compare them with other countries. Important part of this course will include the discussion of personal experience of the students. We will reflect specifics of different cultural and historical context.

The cross-cutting topic of the course is to understand people's engagement in the social issues, primarily through their participation in non-governmental organizations and community initiatives. We will engage in the ongoing debates and follow the respective recent development as closely as possible in our classes using variety of sources, including academic articles, videos, reports by various institutions and media coverage of the issues.

SOCI 3002 PRAG / ANTH 3004 PRAG

Migration and Mobility in Central and Eastern Europe
The aim of the course is to develop students' knowledge of contemporary migration and immigration policy trends in Central Europe and Eastern Europe. The course will combine knowledge of the general theoretical and empirical development of migration studies with more specific analyses of concrete cases in Central and Eastern Europe. The purpose is to perceive the multidimensional and dynamic character of migration from the perspective of social anthropology. We will pay special attention to gender consequences of migration, family migration, the impact of migration policies, and critical studies of citizenship and belonging.

FAMU Cinema Studies Courses

Participants with an interest in cinema and performing arts may take up to 6 semester credits (up to 2 courses of 3 semester credits or 4 courses of 1.5 semester credits) from among those offered to international students by FAMU. A final list of FAMU courses is available at the time of enrollment. Some FAMU courses have prerequisites. Following is a representative sample of FAMU courses that have been available in past terms.

DE FAMU-ACTTHE1+2

Acting Theories 1, 2
This course aims to cover essentials of acting theories-some historical, but mostly contemporary-in order to help film directors communicate effectively with actors from varying pedagogical and cultural backgrounds.

DE FAMU-ANIMA

History of Animation
This course at FAMU is an introduction into the history of animation - the rich Czech and foreign panorama of Animated Films. Students will become acquainted with the history of animation from the early years of film, as well as with differences between American and European animation. Students will also experience the work of individual Masters of animation from different national perspectives on cinematography through the 20th Century. The aim is to understand the roots of this special art and the serious historical impact it had in different parts of the world.

DE FAMU-CECCEC

Central European Cinema within the Context of the World Cinema
This course will focus on films from four of the largest cultural groups in the Visegrad region Central Europe (Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, and Polish) with the goal of examining how this region's history has impacted its culture by looking at the four regions' responses to identity, war, and domestic social problems. Throughout the semester, this course will teach students how to approach the cultural and historical elements which are the backbone of every film, while also applying film and cultural theory to a variety of visual media. Students will also gain a deeper appreciation of cultural history and how it relates to their own creative processes, with the aim of giving students tools useful in all aspects of the filmmaking process. Students will also learn how to present their ideas and analysis in a clear, concise, and above all, effective manner.

DE FAMU-CINFL

Cinematographer's Influence
This course gives an explanation of the cinematographer's craft in the fields of exponometry, processing, and other postproduction technologies. It analyzes the use of various exponometric (photometric) methods and their effectiveness on the aesthetic of cinematographic image. It is a lecture/seminar format and students are given theoretical and practical assignments.

DE FAMU-CIRC

Circulating within the Post-Modern Cinematic Image
This seminar offered in Spring semesters is a select examination of eight major films in pre-1950 Euro-American film with special emphasis given to those cinematic moments that might teach and train us in new viewing strategies, in new ways of circulating, and in new ways of engaging with the cinematic image. Film criticism and film philosophy from Bersani-Dutoit and Gilles Deleuze, inter alia, will be engaged toward this end. All films are either in English or have English inter-titles or sub-titles. Clips and special features from the DVDs will also be shown.

DE FAMU-CIRMODCIN

Circulating within the Modern Cinematic Image
This inter-disciplinary seminar offered in Fall semesters is modeled on the epistemological notion of a U.S.-American informed postmodernity/globalization, which for ill or for better informs the conditions of possibility of our contemporaneity, and which by extension for us as such produces our individual-class-mission that pedagogically focuses a select band of becoming authentically global films from the following 20th century world directors: Sergei Eisenstein, Carl Theodor Dreyer, D.W. Griffith, Buster Keaton, Fritz Lang, Friedrich Murnau, Dziga Vertov, and Orson Welles with special consideration given to those cinematic moments that teach and that train us in new non-dominator viewing strategies, in new creative ways of circulating (our term for moving). The role of silence and of the unconscious in film culture is given special coverage. Clips and special features from the DVDs are also shown.

DE FAMU-FILMADPT

Film Adaptations on Literary Sources
The literary sources and the films made after them are to be compared with the goal of identifying and studying different ways of adapting to the screen a literary source: "true" adaptations, "free" adaptations, using some ideas, symbols or metaphors from a novel or story for making a film etc. This could not only enrich the students' knowledge about the history of the world Literature and Cinema, but also help and inspire them for their future career as filmmakers. Special attention will be dedicated to short films adapting literary sources.

DE FAMU-FILMSTYFRM

Film, Form and Style
The course will focus on the film style and form (Fall: mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing; Spring: sound, narration) partly based on the readings of the book Film Art: An Introduction by David Bordwell and Kritstin Thompson. In course students and teachers will discuss the means of film style and form and how they present themselves in a dozen of great films from various epochs and countries. Disclosure of possible meanings and interpretation of them is the aim of the course.

DE FAMU-FLMUNFLM

Filming the Unfilmable
This course offered in Fall semesters is focused on exploring and developing the dramatic and creative writing techniques plus the critical thought required to enable screenwriters to adapt a range of source material into a format suitable for screen production. The student will develop a screenplay suitable for production and filming in the following semester. The first half of the course will focus on creative techniques and in-roads for developing style and content. The second half will focus on script production, subject choices and structure. Students are expected to view/read the range of material suggested plus bring awareness to the group of material from their own cultures and cinematic heritage.

DE FAMU-INTFILMPRO

Introduction to Intl Film/TV Production
This course focuses on the work and art of a film and television producer, the craft of the person who serves as a) highly skilled and organized project manager, b) counterpart and/ or partner to director and screenwriter, and on occasion, c) creative author of a project. The key areas of information for a producer (and this class) are marketing, financing, budgeting, legal, and business affairs in the stages of project development, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution.

DE FAMU-NATCTYCIN

Nature and City in the Cinema
The aim of the course is to discuss the setting of the various films - variety of the natural setting, garden, countryside and the city - and to explain how applying the studies from the various subjects (architecture, environmentalism, philosophy, etc.) might be helpful for understanding the role that the particular setting fulfills. Students will discuss the films from the different epochs and different regions and will examine the significance of city/country/nature that those films present.

DE FAMU-PHOTIMG

Photographic Imaging
The practice of still-photography and cinematography is becoming more a branch of applied science and less an empirical craft; therefore, it is increasingly necessary to base the practice on a thorough understanding of photographic materials and processes rather than on rule-of-thumb methods. In a sense, the craft has been simplified by advances in the production of more satisfactory new materials and equipment and the development of new and better methods, but the very diversity of these materials and the tremendously increased scope of modern photography and cinematography combine to demand a more thorough knowledge of fundamentals than was formerly necessary. Central to the course is how well students can apply the material presented in practice, tackle practical problems connected with measurement of light and set the correct exposure.

DE FAMU-RLM

The Realm of Montage
A film is expressed through emotion, not thought, an emotion is created in film editing. An editing sequence demonstrates not only the editor's art but reflects the director's thought,philosophy and ethics and particular film language. This will be discussed further through analyses of excerpts from known and lesser-known films. Classes are made up of example screenings, their analyses including a summary of necessary theory and history information, as well as from guided discussions. The aim is to inspire students' analytical thought over the creating of emotion and its significance in film as well as to enable them to test their observations in practice. Students at the last class screen two variations of one sequence (shot and edited as assigned), which demonstrates their understanding of assembly potential.

DE FAMU-SCRPTAN

Script Analysis 1, 2
This course analyzes feature length films from a practical dramaturgical perspective, demonstrating dramatic structures, narrative techniques, and genres, while examining the process and craft of screenwriting.

DE FAMU-SHFLPA

Short Film Practical Analysis: Directing
This course provides students with an in-depth perspective to many forms of directing: from directing newscasts to directing feature films. This course explores directing methods, the director's tools, and his/her relationship with the actors and crew from a variety of perspectives including practical, theoretical, psychological, and physiological points of view.

DE FAMU-VISTHEO1+2

Visual Theory 1, 2
This course explores how photographs are constructed, analyzing the use of various aesthetic and design elements and the effects of these on the viewer. The format is lecture/ seminar, and students are given practical as well as theoretical assignments. Slide and video presentations support the content of the lectures.

Acting Studio
This is a practical course for directors, producers, scriptwriters, cinematographers, or editors to understand the actor's craft. Students proceed from exercises and various improvisations to a given text, a dialogue, and a monologue. At the end of each semester the student performs a piece in front of the camera and assesses the work on video. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester / 2.25 quarter hours.

Subversive Subjections
The course explores notions of individual and colletive identity, subjectivity and the self in the context of modern Czech literature. Following (and possibly contradicting) various aspects of the argument of 'minor literature' (Deleuze - Guattari), students will discuss the writing of Kafka, Hašek, Škvorecký, Kundera or Hrabal as conflictual sites of identity and difference, solidifying discoursive structures and invisible lines of flight and subversion, transcendence and immanence.

Chapters from Film History and Criticism
This course presents the most important trends, moments, and personalities in European film history. Both film style and production modes are analyzed. Students watch films in their entirety or short examples illustrating particular topics. Recommended credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

Documentary: Connection
This course is focused on exploring documentary cinema within its broad range of artistic and rhetorical methods toward representing reality - from both a theoretical and empirical standpoint. At its foundation, the course will consider the theoretical approaches of Nichols, Bruzzi and Gauthier within the context of theories of representation (mostly Jost).

Introduction to The Soundtrack 1
The first part of the course focuses on the fundamentals of using sound to furnish meaning, whether for narrative, documentary, or abstract works. We follow the thread of production through the various elements that comprise a soundtrack, based on our real time limitations and available tools. Basic precepts, tips, and tricks: from conception to sound capture to edit to mix to output via the building blocks of the soundtrack including dialogue, narration, music, foley, ambient sound, and most importantly sound effect/sound design. Readings, bibliography, URLs, DVD examples, hardware, and software are provided. We work in the Final Cut and Soundtrack programs. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester / 2.25 quarter hours.

Introduction to The Soundtrack 2
The second part of the course on the soundtrack focuses on viewing/listening to primarily narrative feature films and analyzing their various approaches to making the soundspace. We also read theoretical texts on the soundtrack and film music and see how today's technology has made much of older existing theory somewhat redundant. In many classes we watch a single film, stopping and starting it and using it as a basis for both technical and aesthetic discussions: "How did they do this and why?" Recommended credit: 1.5 semester / 2.25 quarter hours.

Practical Analysis: Directing
This course shows students the way that experienced directors handle some of the most common film situations, such as introduction of the main character, first and last shot in the film, chasing scene, four persons talking around the table, a man getting out of the car, etc. Recommended credit: 1.5 semester / 2.25 quarter hours.

Producer's Craft
This course focuses on the work and art of a film and television producer, the craft of the person who serves as a) highly skilled and organized project manager, b) counterpart and/ or partner to director and screenwriter, and on occasion, c) creative author of a project. The key areas of information for a producer (and this class) are marketing, financing, budgeting, legal, and business affairs in the stages of project development, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution.

Topics in Avant-Garde Cinema
This course portrays the evolution of avant-garde film during the 20th century: different strains in avant-garde film movement (i.e. cinéma pur, non-objective film, surrealist film, formal film, structural/material film, found-footage film, assemblage and collage film, etc.) with the aim to illustrate possibilities of the film language (filmic devices, film technique, methods of montage, or animations, etc.) of non-narrative cinema. Every lesson is accompanied by many examples, screened on VHS. Recommended credit: 3 semester / 4.5 quarter hours.

FAMU Weekend Modules
These intensive courses are led by visiting film specialists (directors, screenwriters, producers, cinematographers, etc.). New modules are organized each semester. Current offerings are made available upon arrival in Prague. Examples of previously offered modules include: Cinema Dance Workshop; The Transmutation of Light: Alchemy and Cinema; and Marcus Bergner: What Would Happen If...? Investigating New Possibilities for Narrative Film.

Charles University Area Studies Courses

Students have limited access to a select group of elective courses at Charles University. Participation in each course is limited to a few CIEE students. CIEE students may take a maximum of six semester credits outside of CIEE courses. Classes are taught at Charles University and allow CIEE students to study alongside other international students. The following list is a sample of courses that may be available to CIEE students. A final list of available courses is distributed during orientation.

CUFA ART 310

Sociocultural Development of the Soviet Russia
The course deals with social and cultural history of the Soviet Union from revolution in 1917 until disintegration in 1991. It analyses not only changing social conditions of Soviet citizens but also the role of culture in formation of the new homo Sovieticus. The cultural development of the Soviet society will be examined in various aspects of "high" and "low" culture; special attention will be paid to the role of architecture, art, cinematography, theatre, music etc. The course will concentrate also on important changes in society, primarily in such areas as religion, education, gender, ideology and so on. It contains two parts: lecture (2x45 minutes per week) and seminar (2x45 minutes per week). Lectures will offer key information to the topic while seminars will develop acquired knowledge through discussions, examples, presentations, projections etc.

CUFA ART 321

Art Photography and Genius Loci
A one-semester experimental course that will combine some theoretical aspects of photography and its aesthetic and cognitive value as a unique art form, with practical exercises and authentic experiential outdoor activities. Not primarily conceived as a course in the history of Czech Photography, the course will still provide a basic orientation in the Czech(oslovak) photographic art of the 20th century. The focus is not so much on the technique, but rather on the styles and how photography as an exquisite artistic medium expresses (or at times suppresses) the individual bias, aesthetics, period style, and the societal and cultural boundaries. The course will also marginally examine the age-old debate about the documentary value versus the artistic value of photography, and similarly the argument on the nude photography versus pornography.

CUFA ART 351

Twentieth Century Prague Literature in International Context
The course aims to cover selected chapters of 20th-century Czech literature as part of the Central- and East-European and Anglo-American contexts, presenting Prague and the literature produced here at the crossroads of multiple languages, traditions, poetic and aesthetic systems.

The canonical Czech-writing authors include, among others, Jaroslav Hašek, Karel Čapek, the poetist poets (Nezval, Seifert, Biebl), Milan Kundera, Josef Škvorecký, Ivan Blatný, or Václav Havel.

The international context is provided by German-writing authors such as Gustav Meyrink, Franz Kafka, or Robert Musil, by the Russian writers Vladimir Mayakovsky, Mikhail Bulgakov & Marina Tsvetayeva, as well as the many French and Anglophone poets writing in/about Prague.

The seminar will conclude with an overview of the post-1989 situation, where Prague literature has once again become the locus of lively international exchange and prominent Czech or Prague-based writers (Jáchym Topol, Michal Ajvaz, Lukáš Tomin, Louis Armand) have re-entered into dialogue with other traditions and languages.

Discussion of the literary texts is complemented by their historical/theoretical backgrounds, provided by the work of Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari, Martin Esslin, Sigmund Freud, Angelo Maria Ripellino, et al.

CUFA ECON 303

Transition Process of the Czech Republic and European Union
Recent Economic Development in Europe has been markedly influenced by two major factors: by the process of European Integration and by the Transition Process in Central and Eastern Europe. However the European Union tries to integrate European Economies into a single market, economic systems of European countries markedly differ. The economic systems comparison is thus another aim of the course.

The course comprises of three blocks:

  1. Transformation process: basic features of CPE, pillars of transformation, basic steps of transformation, outcomes of the transformation process
  2. European integration: history, institutions, policies, enlargement
  3. Recent economic development of the European countries: economic development, indicators of economic policies, coping with the financial crisis, outlook

CUFA ECON 305

Global Economy and Crises
This course combines application of International Economics and International Political Economy to the processes of globalization and current economic downturn. It explores different ways in which current globalization changes the position of different actors of the Global Economic System as well as the balance between state and market and their interactions. The course focuses on analysis of historical and contemporary issues in the Global Economic Order both in theoretical and applied perspective. Important part of the course focuses on comparative perspectives both in the form of Comparison of Economic Systems and of comparison of past major world economic crises.

CUFA FILM 365

Surrealism and Eastern and Central European Cinema
What is the relationship between surrealism and cinema? How has this relationship changed since the surrealist movement first emerged in the early 1920s? And what makes a particular film or film maker surrealist? These are some of the key questions explored in Surrealism and Eastern and Central European Cinema, a course that aims to chart the history of surrealist film making, with a focus on surrealist films produced in Eastern and central Europe from the mid-1960s to the present day. Students will develop an in-depth understanding of key concepts related to surrealism, which they will use to analyze and evaluate a variety of surrealist films, such as Juraj Herz's The Cremator (1969), Andrei Tarkovsky's The Mirror (1975), Jan Švankmajer's Alice (1988), and Béla Tarr's Werckmeister Harmonies (2000). In addition, they will also examine the influence of central and Eastern European surrealist films on filmmakers from outside the region, such as David Lynch (Blue Velvet [1986]) and the Quay brothers (Institute Benjumenta [1995]).

CUFA FILM 368

Czech and Slovak Cinema from the 1950's to Present: Politics, Visuality, and Experimentation
Bounded by the Germanic Empires to the West, the Russian Empire and Soviet Union to the East, Hungary and the former Ottoman holdings to the South, the Czech and Slovak lands have long been a site of conflict and creation. This course will explore the incredibly rich cinematic tradition of thought provoking and entertaining films produced in the areas of the Czech Republic (the primary area of focus), and Slovakia from the years following World War II up until the beginning of the 21st century. In addition to watching films, we will also be discussing cinema theory and approaches to "reading" films, not only as movies, but also as multi-faceted cultural artifacts. To this end, our readings will contain primary source materials on cinema history, historical research, film theory, and literature intended to broaden our understanding of Czech and Slovak culture, cinematic and otherwise.

While this syllabus gives a fairly accurate portrayal of the material we will cover, additional material may be assigned (and assigned material may be dropped or altered) at any time as the semester progresses, in order to better suit the needs and interests of the class.

CUFA HIST 311

Prague, Story of a Central European City
Across national boundaries, Central European cities share many aspects of their past and present. Due to its geopolitical location, Prague was the starting point of many European historical events. The course will take the city of Prague as a base for understanding broader issues in Central European history and politics, such as the rise of nationalism, construction of empires, urbanization and modernization. The defenestration of 1618 (throwing two Habsburg officials out of the Prague Castle window), to give just one example, led to the pan-European Thirty Years War.

Each class discussion will be accompanied by a related field-trip that will give the students a first-hand experience. The students will visit both tourist magnets, such as the Old Jewish Cemetery, but also sites that are not accessible to the public, such as the derelict Communist Strahov Stadium. The course will also include two full-day mandatory field trips to Prague neighborhood.

CUFA HIST 312

The Peoples of Europe: Their Origins, Histories, Contacts
The course focuses on the processes and events that have been making the ethnical and political borders of Europe since the arrival of Indo-Europeans until present times. It follows the formations, expansions and differentiations of the Celtic, Germanic, Romance, Slavic and other peoples, the formation of medieval nations or changes in the political map of Europe in the last centuries. It also explains how and when peoples like Basques, Albanians, Hungarians, and Turks appeared in Europe. Due to its comprehensive character, the course is suitable for students interested in history, politics, geography, ethnology or linguistics.

CUFA HIST/POL/ART303

Czech Culture and Civilization Course: A Field Trip into Czech Psyche
This interdisciplinary course is designed as a unique insight into Czech/Slovak history, politics and arts and should provide the students with serious data and information as well as with "lighter" reflection on certain specifics of the development of the country in the heart of Europe. Students will not be limited to listening to lectures and attending screenings in classrooms only, they should understand that Prague and other locations in the Czech Republic will give them a rare opportunity to study and form their own opinion in public spaces all over the country. Learning through interactive seminars, visual arts, top-quality documentaries and visiting various artists' studios will enable the participants to gain an interesting experience on all levels. The course is structured into thirteen weekly sessions, 180 minutes each. Students will write four short mini-essays after each of the larger blocks as per the detailed syllabus bellow, and a final test.

CUFA LIT 326

American and Czech Literature from European Perspectives: Identity and Role Play
The term "identity" is essential for any exploration of society, the self and its various roles in literature and culture. However, it is difficult to pin down exactly what we mean by "identity." As a way of tackling this tricky problem, we will question various conceptions of identity in connection with the selected literary examples. We will examine the way in which identity is construed in the 20th and 21st century. Is identity only a performance or role play? Or is there an authentic, inner core to which we can refer? How do we approach the other? In the course, we will read and compare American and Czech authors from Melville to Kundera. European obsession with construction, existence and structuring will be contrasted with the American focus on transformation, movement and change. Among the specific topics that will be covered are: formations of identity, power, confidence, racial and gender stereotypes, "minority" vs. "mainstream" literature in Czech and American societies.

CUFA LIT 346

Great European Writers: The Life and Work of Karel Čapek
Karel Čapek (1890-1938), one of the great European writers of the last century and arguably the best Czech writer of all time, was a distinguished novelist, playwright and journalist in pre-war Czechoslovakia. Famed for giving the word 'robot' to the world (used in his play RUR), Čapek was a vital part of the burgeoning artistic scene of the 1920s and 30s. An unfaltering advocate of humanism and democracy, he warned against nationalism and communism as early as the 1920s, and campaigned against fascism, which precipitated his death in 1938. He was a phenomenal journalist whose views are particularly relevant to our time and Europe. It was in his witty, highly enjoyable columns and essays that he communicated his essential ideas. This course serves as an introduction to his varied oeuvre while offering scope for close analysis of some of his works. It also shows how his journalism is indivisible from his other writings. Students will learn not only about Karel Čapek and his brother and co-writer Josef, who became a celebrated artist, but also about the cultural and political contexts of Czech and European history leading up to the Second World War.

CUFA POL 315

Comparative Politics: Transformation of Czechoslovakia and the Czech Republic
Sharing the same geopolitical position within the East Bloc, the individual cases - i.e. Czechoslovakia, Poland, Hungary and others - differed significantly, however, in their respective points of departure, as well as in political institutional solutions chosen in course of their transitions. This comparative aspect will be studied with special focus. Students will be also encouraged to challenge the mainstream understanding of "transition" as a predictable, gradual and irreversible progress towards the standard "Western" model. The course is designed as a seminar based on a guided discussion about carefully selected texts collected in a reader; active participation of the students is essential.

CUFA POL 337

Czechoslovakian Dissent under Communist Rule: Political Thinking from the 1950's-1990's
The aim of this course is to give an overview about relevant figures, events and texts of the independent political thinking in the communist Czechoslovakia, based on reading and discussing original articles and documents (in English translations). This will include political debates during the Prague Spring, the dissident movement and its political thinking in 70's and 80's, as well as a few representative articles from the early 90's.

There are two main elements, reducing this wide topic into a reasonable range. One of them is Václav Havel, an extraordinarily instructive (not just attractive) figure within the Czech(oslovakian) politics of last four decades. Secondly, we will deal repeatedly with certain basic political concepts which seem to be clear at the first sight, but which cover up essentially different aspects when used by various authors (such as "socialism", "democracy", "politics" and others). Thus, we will apply an interdisciplinary approach, which combines the analysis of political ideologies, historical context and of the language/rhetoric within public debates.

CUFA POL 339

Political Philosophy of Central European Dissidence
The main topic of the seminar will be political thought of dissidence and "unofficial" thinkers in Central European countries (Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia) during the seventies and eighties of 20th century. We will read and discuss texts written by Václav Havel, György Konrád, Adam Michnik and others. Since several of our primary texts are written in essayistic form far from strict academic standards, I will present them within the theoretical background of western political philosophy. Therefore we will analyze the differences between committed political writings (mostly) from behind of the Iron curtain on the one hand and parallel way of thoughts in the academic political philosophy of the West on the other hand.

We will discuss and analyze problems like moral responsibility, moral demands of resistance against authoritarian regimes, lie and nature of ideology. Since many authors criticize not only communist authoritarian state but "politics as such" (e.g. Havel or Konrád), we will try to find out whether these authors offer some kind of alternative to the usual conception of politics and liberal democracy.

CUFA PSY 321

Language, Culture, and Social Cognition
The course introduces students to selected topics centered on the relationship among social cognition (i.e., folk psychology, theory of mind), language and culture. In spite of its cross-disciplinary scope, its chief focus is on questions of human development. It is designed both for students in arts and the sciences and will be run as a combination of lectures and seminars. The lectures will be closely tied to the readings but will often go beyond them. The seminars offer an opportunity to discuss the readings in detail and to raise questions arising from both the readings and lectures.

CUFA PSY 355

Selected Topics in Social Psychology: Soft Skills
Soft skills have got a great impact on our success and satisfaction in life. The concept of soft skills consists of both intra-personal and inter-personal aspects. This course presents a well-balanced practical overview of the soft skills world.
The content will be adapted according to the students, possible topics are:

  • Social perception, stereotyping, prejudices.
  • Effective communication principles.
  • Coaching.
  • Self-management.
  • Presentation skills.
  • Assertiveness and manipulation recognition.
  • Resolving conflicts.
  • Teamwork, group problem solving.
  • Stress management.
  • Authenticity, values.
  • Creativity.

Self-experience is one of the most important outcomes of this seminar and therefore active learning methods will be used in every session (discussion, role-play, simulations, exercises, art, reflective journal, peer counselling, etc.). The whole class is more practice-oriented than theory oriented.

CUFA SOC 353

Landscape and Sociology: Understanding of Czech and European Landscapes
The connections between society and the landscape go beyond descriptive sociological perspectives of biophysical landscapes. Holistically, landscape sociology incorporates philosophical, cultural, anthropological and ecological interactions between man and nature, and between social and ecological systems. European, and particularly Czech, landscapes represent ecological as well as sociocultural heritages. Human experiences with landscapes, social and cultural constructions and transformations of landscapes, and the ways in which we bring meaning to landscapes are the main topics of this course.

A primary aim of landscape sociology is to show landscape both as a geo-ecological phenomenon and as a sociocultural construction. The development of basic knowledge of ecological and cultural constructions of the Czech and European landscapes thus requires us to discuss a range of topics, including contemporary environmental and ecological issues, globalization and the landscape, and orientations in pan-European landscape typology based on the integration of landscape formation actors as a regionally differentiated geography, morphology and scenery on the one hand and regional culture, habits and history on the other.

Landscape Sociology usually focuses on the interaction of social groups (represented largely by rural communities and urban environmentalists) and the complex of the environment constructed as the "landscape" on the macro-level. In this course, an overall objective and context for our lectures is the movement away from productivity as the sole or dominant mode of conceiving the value of rural landscapes, and the movement towards ideas about how to achieve economic, social and environmental sustainability.

CUFA SOC 354

Social Changes After 1989- Department
The aim of the course is to overview the last two decades of social change in the Czech Republic. After a short introduction to the historical and social development (1918-1989) and basic comparison to other CEE countries, the course focuses on basic perspectives on social change ("shock therapy vs. gradualism") and then deals with the changes in economic and social structure and political attitudes in general. To provide a deeper insight into the development, the transformation of housing and higher education system is presented in detail. The seminars consist of discussing short texts or relevant topics (covered in lectures), watching documentaries and presentations of students. Depending on the availability, relevant cultural events (i.e. exhibitions) are included as well.

CUFA LIT 310

Twentieth Century Prague Literature in an International Context
The course aims to cover selected chapters of 20th-century Czech literature as part of the Central- and East-European and Anglo-American contexts, presenting Prague and the literature produced here at the crossroads of multiple languages, traditions, poetic and aesthetic systems. The canonical Czech-writing authors include, among others, Jaroslav Hašek, Karel Čapek, the poetist poets (Nezval, Seifert, Biebl), Milan Kundera, Josef Škvorecký, Ivan Blatný, or Václav Havel.

The international context is provided by German-writing authors such as Gustav Meyrink, Franz Kafka, or Robert Musil, by the Russian writers Vladimir Mayakovsky, Mikhail Bulgakov & Marina Tsvetayeva, as well as the many French and Anglophone poets writing in/about Prague.

The seminar will conclude with an overview of the post-1989 situation, where Prague literature has once again become the locus of lively international exchange and prominent Czech or Prague-based writers (Jáchym Topol, Michal Ajvaz, Lukáš Tomin, Louis Armand) have re-entered into dialogue with other traditions and languages. Discussion of the literary texts is complemented by their historical/theoretical backgrounds, provided by the work of Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari, Martin Esslin, Sigmund Freud, Angelo Maria Ripellino, et al.

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