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Quick Info

Quick Info

By Term

  • Summer 2014
  • Summer 2015
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Dates:
06/22/2014 - 08/17/2014
Deadlines:
Extended to: 04/15/2014
Credit:
9 semester / 13.5 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
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Dates:
06/22/2015 - 08/17/2015
Deadlines:
04/01/2015
Credit:
9 semester / 13.5 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
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Study Abroad in Shanghai
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Program Overview

Program Overview

Commercial giant; financial and cultural hub; the largest container port on Earth—there may be no better city to examine the rapidly changing nature of global business than Shanghai.

Whether you have no background in Chinese, or you’ve studied the language for several semesters, this study abroad program provides students with vital insight into the causes behind—and challenges of—China’s rapid economic development and the country’s emerging role on the world stage.

With study abroad in China, you’ll spend the summer engaged in a unique combination of in-depth coursework, networking opportunities, cultural activities, and excursions. Study abroad in Shanghai and you will:

  • Study Mandarin Chinese at all levels with support from peer language tutors and language clinic instructors; or choose not to study a language and focus entirely on area studies coursework
  • Learn outside the classroom through volunteer opportunities, cultural activities, and a three-day fieldtrip with excursions to Chinese companies and factories
  • Live with a Chinese host family or on-campus with a Chinese roommate

An understanding of both Asian markets and culture is a tremendous asset for any future business professional. Take a closer look into the factors driving and issues facing China with CIEE Shanghai.

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The CIEE Difference

The CIEE Difference

Coursework

Investigate the most pressing business issues and trends with some of China’s most respected professors. Examine the changing nature of business in China with former CFO for Nike China, Charles Mo, and compare policy making institutions in China and the U.S. with Ken Nealy, J.D..

You can also choose to study Mandarin with courses accommodating all levels from beginner to superior.

study abroad in China
  • Global business advisory firm FTI International Risk
  • Intelligence platform for global business, Panjiva
  • Non-profit, Active Kidz Shanghai
  • Import and export company, E Heng

Cultural Activities

Weekly visits to local markets, museums, temples, and other sites in Shanghai compliment classroom work. Other group cultural activities include an acrobatic show and dumpling making with host families. A number of optional, extracurricular classes are available at no additional cost, including: Chinese cooking, calligraphy, martial arts, music, and mahjong.

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Dates, Deadlines & Fees

Dates, Deadlines & Fees

We want to make sure you get the most out of your experience when you study abroad with CIEE, which is why we offer the most inclusions in our fees.

The study abroad program fee includes:

  • Tuition and housing
  • Pre-departure advising and optional on-site airport meet and greet
  • Full-time program leadership and support
  • Field trips and cultural activities
  • CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits
Please note, program dates are subject to change. Please contact your CIEE Study Abroad Advisor before purchasing airfare. Click the button to view more detailed information about dates and fees as well as estimated additional costs. Please talk with your University Study Abroad Advisor about additional fees that may be charged by your home institution when participating in a program abroad.
Program
Application Due
Start Date
End Date
Costs
Summer 2014 (8 wks)
Extended to: 04/15/2014
06/22/2014
08/17/2014
$6,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, field trips, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$5,335
Housing ***
$900
Insurance
$102
Visa Fees
$213

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** includes breakfast and dinner during the week and some weekend meals for students in homestays; no meals are included for students in the residence halls

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$800
International Airfare **
$1,700
Local Transportation
$150
Books & Supplies
$75
Personal expenses
$1,200

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in residence halls; students placed in homestays only need to budget $300 for meals not included in the program fee

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Summer 2015 (8 wks)
04/01/2015
06/22/2015
08/17/2015

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

Estimated Additional Costs

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

More Information
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Eligibility
2.75 Overall GPA

Eligibility

  • Overall GPA 2.75
  • There is no language prerequisite for this program
  • 1 semester of college-level coursework in Chinese studies recommended but not required
  • Students who are citizens of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan ROC, Hong Kong SAR, or Macau are welcome and should contact the CIEE Study Abroad Advisor about special entry requirements
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Recommended Credit

Recommended Credit

Total recommended credit for the summer is 9 semester/13.5 quarter hours.

Elective courses meet for 45 contact hours, with a recommended credit of 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours per course.

Language courses meet for 90 contact hours, with a recommended credit of 6 semester/9 quarter hours.

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Program Requirements

Program Requirements

A full course load is two to three courses. Students on this study abroad program may choose:

  • Three, three-credit elective courses taught in English or Chinese
  • One three-credit course taught in English or Chinese
  • One elective course taught in English or Chinese and one six-credit Chinese language course at the appropriate
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About the City

About The City

Shanghai is known for its long history of foreign influence, fashion, and economic prowess and aims to become a global financial and shipping hub by the year 2020. With a population of 23 million people, Shanghai has seen massive development over the last two decades, and the new financial district of Pudong is home to some of the tallest skyscrapers in the world. Shanghai’s urban centers are conveniently connected by elevated light rails, the world’s first commercial high-speed Maglev train, and the fastest-growing rapid transit systems in the world.

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Meet The Staff

Meet The Staff

Staff Image

Steve Chao

Center Director

Dr. Steve Chao is the Center Director of the CIEE Study Center in Shanghai. He earned his Doctor of Education from Saint Louis University, M.B.A. from Lindenwood University, and B.A. from Columbia College. Dr. Chao has extensive experience in the field of international education working as an adjunct faculty and program administrator since 1985. Before joining CIEE, he was Director of International Programs at Worcester State University in Massachusetts, where he led university international initiatives, study abroad, and international student services for six years. Prior to that he directed the International Affairs Center at Indiana State University and taught modern Chinese history. Born in Taiwan, he began his career in international education at Columbia College, where he was Director of International Programs for nine years. Dr. Chao has also taught courses on U.S. higher education as a Visiting Fellow at Tongji University in Shanghai and served as Chair of the Department of International Trade at Tainan University of Technology, a leading women’s higher education institution in Taiwan. He has served as a research advisor to the Shanghai Municipal Education Commission 211 Project and to the Ministry of Education in Taiwan on educational reform and curriculum. He has worked for CIEE since fall, 2010.

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Foreign students in Shanghai are amazed by the breathtaking and profound changes taking place as the city aims to become a global financial and shipping center by 2020. Already a powerhouse for international business, Shanghai will undoubtedly become a hub of the global economy in the 21st century. Students striving to become global citizens and seeking the opportunity to engage in the international business world after graduation deserve this once for a lifetime opportunity. Come join us to witness the dramatic transformation of China, now the second largest economy in the world.

—Steve Chao, Center Director

Staff Image

Ma Jia

Chinese Language Coordinator

Ms. Jia Ma holds an M.A. from the Department of Chinese Language and Literature at East China Normal University. Originally from Yangzhou, Jiangsu Province, she worked at Willamette University as a Language Assistant before joining CIEE in fall, 2011 as a Chinese Language Coordinator.

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Liao Jianling

Chinese Language Director

Dr. Jianling Liao is the Chinese Language Director in charge of all Chinese language courses at the CIEE Study Center in Shanghai. Originally from Jiangxi Province, Dr. Liao completed her Ph.D. in the area of Second Language Acquisition from the University of Iowa. While studying abroad in the U.S. at the University of Iowa, she received an M.A. in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language and an M.A. in Instructional Design and Technology. In addition, she holds a third M.A. in Chinese Linguistics from Wuhan University. Her research interests include computer-assisted language learning and language pedagogy in study abroad contexts. Prior to joining CIEE, Dr. Liao taught for five summers at the Middlebury College Summer Chinese School. Dr. Liao is the 2011 recipient of the Emma Marie Birkmaier Award for Doctoral Dissertation Research in Foreign Language Education bestowed by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) and The Modern Language Journal (MLJ) “to recognize an author of doctoral dissertation research in foreign language education that contributes significantly to the advancement of the profession.” She has worked for CIEE since summer, 2006.

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Xie Ping

Chinese Language Curriculum Manager

Ms. Ping Xie is the Chinese Language Curriculum Manager. Originally from Hubei Province, she holds an M.A. from East China Normal University in Teaching Chinese as a Second Language. She has taught for CIEE since summer, 2007.

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Where You'll Study

Where You'll Study

Established in 1951, East China Normal University (ECNU) is one of China’s key institutions of higher learning and the first to specialize in teacher education. ECNU is nationally known for its Chinese language and literature program, and the university enrolls more than 21,000 full-time undergraduate and post-graduate students on its two campuses, along with some 2,700 international students, mostly from Korea and Japan. The CIEE Study Center is located along the bank of the Liwa River on its downtown Putuo campus, known as the “Garden University” for its beautiful grounds.

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Housing & Meals

Housing & Meals

Participants select one of three housing options prior to arrival.

Campus Residence Hall with CIEE Roommate—
The Campus Residence Hall is a five-story facility located on the ECNU campus and has a lobby with 24-hour security and laundry facilities. There is a student computer room and study lounge on every other floor, as well as a kitchen and bathrooms on each floor. The residence hall is a 10-minute walk from the CIEE Study Center, and is within walking distance to a light rail and other public transportation.

Campus Residence Hall with Chinese Roommate—
This option is located in the same residence hall as described above, but study abroad students are paired with a Chinese student from ECNU. The Chinese roommates are required to speak only Chinese, so this option is recommended for students who wish to live in a more intensive Chinese language environment while remaining nearby other program participants.

Meals are not included in these two housing options and are the responsibility of the student. Meals are available in the campus cafeterias at a moderate price.

Chinese Host Families—
Chinese host families are located 15 - 45 minutes of campus, by foot or public transportation. Students have their own room in the host family apartment and share the living room, kitchen, and bathroom. Students are invited to most family meals, but should budget for their own lunches, some weekend meals, and most meals during group field trips and individual travel. Chinese family members speak Chinese only. This option is highly recommended for students who want to live in an entirely Chinese language environment and to make rapid progress in Chinese language.

The CIEE Shanghai staff strive to match each student based on his or her first preference, not only in terms of their personal lifestyle preferences but also academic, cultural and personal goals.

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Orientations

Orientations

You'll begin your study abroad experience in Shanghai even before leaving home by participating in a CIEE online pre-departure orientation. Meeting with students online, the resident director shares information about the program and site, highlighting issues that alumni have said are important, and giving you time to ask questions. The online orientation allows you to connect with others in the group, reflect on what you want to get out of the program, and learn what others in the group would like to accomplish. CIEE’s aim for the pre-departure orientation is simple—to help you understand more about the program, and identify your objectives so that you arrive well-informed and return home having made significant progress towards your goals.

A mandatory three-day orientation session conducted at the beginning of the program introduces you to the country, culture, and academic program, and provides practical information about living in Shanghai. You will also take language placement exams at this time to determine your appropriate Chinese language level, and meet individually with the center director and Chinese language director, as appropriate, to finalize course registration. Ongoing support is provided by CIEE staff on an individual and group basis throughout the program.

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Internet

Internet

study abroad in China

You are encouraged to bring a wireless-enabled laptop. Rooms in the campus residence hall are equipped with broadband ADSL wireless Internet access. Host family homes also have wireless or cable Internet access. The CIEE Study Center has wireless access and you will also be able to access the ECNU campus wireless network. A limited number of computers are available for use at no charge in the CIEE student library or at nearby Internet cafés for a low hourly fee.

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Academics

Academics

Academic Program

CIEE has been operating study abroad programs in Shanghai since 1981. Established in 1998, the CIEE Study Center in Shanghai has been hosted by East China Normal University since 2001. The Summer Business, Language, and Culture program began in 2009, and is designed to help participants gain a deeper understanding of China as it emerges to take a leading role in the global economy.

There is no language prerequisite for this program. The program is appropriate for students with a major or minor in economics, international business, business management, or marketing, and is open to all levels of language students, from novice students with no previous experience in the language to those with superior level Chinese language proficiency. This program includes non-intensive Mandarin Chinese language study or an alternative communicative Chinese language elective for beginners. Students who have completed one semester of college-level Chinese, or demonstrate equivalent proficiency in Chinese language have the option to take all their coursework in English. Students with at least four semesters of previous Chinese can also choose an entirely Chinese language curriculum by selecting an elective in Business Chinese.

Academic Culture

Study abroad students enrolled in Chinese language courses attend classes Monday through Thursday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., and on Fridays from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Friday's class includes two hours of language activities led by the instructor outside the classroom. The language classes are small, with an average of five students, so active participation is very important. Classes are typically co-taught by head language instructors who introduce new content, and assistant language instructors who focus on accuracy and consistency of pronunciation through daily drills and other exercises in smaller sections when necessary. In addition students enrolled in Chinese language courses meet with their peer tutors in structured tutorials for a minimum of one hour twice a week, with more tutorial hours available upon request.

Communicative Chinese and other elective courses in Chinese and English take place three times per week, typically Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday, for two hours each day. Course related fieldtrips are scheduled on Fridays and sometimes weekends.

The summer term is eight weeks long and includes a three-day orientation at the beginning of the program, and a three-day group field trip toward the middle of the term.

Nature of Classes

All courses are managed by CIEE and specially designed for CIEE study abroad students only.

Grading System

In the English language business electives, students are generally graded on the basis of mid-term and final papers, group presentations, case studies or market research, as well as class participation and attendance on field trips. In the language courses, assessment is based on daily homework and quizzes, written and oral unit tests each Friday, and written and oral mid-term and final exams. The following letter grades are assigned: A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, D, and F.

Language of Instruction

English
Mandarin Chinese

Faculty

All Chinese language courses are taught by the CIEE language director, full-time CIEE faculty, and graduate students from the East China Normal University College of International Chinese Studies. The Chinese language elective course is taught by full-time faculty from the College of International Chinese Studies, and the English language elective courses are taught by international faculty from the Stern School of Business, New York University in Shanghai, and from the private sector in Shanghai.

Learn more about the CIEE Greater China Initiative for Study Abroad at www.ciee.org/studychina.

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Course Description

Course Description

All Courses

Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be cancelled due to insufficient enrollment.

CIEE Study Center Syllabi

To view the most recent syllabi for courses taught by CIEE at our Study Centers, visit our syllabi site.

Language Courses

Students who elect to enroll in the Chinese language course are placed in one of the below levels based on results of on-site proficiency tests.

CHIN 1001 SHSU

Chinese–Beginning I
This course establishes a solid foundation in modern standard Mandarin Chinese language through the integration of all five skills: aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural understanding. Characters, vocabulary, and grammatical patterns are learned through communicative contexts. Textbook: Wu Zhongwei 吴中伟, ed. Dangdai Zhongwen: keben 1 当代中文•课本1 (Contemporary Chinese: textbook, vol. 1). Beijing: Sinolingua Press, 2003; Wu Zhongwei, ed. Dangdai Zhongwen: lianxi ce 1M 当代中文•练习册1 (Contemporary Chinese: exercise book, vol. 1). Beijing: Sinolingua Press, 2003; supplementary texts.

CHIN 1002 SHSU

Chinese–Beginning II
(Prerequisite: one semester of college-level Chinese language study)
This course continues to develop students’ Chinese language ability through the integration of all five skills: aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural understanding. Vocabulary and grammatical patterns are learned through communicative contexts. Textbook: Wu Zhongwei, ed. Dangdai Zhongwen: keben 2 (Contemporary Chinese: textbook, vol. 2). Beijing: Sinolingua Press, 2003; Wu Zhongwei, ed. Dangdai Zhongwen: lianxi ce 2 (Contemporary Chinese: exercise book, vol. 2). Beijing: Sinolingua Press, 2003; supplementary texts.

CHIN 1005 SHSU

Chinese—Beginning for Heritage Learners
This course provides heritage learners, who have some Chinese-speaking proficiency, the opportunity to hone their reading and writing skills through written assignments on contemporary Chinese topics. Students also continue to improve their Chinese-speaking skills through communicative contexts. This course requires enrollment of at least four heritage learners to open. Textbook: Wu Zhongwei, ed. Dangdai Zhongwen: keben 1-2 (Contemporary Chinese: textbook, vol. 1-2). Beijing: Sinolingua Press, 2003; Wu Zhongwei, ed. Dangdai Zhongwen: lianxi ce 1-2 (Contemporary Chinese: exercise book, vol. 1-2). Beijing: Sinolingua Press, 2003; supplementary texts.

CHIN 2001 SHSU

Chinese–Intermediate I
(Prerequisite: two semesters of college-level Chinese language study)
This course continues to develop students’ Chinese skills in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural understanding. Students’ linguistic knowledge is reinforced and expanded through class activities of increasing sophistication. Rigorous practice of spoken and written Chinese in communicative activities is conducted. Textbook: Liu Xun 刘珣, ed. Xin shiyong Hanyu keben: keben 3 新实用汉语课本•课本3 (New practical Chinese reader: textbook, vol. 3). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2012; Liu Xun, ed. Xin shiyong Hanyu keben: zonghe lianxi ce 3 新实用汉语课本•综合练习册3 (New practical Chinese reader: workbook, vol. 3). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2011; supplementary texts.

CHIN 2002 SHSU

Chinese–Intermediate II
(Prerequisite: three semesters of college-level Chinese language study)
This course continues to develop students’ Chinese abilities in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural understanding. Students’ linguistic knowledge is reinforced and expanded through class activities of increasing sophistication. Students are also required to comprehend and produce paragraph-level Chinese. Rigorous practice of spoken and written Chinese in complex communicative activities is conducted during class. Textbook: Liu Xun, ed. Xin shiyong Hanyu keben: keben 4 (New practical Chinese reader: textbook, vol. 4). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2004; Liu, Xun, ed. Xin shiyong Hanyu keben: zonghe lianxi ce 4 (New practical Chinese reader: workbook, vol. 4). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2004; supplementary texts.

CHIN 2005 SHSU

Chinese—Intermediate for Heritage Learners
This course provides heritage learners, who have intermediate level of Chinese-speaking proficiency, the opportunity to hone their reading and writing skills through written assignments on a wide variety of contemporary Chinese topics. Students also continue to expand their Chinese-speaking skills through complex communicative activities. This course requires the enrollment of at least four heritage learners to be held. Textbooks: Liu Xun, ed. Xin shiyong Hanyu keben: keben 3 (New practical Chinese reader: textbook, vol. 3). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2012; Liu Xun, ed. Xin shiyong Hanyu keben: zonghe lianxi ce 3 (New practical Chinese reader: workbook, vol. 3). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2003; Liu Xun, ed. Xin shiyong Hanyu keben: keben 4 (New practical Chinese reader: textbook, vol. 4). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2011; Liu, Xun, ed. Xin shiyong Hanyu keben: zonghe lianxi ce 4 (New practical Chinese reader: workbook, vol. 4). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2004; supplementary texts.

CHIN 3001 SHSU

Chinese–Advanced I
(Prerequisite: four semesters of college-level Chinese language study)
This course emphasizes understanding of formal writing, as compared to the spoken language students learned in their second year. Students are expected to discuss and write about serious topics, such as those related to contemporary social problems in China. Textbook: Zhuang Jiaying 庄稼婴and Zhang Zengzeng 张增增. Xin shijiao: gaoji Hanyu jiaocheng (shang, xia) 新视角:高级汉语教程(上、下). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2007; supplementary texts.

CHIN 3002 SHSU

Chinese–Advanced II
(Prerequisite: five semesters of college-level Chinese language study)
This course emphasizes the understanding of formal writing, as compared to the spoken language students learned in their second year. Students are expected to be able to discuss and write about serious topics, such as those related to contemporary social problems in China. Textbook: Wu Chengnian 吴成年. Du baozhi, xue Zhongwen: zhongji Hanyu baokan yuedu (xia ce) 读报纸,学中文:中级汉语报刊阅读(下册). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2004; supplementary texts.

CHIN 4001 SHSU

Chinese–Advanced High I
(Prerequisite: six semesters of college-level Chinese language study)
This course emphasizes developing skills for making speeches or writing essays on complex topics. Students at this level are expected to express themselves not only fluently and accurately, but also with sophistication. Textbook: Wu Chengnian. Du baozhi, xue Zhongwen: zhun gaoji Hanyu baokan yuedu (shang ce) 读报纸,学中文:准高级汉语报刊阅读(上册). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2006; supplementary texts.

CHIN 4002 SHSU

Chinese–Advanced High II
(Prerequisite: seven semesters of college-level Chinese language study)
The course enhances students’ skills of developing speeches or writing essays on complex topics. Students at this level are expected to express themselves not only fluently and accurately, but also with sophistication. Depending on enrollment, this course may be structured to the individual needs of students. Textbook: Wu Yamin 吴雅民. Dubao zhi Zhongguo: baokan yuedu jichu (xia) 读报知中国:报刊阅读基础(下) (Learning about China from newspapers: elementary newspaper reading, vol. 2). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2006; instructor developed materials.

CHIN 4901 SHSU

Chinese—Superior I
(Prerequisite: Chinese language proficiency of advanced high or above according to ACTFL Guidelines)
The course aims to train students’ abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills at the superior level. Students at this level are expected to apply Chinese in both formal and informal settings. Students are trained to develop discourse in Chinese with coherence and cohesiveness. Students are also expected to communicate with accuracy, fluency, and sophistication. Depending on enrollment, this course may be structured to the individual needs of students. Textbook: Instructor developed materials.

Electives—in English

BUSI 3001 SHSU

The Changing Nature of Business in China
This course emphasizes the various manners in which business is conducted in China today. Topics include joint ventures, state-owned industries, and private Chinese and foreign firms. Particular attention is paid to general working conditions, current foreign investment policies, and environmental regulations. Case studies are presented. The course also covers the practical elements of doing business in the People’s Republic of China, including important cultural concepts such as guanxi (connections) and mianzi (face). Classroom instruction is supplemented by site visits and guest lecturers. Instructor: Jack Marr, Advising Director, Stern School of Business, New York University in Shanghai

BUSI 3003 SHSU / MKTG 3001 SHSU

Marketing Management and Methods in East Asia and Emerging Markets
Marketing is a company-wide undertaking that drives an organization’s vision, mission, and strategic planning. Marking is about learning the overall shape of the market, deciding who the firm wants as its customers, which needs to satisfy, what products and services to create and offer, what prices to set, what communications to send and receive, what channels of distribution to use, and what partnerships to develop. Marketing deals with the whole process of entering markets, establishing sustainable and advantageous positions, and building loyal customer relationships. To achieve this, all departments must work together: designing the right products, furnishing the required funds and accounting for their use, buying the right inputs, and producing quality products. At the same time, the traditional marketing mix is being transformed across many industries by new information technologies, and as a result, some of the “traditional wisdom” is being turned on its head. We will look at cutting-edge theory in modern marketing management to be applied across a spectrum of industries and institutions—both business to consumer and business to business/institution, and see how this theory is applied through recent case studies both in China and abroad. We will have a particular focus on timely issues such as CRM (Customer Relationship Marketing), the impact of information technology on all areas of business and marketing, specific issues in China, Asia, and emerging Markets, the implications and opportunities created by the global economic crisis, and effectively integrating the marketing mission into the organization across all functions with their often conflicting perspectives. Instructor: Jack Marr, Advising Director, Stern School of Business, New York University in Shanghai

Electives—in Chinese

CHIN 1004 SHSU

Communicative Chinese
(This course is required for students with no previous Chinese language knowledge and who do not enroll in “Chinese—Beginning I.”)
This course is designed for beginning-level Chinese learners to develop practical oral communicative skills in Chinese. The course is function-oriented. A range of practical topics such as introducing oneself, discussing daily routines, how to make acquaintances, entertaining guests, shopping, negotiating price, asking for directions, seeing a doctor, etc. will be introduced in class. Class instruction emphasizes communication, interaction, performance, and group work. Interactive classroom activities such as role-plays, interviews, group discussions, and trips outside the classroom will be used to encourage students to use Chinese in meaningful contexts. Students will complete a number of speaking tasks, including regular oral assignments, in-class oral activities, oral exams, as well as occasional real-life speaking activities during fieldtrips outside the classroom. Beginning-level Chinese learners who intend to continue formal study of the language should enroll in “CHIN 1001 SHSU Chinese—Beginning I.” Textbook: Instructor developed materials.

CHIN 3011 SHSU

Business Chinese
(Prerequisite: four semesters of college-level Chinese language study, or heritage learners with consent of the instructor)
This course focuses on increasing students’ knowledge of modern Chinese business including its environment, traditions, and culture. The course aims to improve students’ ability to read business related articles, examine statistical information, and review business documents such as invoices, business contracts, and brochures introducing new products. Instructors teach students how to use their oral and written Chinese skills to express their opinions on business topics. Through the course, students become familiar with modern business related Chinese materials, improve their usage of Chinese in the actual work place, and enhance their ability to communicate using business vocabulary and terminology. Textbook: Yuan Fangyuan 袁芳远. Chenggongzhidao: zhongji shangwu Hanyu anli jiaocheng 成功之道:中级商务汉语案例教程 (Business Chinese for success: real cases from real companies). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2005. Instructor: Dr. Li Qingyu, Associate Professor, College of International Chinese Studies, East China Normal University

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