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Quick Info

Quick Info

By Term

  • Fall 2014
  • Spring 2014
  • Spring 2015
  • Academic year 2014-2015
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Dates:
08/31/2014 - 12/14/2014
Deadlines:
Extended to: 04/15/2014
Credit:
15 semester / 22.5 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
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Dates:
02/23/2014 - 06/08/2014
Deadlines:
11/01/2013
Credit:
15 semester / 22.5 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
TBA
Deadlines:
11/01/2014
Credit:
15 semester / 22.5 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
Dates:
08/31/2014 - TBA
Deadlines:
Extended to: 04/15/2014
Credit:
see credit information below
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

Map:
View Map
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Study Abroad in Shanghai
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Program Overview

Program Overview

Come apply and advance your Mandarin language skills in one of the most dynamic, rapidly developing cities on earth. Whether you’re a first- or fifth-year student of the language, you’ll have access to intensive, daily Chinese coursework and one-on-one classes that address your individual needs.

Coupling that classwork with structured peer tutorials and language clinics, cultural activities and volunteer opportunities, CIEE study abroad in Shanghai provides you with an exciting and truly immersive international experience.

Study abroad in Shanghai and you will:

  • Enroll in area studies courses related to business, international relations, political science, history, and other aspects of Chinese culture and society taught in English or Chinese
  • Learn outside the classroom through weekend and weeklong excursions “off the tourist track,” and practice Chinese in authentic situations
  • Live with a Chinese host family or on campus with a Chinese roommate
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The CIEE Difference

The CIEE Difference

Coursework

From beginner to superior, you’ll have access to a host of language learning and cultural studies courses that suit your particular interests and skill level. What’s more, you’ll choose from a variety of elective courses, taught in both English and Mandarin, ranging from business and finance to globalization, Chinese history, political science, and film studies. Qualified students may also be eligible for independent research opportunities or internships with local organizations

Cultural Activities

study abroad in China

A variety of field trips complement classroom work, including visits to local Chinese companies and factories, government agencies, museums, art exhibitions, and plays. Other group cultural activities include an acrobatics show, river cruise along the Bund, a Chinese and CIEE student talent show, international student sporting events, and group meals with Chinese roommates and families.

Excursions

Weekend and weeklong trips provide you an opportunity to learn about local culture and traditions in other regions of China. Visit the Forbidden City in Beijing or the Ming Mausoleum in Nanjing. Travel ancient trade routes, tour Hong Kong or Taipei, or spend a week working with a not-for-profit organization helping to improve conditions in an impoverished rural community.

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Dates, Deadlines & Fees

Dates, Deadlines & Fees

We want to make sure you get the most out of your experience when you study abroad with CIEE, which is why we offer the most inclusions in our fees.

The program fee includes:

  • Tuition and housing
  • Pre-departure advising and optional on-site airport meet and greet
  • Full-time program leadership and support
  • Field trips and cultural activities
  • CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits
Please note, program dates are subject to change. Please contact your CIEE Study Abroad Advisor before purchasing airfare. Click the button to view more detailed information about dates and fees as well as estimated additional costs. Please talk with your University Study Abroad Advisor about additional fees that may be charged by your home institution when participating in a program abroad.
Program
Application Due
Start Date
End Date
Costs
Fall 2014 (15 wks)
Extended to: 04/15/2014
08/31/2014
12/14/2014
$13,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, transportation and accommodation during the week-long academic field trip, peer language tutors, Chinese Language Clinic, guest lectures, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$11,485
Housing ***
$1,750
Insurance
$102
Visa Fees
$213

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** includes breakfast and dinner during the week and most weekends for homestay students

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,200
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation ***
$200
Books & Supplies ****
$50
Personal expenses
$2,100

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in residence halls; students placed in homestays should budget $550 for lunches

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

*** students enrolled in internships should budget $500

**** language books and area studies readers are free

More Information
Spring 2014 (15 wks)
11/01/2013
02/23/2014
06/08/2014
$13,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, transportation and accommodation during the week-long academic field trip, peer language tutors, Chinese Language Clinic, guest lectures, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$11,485
Housing ***
$1,750
Insurance
$102
Visa Fees
$213

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** includes breakfast and dinner during the week and most weekends for homestay students

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$1,200
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation ***
$200
Books & Supplies ****
$50
Personal expenses
$2,100

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in residence halls; students placed in homestays should budget $550 for lunches

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

*** students enrolled in internships should budget $500

**** language books and area studies readers are free

More Information
Spring 2015
11/01/2014
TBA
TBA

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

Estimated Additional Costs

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

More Information
Academic year 2014-2015
Extended to: 04/15/2014
08/31/2014
TBA
$26,300

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, transportation and accommodation during the week-long academic field trip, peer language tutors, Chinese Language Clinic, guest lectures, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$22,185
Housing ***
$3,500
Insurance
$102
Visa Fees
$213

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students

*** includes breakfast and dinner during the week and most weekends for homestay students

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$2,400
International Airfare **
$1,450
Local Transportation ***
$400
Books & Supplies ****
$100
Personal expenses
$4,200
Expenses during break *****
$900

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in residence halls; students placed in homestays should budget $550 for lunches

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

*** students enrolled in internships should budget $500

**** language books and area studies readers are free

***** academic year students are responsible for meals during the semester break

More Information
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Eligibility
2.75 Overall GPA

Eligibility

  • Overall GPA 2.75
  • There is no language prerequisite for this program
  • This study abroad program is not designed for native Chinese speakers. Students who are citizens of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan ROC, Hong Kong SAR, or Macau should consider the CIEE Business, Language and Culture or China in a Global Context programs in Shanghai instead.
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Recommended Credit

Recommended Credit

Total recommended credit for the semester is 15 semester/22.5 quarter hours, and for the academic year is 30 semester/45 quarter hours. Students with written approval from their home school advisor and the Center Director may take up to an 18 semester/27 quarter hours.

Required Chinese language courses meet for a total of 90 contact hours per course, with a recommended credit of 6 semester/9 quarter hours.

Elective courses in English and Chinese meet for 45 contact hours, with a recommended credit of 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

The Organizational Internship meets 45 contact hours, with a recommended credit of 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

Directed Independent Research requires 135 hours of research, with a recommended credit of 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

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Program Requirements

Program Requirements

A full course load is three courses. Students enroll in two consecutive accelerated language courses, and one elective course taught in Chinese or English.

Course Load Examples for Semester Students:

Chinese—Accelerated Beginning I: 6 credits
Chinese—Accelerated Beginning II: 6 credits
Modern Chinese History: 3 credits
Total: 15 credits

Chinese—Accelerated Intermediate I: 6 credits
Chinese—Accelerated Intermediate II: 6 credits
Organizational Internship: 3 credits
Total: 15 credits

Chinese—Accelerated Advanced I: 6 credits
Chinese—Accelerated Advanced II: 6 credits
Business Chinese: 3 credits
Total: 15 credits

CIEE reserves the right to place participants in the language course for which the student is best prepared based on the results of language proficiency exams administered during the orientation period.

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About the City

About The City

Shanghai is known for its long history of foreign influence, fashion, and economic prowess, and aims to become a global financial and shipping hub by the year 2020. With a population of 23 million people, Shanghai has seen massive development over the last two decades and the new financial district of Pudong is home to some of the tallest skyscrapers in the world. Shanghai’s urban centers are conveniently connected by elevated light rails, the world’s first commercial high-speed Maglev train, and the fastest-growing rapid transit systems in the world.

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Meet The Staff

Meet The Staff

Staff Image

Steve Chao

Center Director

Dr. Steve Chao is the Center Director of the CIEE Study Center in Shanghai. He earned his Doctor of Education from Saint Louis University, M.B.A. from Lindenwood University, and B.A. from Columbia College. Dr. Chao has extensive experience in the field of international education working as an adjunct faculty and program administrator since 1985. Before joining CIEE, he was Director of International Programs at Worcester State University in Massachusetts, where he led university international initiatives, study abroad, and international student services for six years. Prior to that he directed the International Affairs Center at Indiana State University and taught modern Chinese history. Born in Taiwan, he began his career in international education at Columbia College, where he was Director of International Programs for nine years. Dr. Chao has also taught courses on U.S. higher education as a Visiting Fellow at Tongji University in Shanghai and served as Chair of the Department of International Trade at Tainan University of Technology, a leading women’s higher education institution in Taiwan. He has served as a research advisor to the Shanghai Municipal Education Commission 211 Project and to the Ministry of Education in Taiwan on educational reform and curriculum. He has worked for CIEE since fall, 2010.

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Foreign students in Shanghai are amazed by the breathtaking and profound changes taking place as the city aims to become a global financial and shipping center by 2020. Already a powerhouse for international business, Shanghai will undoubtedly become a hub of the global economy in the 21st century. Students striving to become global citizens and seeking the opportunity to engage in the international business world after graduation deserve this once for a lifetime opportunity. Come join us to witness the dramatic transformation of China, now the second largest economy in the world.

—Steve Chao, Center Director

Staff Image

Ma Jia

Chinese Language Coordinator

Ms. Jia Ma holds an M.A. from the Department of Chinese Language and Literature at East China Normal University. Originally from Yangzhou, Jiangsu Province, she worked at Willamette University as a Language Assistant before joining CIEE in fall, 2011 as a Chinese Language Coordinator.

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Staff Image

Liao Jianling

Chinese Language Director

Dr. Jianling Liao is the Chinese Language Director in charge of all Chinese language courses at the CIEE Study Center in Shanghai. Originally from Jiangxi Province, Dr. Liao completed her Ph.D. in the area of Second Language Acquisition from the University of Iowa. While studying abroad in the U.S. at the University of Iowa, she received an M.A. in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language and an M.A. in Instructional Design and Technology. In addition, she holds a third M.A. in Chinese Linguistics from Wuhan University. Her research interests include computer-assisted language learning and language pedagogy in study abroad contexts. Prior to joining CIEE, Dr. Liao taught for five summers at the Middlebury College Summer Chinese School. Dr. Liao is the 2011 recipient of the Emma Marie Birkmaier Award for Doctoral Dissertation Research in Foreign Language Education bestowed by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) and The Modern Language Journal (MLJ) “to recognize an author of doctoral dissertation research in foreign language education that contributes significantly to the advancement of the profession.” She has worked for CIEE since summer, 2006.

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Staff Image

Xie Ping

Chinese Language Curriculum Manager

Ms. Ping Xie is the Chinese Language Curriculum Manager. Originally from Hubei Province, she holds an M.A. from East China Normal University in Teaching Chinese as a Second Language. She has taught for CIEE since summer, 2007.

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Where You'll Study

Where You'll Study

Established in 1951, East China Normal University (ECNU) is one of China’s key institutions of higher learning and the first to specialize in teacher education. ECNU is nationally known for its Chinese language and literature program, and the university enrolls more than 26,000 fulltime students, including 3,700 international students, at its two campuses. The CIEE Study Center is located along the bank of the Liwa River on its downtown Putuo campus, known as the “Garden University” for its beautiful grounds.

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Housing & Meals

Housing & Meals

This study abroad program fosters a Chinese language-only environment. In order to support students to maximize Chinese language proficiency gains, all participants on this program live with Chinese host families or Chinese roommates. Participants select one of two housing options prior to arrival.

Campus Residence Hall with Chinese Roommate—
The Campus Residence Hall is a five-story facility located on the ECNU campus that has a common lobby with 24-hour security and laundry facilities. There is a student computer room and study lounge on every other floor, as well as a kitchen and bathrooms on each floor. The residence hall is a 10-minute walk from the CIEE Study Center, and is within walking distance to a light rail and other public transportation. Students are paired with a Chinese student from ECNU. The Chinese roommates are required to speak only Chinese, so this option is recommended for students who wish to live in a more intensive Chinese language environment while remaining nearby other program participants. Meals are not included in this housing option and are the responsibility of the student. Meals are available in the campus cafeterias at a moderate price.

Chinese Host Families—
Chinese host families are located 15 - 45 minutes of campus by foot or public transportation. Students have their own room in the host family apartment and share the living room, kitchen, and bathroom. Students are invited to most family meals, but should budget for their own lunches, some weekend meals, and most meals during group field trips and individual travel. Chinese family members speak Chinese only. This option is highly recommended for students who want to live in an entirely Chinese language environment and make rapid progress in Chinese language.

The CIEE Shanghai staff strive to match each student based on his or her first preference, not only in terms of their personal lifestyle preferences but also academic, cultural and personal goals.

Housing between fall and spring semesters is included in the academic-year fee. Academic-year participants living with host families may be required to live in a dormitory on campus between semesters.

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Orientations

Orientations

You'll begin your study abroad experience in Shanghai even before leaving home by participating in a CIEE online pre-departure orientation. Meeting with students online, the resident director shares information about the program and site, highlighting issues that alumni have said are important, and giving you time to ask questions. The online orientation allows you to connect with others in the group, reflect on what you want to get out of the program, and learn what others in the group would like to accomplish. CIEE’s aim for the pre-departure orientation is simple—to help you understand more about the program, and identify your objectives so that you arrive well-informed and return home having made significant progress towards your goals.

study abroad in China

A mandatory weeklong orientation session, conducted in Shanghai at the beginning of the program, introduces you to the country, culture, and academic program, as well as provides necessary logistical information about adapting to life in Shanghai. You will also take your language placement exams at this time to determine your appropriate Chinese language level. Required and optional workshops and local excursions are led by CIEE staff. You'll also meet individually with the center director and Chinese language director, as appropriate, to finalize course registration and preview assigned materials for your required courses. Ongoing support is provided by CIEE staff on an individual and group basis throughout the program, including required monthly program meetings.

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Internet

Internet

You are encouraged to bring a wireless-enabled laptop. Rooms in the campus residence hall are equipped with broadband ADSL wireless Internet access. Host family homes also have wireless or cable Internet access. The CIEE Study Center has wireless access and you will also be able to access the ECNU campus wireless network. A limited number of computers are available for use at no charge in the CIEE student library or at nearby Internet cafés for a low hourly fee.

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Culture

Culture

Cultural Activities and Field Trips

A variety of field trips complement classroom work, including visits to local Chinese companies and factories, government agencies, museums, art exhibitions, and plays. Other group cultural activities include an acrobatics show, river cruise along the Bund, a Chinese and CIEE student talent show, international student sporting events, and group meals with Chinese roommates and families. A number of optional, extracurricular classes, including Chinese cooking, calligraphy, martial arts, music, and mahjong are offered at no additional cost to you. Additional cocurricular activities specially designed for students on the Accelerated Chinese Language program are conducted in Chinese.

The study abroad program will expose you to locations outside of Shanghai. You'll take a day trip to nearby traditional “water towns” like Wuzhen and Tongli, with their narrow cobbled lanes, stone bridges, and canals, and on an overnight trip to historic cities like Suzhou and Hangzhou. In Chinese there is a proverb, “As above there is Heaven, so on earth there are the two beautiful cities of Suzhou and Hangzhou.” Suzhou has a rich history of over 2,500 years and is dubbed “Venice of the East” for the many canals of its old town. Less than 30 minutes away from Shanghai by high-speed train, Suzhou is famed for its classical gardens and silk industry. When Marco Polo visited Hangzhou in the 13th century, then the southern terminus of the Grand Canal, he described the city as “beyond dispute the finest and the noblest in the world.” Today Hangzhou, less than an hour away from Shanghai by high-speed train, is the capital of Zhejiang Province and is renowned for the natural beauty of its mountains and the West Lake, and is also known for its textile and hi-tech industries.

The cost of all day trips, overnight trips, and weekend and weeklong field trips are included in the study abroad program fee. All field trips are facilitated by fulltime CIEE staff and language instructors.

Weekend Field Trip

The weekend fieldtrip is typically three days and two nights and provides students opportunity to learn about local culture and traditions in a different part of China. Previous destinations have included but are not limited to the following:

Beijing

As the capital of world’s most populous nation, and the imperial capital of the last three dynasties, Beijing is at the center of much that happens in China. It is a city of over 22 million people and is home to some of the nation’s most well-known and culturally important sites such as the Great Wall, Forbidden City, Temple of Heaven and Summer Palace. In addition to being the political and cultural center of China, Beijing is known as the birthplace of Chinese cinema and modern art.

Nanjing

Meaning “Southern Capital,” Nanjing was the seat of power for Imperial China in the Six Dynasties and is remembered as one of the Four Great Ancient Capitals of China. Today Nanjing is regarded as one of China’s most important commercial centers, as well as one of the safest and most livable cities in China. Just an hour from Shanghai by high-speed train, Nanjing prides itself on maintaining the atmosphere of a traditional Chinese city, with its classical temples and 600-year-old city wall, while being a base for hundreds of multinational corporations and many Fortune 500 companies. The city is also home to the Ming Mausoleum, Presidential Palace of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom, and the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall, built to commemorate those who died during the Japanese invasion of the city in 1937 when it was the capital of the Republic of China.

Weeklong Excursion

Each weeklong field trip is typically eight nights and nine days. Every semester the CIEE Study Center offers three to four concurrent weeklong fieldtrips that are designed to go beyond tourism. Each trip explores a specific theme related to the learning goals of each program. You'll be expected to complete pre-departure readings and assignments, attend classroom lectures, films, and discussions before and during the trip. You may select any trip that best meets your individual educational learning goals. Since enrollment is limited to maintain quality and facilitate cultural immersion, participation on any particular field trip is not guaranteed and is based on total program enrolment and other factors. Students on this program have priority enrolment on the first of the four options listed below:

Ancient Trade Routes

Silk Road—Fall

A historical network of interlinking caravan routes stretching for some 4,000 miles across the Eurasian landmass from China to the Mediterranean, the ancient Silk Road was established some 2,200 years ago and continued to operate as a vital trade route between China and the Western world until the end of the 14th century. Arguably the world’s most important pre-modern trade route, the Silk Road was a significant factor in the development of Chinese civilization, serving as a highway not just for exchanging merchandise but ideas—religious, cultural, and artistic. In the fall semester, students travel to the beginning of the northern route in Xi’an, modern capital of Shaanxi province and ancient capital of China at the height of Silk Road trade, and then onto Dunhuang in Gansu province. Known as “City of Sands” for its surrounding dunes, this oasis in the desert is strategically located at the junction of the northern and southern trade routes, and the nearby Mogao Caves contain a treasure trove of Buddhist sculptures, murals, and manuscripts. This field trip is most suitable for humanities and social science students majoring in Chinese language and culture, literature, history, religion, anthropology, and geography. Students on the Accelerated Chinese Language program have priority enrollment.

Tea and Horse Road—Spring

This ancient network of mountain paths connected the tea growing regions of southwestern China to Burma and India overland by mule caravan through the mountains and valleys of Yunnan and Sichuan provinces and Tibet. Along the world’s highest trade route, Chinese tea bricks and salt were exchanged for Tibetan horses used by China’s military to fight warring nomadic groups along its northern border. In spring semester, students travel to Lijiang, with its ancient town of cobbled lanes and waterways, which later served as an important trading and supply route between India and China during World War II, and today is home to the Naxi ethnic group, who are renowned for the pictographic script of their shamans. Finally, students will visit Shangri-La, the seat of a Tibetan autonomous prefecture in northern Yunnan province near the border of Tibet. This field trip is most suitable for humanities and social science students majoring in Chinese language and culture, literature, history, religion, anthropology and geography. Students on the Accelerated Chinese Language program have priority enrollment.

Hong Kong

Hong Kong is one of the world's leading international financial centers, with one of the highest per capita income in the world, and it is one of the most densely populated places on the planet. A major capitalist service economy known for its low taxation and free trade, sovereignty over Hong Kong was transferred from the United Kingdom to China in 1997, ending 156 years of British colonial rule. Now one of China’s two Special Administrative Regions, Hong Kong retains different political and economic systems from mainland China and is characterized by a culturally diverse and international population. This field trip includes visits to companies and lectures on business development and industry in Hong Kong, as well as a city tour, night cruise in Victoria Harbor, and a local Daoist temple known for its fortune telling. This field trip is most appropriate for students majoring in international business, finance and economics. Students on the Business, Language, and Culture program have priority enrollment.

Taiwan

It is often said that some of the most traditional forms of Chinese culture, religious practices, intellectual and cultural values, and creative arts are best preserved on the island of Taiwan. At the same time, Taiwan maintains a thriving civil society, with its democratic political system, free press, uncensored Internet, and capitalist economy. Its capital, Taipei, is an international city with some six million residents, and its popular music, film, and television are widely influential throughout East Asia. Formerly known as Formosa, Taiwan was once a Dutch colony in the 17th century, and was subsequently ruled by the Qing dynasty for the next 200 years until sovereignty was ceded to the Japanese in the late 19th century, who ruled the island until the end of World War II. As such Taiwanese culture is sometimes described as combining Chinese and Japanese cultures with traditional Confucian beliefs and contemporary Western values. Taiwanese companies still manufacture a large portion of the world's consumer electronics, though mostly now from their factories in mainland China. This field trip includes lectures by university professors, representatives from both the Nationalist Party (KMT) and its opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), and government officials on such topics as political economy, cross-strait relations, regional security, and national identity. In Taipei, students will visit the National Palace Museum, which contains one of the greatest collections of Chinese art in the world, and Taipei 101, the tallest building in the world until 2010. They will tour important cultural and scenic sites around the island, visiting aboriginal communities in Taidung and Hualien, Taiwan’s major port city of Kaoshiung, and the night markets of Keelung. This field trip is most appropriate for social science students majoring in international affairs, political science, and economics. Students on the China in a Global Context program have priority enrollment.

Community Engagement in Rural China

study abroad in China

Study abroad students selecting this field trip will have the unique opportunity to travel to a rural region of interior China, such as a Hani ethnic minority village in Yunnan province, or participate in a building project with Habitat for Humanity or an educational activity with another not-for-profit organization designed to help improve conditions in impoverished rural communities. This field trip will take students far off the tourist track, and may include extended stays in a village, manual labor, and short hikes, and is designed to facilitate meaningful people-to-people exchange and allow students to apply theory to practice and to give back to the communities in which they learn. This field trip is most appropriate for students interested in service learning, grassroots development, and corporate social responsibility. Students taking coursework related to service learning or who need to fulfill a service learning requirement for their home institution have priority enrollment.

Immersion

One-On-One Classes

In addition to daily classes, you'll meet for one-on-one class with your language instructor for 30 minutes four times a week.

Peer Language Tutors

You will be paired with ECNU students for structured, one-on-one Chinese language tutorials for a minimum of one hour, twice a week. Additional tutorial hours are available upon request. Tutors are undergraduate or graduate students who major in teaching Chinese as a foreign language.

Chinese Language Clinic

Full-time Chinese language instructors assist students with special or unique problems in language study by arranging an optional language clinic that meets for one and half hours, four evenings a week, Monday through Wednesday and on Sunday in the campus residence hall.

Target Language Activities

CIEE head teachers organize group meals and other activities for the students, their language teachers, peer tutors, and resident staff to encourage students to utilize their Chinese in an informal setting. Students attending the optional activities are expected to speak only Chinese.

CIEE Community Language Commitment

You are asked to take part in the CIEE Community Language Commitment, which is a graded component of the Chinese language courses that begins on the first day of classes. During orientation you'll sign an agreement specifying when and in what contexts speaking Chinese is required, including inside the Chinese language classroom building. You are encouraged to speak in Chinese with CIEE staff, host families, and Chinese roommates whenever possible. As you gain proficiency in Chinese, resident staff and language instructors encourage you to use your language skills in everyday settings. This fosters a learning community that encourages regular use of the Chinese language for daily communication and facilitates language proficiency gains.

CIEE Chinese Language Advisory Committee

The CIEE Chinese Language Advisory Committee (CCLAC) is comprised of specialists in the field of teaching Chinese as a second language and serves to promote the highest standards of education at the CIEE Study Centers in Greater China. Specifically, the committee advises CIEE administrators and language instructors on curriculum issues such as learning goals and objectives, instructional innovations, assessment of proficiency gains, program evaluation, and course articulation.

Language of Instruction

English
Mandarin Chinese

Faculty

All Chinese language courses are taught by the CIEE language director, full-time CIEE faculty, and graduate students from the East China Normal University College of International Chinese Studies. The Chinese language elective courses are taught by full-time faculty from the East China Normal University. The elective courses are taught by local and international faculty from East China Normal University, Fudan University, Jiaotong University, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, and other prestigious Chinese academic and government institutions, as well as the private business sector in Shanghai.

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Academics

Academics

CIEE has been operating study abroad programs in Shanghai since 1981. Established in 1998, the CIEE Study Center in Shanghai has been hosted by East China Normal University since 2001. The Accelerated Chinese Language program began in spring, 2012, and is designed to provide participants with a strong foundation in Chinese language and help them gain a deeper understanding of China today through intensive Chinese language coursework and cultural immersion, complimented by a wide selection of area studies courses in various disciplines from which to choose.

There is no language prerequisite for this program. The program is open to all levels of language students, from novice students with no previous experience in the language to those with superior level Chinese language proficiency. All students take two accelerated language courses that focus on rapid language acquisition and are designed to move students ahead at least two Chinese language levels in all four Chinese language skills. All students may take up to one elective in English, and students with four or more semesters of previous college level Mandarin Chinese may choose to take a Chinese language elective or area studies course taught in Chinese instead.

Study abroad internships for credit, and opportunities for service learning and community volunteer activities integrate academic learning with practical experience. Extracurricular activities are coordinated by CIEE staff and may include Chinese students and host families to advance understanding of local society and culture.

Academic Culture

Accelerated language courses are very intensive and highly demanding. Students attend required accelerated Chinese language classes Monday through Thursday, from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Language classes are small, with an average of five students, so active participation is very important. Language classes are typically co-taught by head language instructors who introduce new content, and assistant language instructors who focus on accuracy and consistency of pronunciation through daily drills and other activities. In addition students meet weekly with their instructor in one-on-one classes, and with their peer tutors in structured tutorials for a minimum of four hours per week total—more tutorial hours can be arranged upon request.

English language elective courses take place once per week for three hours in the afternoon. Class size ranges from five to 20 students. Chinese language electives meet twice a week for two hours. The average class size is four students. Course related field trips are scheduled on Fridays, and occasionally weekends.

The semester is 15 weeks long including a one week orientation, 12 weeks of instruction, a one week group field trip, a one week program break for independent travel, and, typically, one national holiday.

Nature of Classes

All Chinese language courses and area studies electives are managed by CIEE and specially designed for CIEE study abroad students only. Some area studies courses may include a limited number of ECNU students in order to build more opportunities for cross-cultural and academic exchange between CIEE and host university students.

Grading System

In electives courses, students are generally graded on the basis of exams, homework, participation, and attendance, much like they are in the U.S. Depending on the course, exams, quizzes, research papers, and individual and group oral presentations or projects may be assigned. In the language courses, assessment is based on daily homework and quizzes, written and oral unit tests, and written and oral mid-term and final exams. The following letter grades are assigned: A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, D, and F.

Internship

Study abroad students participating in the Organizational Internship course will be assigned to an internship project with a company in Shanghai. The internship sponsors, which vary each term depending on participating organizations and available positions, may include local Chinese companies and multinational companies, as well as international small and medium sized enterprises and nonprofit organizations. Course curriculum includes class introduction, placement interview, coached work, and final presentation to earn three academic credits. See the courses section for more detail.

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Course Description

Course Description

All Courses

Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be cancelled due to insufficient enrollment.

CIEE Study Center Syllabi

To view the most recent syllabi for courses taught by CIEE at our Study Centers, visit our syllabi site.

CIEE Courses

Language Courses

Students are placed in two of the following consecutive language courses based upon results of onsite proficiency tests.

CHIN 1002 SACS Chinese—Accelerated Beginning I
CHIN 1004 SACS Chinese—Accelerated Beginning II

These accelerated courses allow students to complete first-year beginning level Chinese in just one semester. The goal of these courses is to provide an introduction to modern standard Chinese through the integration of all five skills: aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural understanding. These courses concentrate on basic daily life communications, correct oral pronunciation, the four tones, as well as the basic grammatical patterns. Textbooks: Wu Zhongwei 吴中伟, ed. Dangdai Zhongwen: keben 1-2 当代中文•课本1-2 (Contemporary Chinese: textbook, vol. 1-2). Beijing: Sinolingua Press, 2003; Wu Zhongwei, ed. Dangdai Zhongwen: lianxi ce 1-2 当代中文•练习册1-2 (Contemporary Chinese: exercise book, vol. 1-2). Beijing: Sinolingua Press, 2003; supplementary texts.

CHIN 2002 SACS Chinese—Accelerated Intermediate I
CHIN 2004 SACS Chinese—Accelerated Intermediate II
(Prerequisite: two semesters of college-level Chinese language study required)

These accelerated courses allow students to complete second-year intermediate level Chinese in just one semester. The purpose of these courses is to develop students’ Chinese language abilities in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural understanding. Students’ linguistic knowledge is reinforced and expanded through class activities with increasing sophistication. Students are required to comprehend and produce paragraph-level Chinese. Rigorous practice of spoken and written Chinese in complex communicative activities is conducted during class. Textbooks: Liu Xun 刘珣, ed. Xin shiyong Hanyu keben: keben 3 新实用汉语课本•课本3 (New practical Chinese reader: textbook, vol. 3). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2012; Liu Xun, ed. Xin shiyong Hanyu keben: zonghe lianxi ce 3 新实用汉语课本•综合练习册3 (New practical Chinese reader: workbook, vol. 3). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2011; Liu Xun, ed. Xin shiyong Hanyu keben: keben 4 (New practical Chinese reader: textbook, vol. 4). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2004; Liu, Xun, ed. Xin shiyong Hanyu keben: zonghe lianxi ce 4 (New practical Chinese reader: workbook, vol. 4). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2004; supplementary texts.

CHIN 3002 SACS Chinese–Accelerated Advanced I
CHIN 3004 SACS Chinese–Accelerated Advanced II
(Prerequisite: four semesters of college-level Chinese language study)

These accelerated courses allow students to complete third-year advanced level Chinese in just one semester. These courses emphasize understanding formal writings, as compared to the spoken language texts students learned in their second year. Students are expected to discuss and write about formal topics, such as those related to contemporary social problems in China. Textbooks: Zhuang Jiaying 庄稼婴and Zhang Zengzeng 张增增. Xin shijiao: gaoji Hanyu jiaocheng (shang, xia) 新视角:高级汉语教程(上、下). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2007; Wu Chengnian 吴成年. Du baozhi, xue Zhongwen: zhongji Hanyu baokan yuedu (xia ce) 读报纸,学中文:中级汉语报刊阅读(下册). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2004; supplementary texts.

CHIN 4003 SACS Chinese–Accelerated Advanced High I
CHIN 4004 SACS Chinese–Accelerated Advanced High II
(Prerequisite: six semesters of college-level Chinese language study)

These accelerated courses allow students to complete fourth-year advanced level in just one semester. These courses emphasize developing skills for making speeches and writing essays on complex topics. Students of this level are expected to express themselves not only fluently and accurately, but also with sophistication. Textbooks: Wu Chengnian. Du baozhi, xue Zhongwen: zhun gaoji Hanyu baokan yuedu (shang ce) 读报纸,学中文:准高级汉语报刊阅读(上册). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2006; Wu Yamin 吴雅民. Dubao zhi Zhongguo: baokan yuedu jichu (xia) 读报知中国:报刊阅读基础(下) (Learning about China from newspapers: elementary newspaper reading, vol. 2). Beijing: Beijing Language and Culture University Press, 2006; instructor developed materials.

CHIN 4902 SACS Chinese–Accelerated Superior I
CHIN 4904 SACS Chinese–Accelerated Superior II
(Prerequisite: Chinese language proficiency of advanced high or above according to ACTFL guidelines)

These courses aim to train students’ abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills at the superior level. Students at this level are expected to apply Chinese in both formal and informal settings. Students are trained to develop discourse in Chinese with coherence and cohesiveness. Students are also expected to communicate with accuracy, fluency, and sophistication. Depending on enrollment, this course may be structured to the individual needs of students. Textbook: Instructor developed materials.

Business Elective Courses—in English

These business electives are designed for students with a major or minor related to international business or economics. Students on this program must have completed three or more semesters of college-level microeconomics or macroeconomics, accounting, finance, management, or marketing to be eligible.

BUSI 3001 SBLC

Changing Nature of Business in China
This course is designed to give students a practical overview of the dynamic set of issues related to the changing nature of doing business in China. The topics for discussion cover a wide range of global economic issues. The course takes a look at the current business and economic environment facing both foreign and local organizations in China, including but not limited to, the global economic crisis, China’s new stimulus program, new value added tax policies on export and imported equipment, new labor contract law, RMB exchange, and human resources issues for employers and employees. Finally, students are asked to evaluate these key issues and explore the kind of opportunities China presents and to whom. Class format emphasizes discussions and student participation. In addition, this class is supplemented with a site visit and a guest speaker from the business community. Instructor: Charles Mo, former Vice Chairman for American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai, CFO for Nike China, and COO for Coca-Cola Shanghai

BUSI 3002 SBLC / ECON 3001 SBLC

China’s Macroeconomic Impact
Since 1978, when China initiated economic reforms and opening up policies, the Chinese economy has been one of the fastest growing economies in the world. China is now the world’s second biggest economy and second biggest exporter. This course examines the impact of China’s economic rise on the global economy over the last three decades. The course offers in-depth discussion of Chinese macroeconomic development, industrial structure, trade pattern, economic imbalance, and its impact on the rest of the world economy, particularly on Asia, the U.S., and Africa. Instructor: Dr. Yang Laike, Dean of the Department of International Trade, East China Normal University

BUSI 3006 SBLC / MGMT 3001 SBLC

Managing Sustainability in Transnational Business
This course will provide an overview on the development of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in China in comparison with North American and European countries. It aims to help students build a global perspective of CSR and sustainable business, with a strong mindset of applying practical knowledge to local issues. We will explore all essential CSR subjects, including environmental footprint, community involvement and development, fair operating practices, labor practices, and supply chain management, in a context of addressing challenges faced by transnational companies engaging various sets of stakeholders in different geographic territories. With a special emphasis on Asia and China in particular, students will study actual cases from MNCs operating in China. This course will also cover more advanced topics such as Corporate Social Innovation and CSR-related public policy in China as time permits. Instructor: Oliver Yang, Manager of Corporate Social Responsibility and Government Relations, American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai

BUSI 3007 SBLC / MKTG 3001 SBLC

Marketing Management and Methods in East Asia and Emerging Markets
Marketing is a company-wide undertaking that drives an organization’s vision, mission, and strategic planning. Marketing is about learning the overall shape of the market, deciding who the firm wants as its customers, which needs to satisfy, what products and services to create and offer, what prices to set, what communications to send and receive, what channels of distribution to use, and what partnerships to develop. Marketing deals with the whole process of entering markets, establishing sustainable and advantageous positions, and building loyal customer relationships. To achieve this, all departments must work together designing the right products, furnishing the required funds and accounting for their use, buying the right inputs, and producing quality products. At the same time, the traditional marketing mix is being transformed across many industries by new information technologies, and as a result, some of the “traditional wisdom” is being turned on its head. We will look at cutting-edge theory in modern marketing management to be applied across a spectrum of industries and institutions—both business to consumer and business to business/institution, and see how this theory is applied through recent case studies both in China and abroad. We will have a particular focus on timely issues such as CRM (Customer Relationship Marketing), the impact of information technology on all areas of business and marketing, specific issues in China, Asia, and emerging Markets, the implications and opportunities created by the global economic crisis, and effectively integrating the marketing mission into the organization across all functions with their often conflicting perspectives. Instructor: Jack Marr, Advising Director, Stern School of Business, New York University in Shanghai

East Asian Studies Elective Courses—in English

EAST 3002 SBLC / ECON 3002 SBLC

China’s Economic Reforms
(Prerequisite: previous college-level coursework in economics)
This course introduces students to both the domestic and international aspects of China’s economy. It explores the political, social, and cultural forces shaping China’s modernization and how the country’s businesses are interacting with the world marketplace. It also provides students the knowledge of processes of reforms in different economic aspects in China and strives to help them understand the macroeconomic and microeconomic characteristics of the Chinese economy. In this course, students come to understand the economic mechanism in the so called “Socialist Market Economy,” and gain a better understanding of the achievements and challenges that China is facing in its further economic reform and modernization. By the end of the semester, students are expected to analyze the Chinese economy using practical methods appropriate to China’s current economic situation. Instructor: Dr. Xu Mingqi, Deputy Director of the Institute of World Economy and Director of Department of International Finance, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences

EAST 3003 SCGC / HIST 3001 SCGC

Modern Chinese History
The first half of this course will survey, chronologically, the various eras of modern Chinese history, ranging from the late-Qing to Hu Jintao. The second half will build on the first half by focusing on the historical developments that have taken place in modern China in the areas of economic development; historical and dialectical materialism; crime and capital punishment; women, gender, and sexuality; health and environment; international relations; and non-mainstream perspectives. Many questions will be raised in class discussion, such as: “What were the major causes of the collapse of the Qing Dynasty?”, “What was the May 4th Movement and how did it shape modern Chinese?”, “What were the social and political forces that culminated in civil war?”, “What was the nature and significance of China’s nascent 20th century nationalism?”, “What was the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution and how did they shape Chinese history?”, and “Despite all the changes in China over the last century, how does the past continue to influence the present?” Instructor: Dr. Josef Gregory Mahoney, Associate Professor of Politics, East China Normal University

EAST 3004 SCGC / INRE 3001 SCGC

China’s International Relations
(Prerequisite: previous coursework in political science, international affairs, macroeconomics, or permission from the instructor)
This course offers an analysis of China’s foreign policy and China’s relations with the U.S. and other major players in international affairs—the EU, Japan, and India. It consists of three interrelated parts: a basic understanding of Chinese foreign policy; discussions of Sino-European, Sino-Japanese, and Sino-Indian relations, with the most important third party (U.S.) factor taken into account; and lastly, a focus on important issues in Sino-U.S. relations from a Chinese foreign policy perspective. Instructor: Dr. Zhang Tiejun, Associate Research Professor, School of International and Public Affairs, Shanghai Jiaotong University

EAST 3005 SCGC / SOCI 3001 SCGC

Issues in Chinese Society
China’s transition to a market economy and return to the global community have huge impacts over the lives of its people, as well as the rest of the world. While covering other fields such as anthropology, political science, gender studies, and urban studies, this course mostly employs a sociological perspective to examine issues in contemporary Chinese society. Topics examined include not only these well-known aspects of Chinese society such as guanxi and face, collectivism and family-centered culture, but also the emerging civil society, ongoing sexual revolution, and increasing social polarization that are more likely associated with the enormous social change over the past three decades. Students are asked to critically and creatively think about change and continuity in contemporary China in relation to the dynamic and complex interaction of local factors and global forces. Instructor: Dr. Wei Wei, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, East China Normal University

EAST 3006 SCGC / POLI 3001 SCGC

Political Development in Modern China
The first half of this course will survey chronologically the major eras of modern China’s political change and development, from the Late Qing to the present day. The second half will focus on different aspects of Chinese political practice and development, including exploring the relationships between nationalism, Marxism and Confucianism; elite politics and Leninism; threats to Party rule; democratic development; constitutional developments and rule of law; the “China Model;” and “decentralized authoritarianism.”

Many questions will be raised in class discussion, such as: “Who and what have been and are the central political forces in China during the modern period and how might we understand them?”, “What were the central political conflicts between the Kuomintang and the CPC?”, “What are the fundamental similarities and differences between the Maoist and post-Maoist eras?”, “What are China’s prospects for democracy and the development of the rule of law?”, and “What is the “China Model” and what is “decentralized authoritarianism,” and how are these concepts if not practices shaping China and the world today?” Instructor: Dr. Josef Gregory Mahoney, Associate Professor of Politics, East China Normal University

EAST 3201 SCGC / CINE 3201 SCGC

Chinese Film and Society
(All films are subtitled in English. All works are read in English.)
This course examines Chinese cinema from its infancy to contemporary period within a social, political, and cultural context, focusing specifically on films produced in mainland China. It aims to 1) help students gain an understanding of some of the social, political, cultural, and economic changes that have taken place in China in recent years; 2) help students cultivate a greater interest in the history and extraordinary development of Chinese cinema, and in cinemas beyond Hollywood; and 3) present mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan as a culturally interconnected region through tracking recent cross-border activities in Chinese language cinema and introducing students to new ways of thinking about national cinema and culture. While acknowledging the importance of examining Chinese cinema in the general framework of national tradition and identity, this course also emphasizes the transnational or pan-Asian nature of Chinese film productions at present. In this way, it is hoped that the course not only helps students cultivate a greater command over current trends and debates in analysis and theorization of Chinese cinema, but also help facilitate students’ understanding of Chinese cinema and culture in the context of globalization. Instructor: Dr. Sun Shaoyi, Professor of Film and Media Studies, School of Film and Television Art and Technology, Shanghai University

Elective Courses—In Chinese

CHIN 1001 SACS

Communicative Chinese
This course is designed for beginning-level Chinese learners to develop practical oral communicative skills in Chinese. The course is function-oriented. A range of practical topics such as introducing oneself, discussing daily routines, how to make acquaintances, entertaining guests, shopping, negotiating price, asking for directions, seeing a doctor, etc. will be introduced in class. Class instruction emphasizes communication, interaction, performance, and group work. Interactive classroom activities such as role-plays, interviews, group discussions, and trips outside the classroom will be used to encourage students to use Chinese in meaningful contexts. Students will complete a number of speaking tasks, including regular oral assignments, in-class oral activities, oral exams, as well as occasional real-life speaking activities during fieldtrips outside the classroom. Textbook: Instructor developed materials.

CHIN 3011 SACS

Business Chinese
(Prerequisite: four semesters of college-level Chinese language study, or heritage learners with consent of the instructor)
This course focuses on advancing students’ knowledge of modern Chinese business, including its environment, traditions, corporate culture while improving student’s ability of listening, speaking, and reading Chinese through case studies on multinationals companies in China, such as IKEA, Starbucks, and Wal-Mart. The instructor will focus on the issue of the localization of multinational companies. Students will be assigned to collect information, analyze specific cases, and make oral presentations on issues discussed in class. The course includes a fieldtrip led by the instructor to the IKEA office in Shanghai. The goal is to teach students how to use Chinese to express their opinions on business topics through practice and real cases. Textbook: Yuan Fangyuan 袁芳远. Chenggongzhidao: zhongji shangwu Hanyu anli jiaocheng 成功之道:中级商务汉语案例教程 (Business Chinese for success: real cases from real companies). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2005. Instructor: Dr. Li Qingyu, Associate Professor, College of International Chinese Studies, East China Normal University

CHIN 3012 SACS

Classical Chinese
(Prerequisite: four semesters of college-level Chinese language study, or heritage learners with consent of the instructor)
Classical Chinese has influenced many aspects of modern Mandarin Chinese. Many common words used today, both in speech and writing, derive from classical roots. As such, knowledge of classical Chinese provides important insights into sophisticated usage of the language and greatly improves students’ literary appreciation and proficiency. Textbook: Yao Meiling 姚美玲, Gudai Hanyu 古代汉语 (Classical Chinese). Shanghai: East China Normal University Press, 2010. Instructor: Dr. Yao Meiling, Professor and Associate Dean, College of International Chinese Studies, East China Normal University

EAST 4021 SACS / INRE 4021 SACS

Global Issues in China
(Prerequisite: six semesters of college-level Chinese language study, or heritage learners with consent of the instructor)
This course is designed for students placed in “Chinese—Advanced High I” and higher levels and is facilitated in Chinese, with course material provided in Chinese characters and Pinyin transliteration to facilitate reading for content. The course is designed to introduce the important role China plays in a global context and to help students understand Chinese perspectives on global issues that affect the world today. Instructor: Dr. Liu Jun, Associate Professor and Associate Dean, College of International Relations and Regional Studies, East China Normal University

Internship

INSH 3003 SHSU

Organizational Internship
The Organizational Internship course is taught in English. Company internship sponsors may include both English and Chinese language work environments, depending on available position and qualifications of the student. This course provides students with guidelines and support for participating in a real world office environment in China. The course focuses on current issues facing their managers, peers, and professional office staff, and prepares students to be better equipped to work with co-workers and supervisors when stepping into a full-time job upon graduation. Students will be assigned to an internship project with a company in Shanghai. The internship sponsors, which vary each term depending on participating organizations and available positions, may include local Chinese companies and multinational companies, as well as international small and medium sized enterprises and nonprofit organizations. Lectures cover overall policies and procedures that may be applied to any company in China, including work ethics, staff behavior, corporate values, and techniques used in the office to work smoothly and efficiently with co-workers. The instructor is the facilitator for classroom discussions and individual student guidance. The subjects covered in the class entail real issues facing the interns and their company sponsors, with an emphasis on practical approaches and methods to solve workplace issues and challenges. The course requires 15 hours with the instructor in class and five to seven hours one-on-one with the instructor or mentor, and 100-120 hours at the internship site, in addition to 25-30 hours working on academic assignments, for a total of 145-160 hours. Recommended credit for this course is 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours. Instructor: Charles Mo, former Vice Chairman for American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai, CFO for Nike China, and COO for Coca-Cola Shanghai

Independent Research

INDR 3003 SACS

Directed Independent Research(spring semester only)
(in Chinese)
(Prerequisite: placement in “China—Advanced High I” or above)

INDR 3003 SCGC

Directed Independent Research(spring semester only)
(in English)
CIEE supports qualified students who wish to pursue an academically rigorous independent research project while in Shanghai. Interested students must submit a research proposal including a clearly defined research topic, explanation of research plans, description of preparation in the planned area of study, list of resources, tentative outline of a final paper, and suggested schedule of progress. Students complete a total of 135 hours of research and meet regularly with an academic advisor to complete an academically rigorous, ethically sound, and culturally appropriate research project and final paper. Approval for participation in Directed Independent Research must be obtained from the center director and the student’s home institution prior to arrival on the program. In Shanghai, students may pursue independent research in Asian studies, business, economics, film studies, gender studies, history, international relations, literature, management, marketing, politics, religious studies, or sociology.

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