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Quick Info

Quick Info

By Term

  • Summer 2014
  • Summer 2015
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Dates:
06/15/2014 - 08/09/2014
Deadlines:
Extended to: 04/15/2014
Credit:
10-12 semester / 15-18 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

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Dates:
06/15/2015 - 08/09/2015
Deadlines:
03/15/2015
Credit:
10-12 semester / 15-18 quarter hours
Eligibility:
2.75 Overall GPA
Courses:
See descriptions below

*Please see the detailed information available below for an important note about program dates.

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Study Abroad in Beijing
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Program Overview

Program Overview

Spend this summer immersed in a dynamic language learning environment that compels you to explore beyond the classroom. In eight weeks with the Summer Intensive Chinese Language program, you’ll complete the equivalent of one year of university-level Chinese coursework at one of the country’s most prestigious universities.

Through intensive Mandarin language training, weekly sessions with Chinese peer tutors, a homestay option, and cultural excursions you won’t simply study Chinese – you’ll live it.

In Beijing you will:

  • Improve your language skills through 20 hours of intensive in-class language coursework per week, and individual and small group tutorials with Peking University graduate student tutors
  • Study the equivalent of one year university-level Chinese coursework in eight weeks while exploring Beijing and surrounding areas
  • Enrich your study by choosing from among a number of language and area study electives
  • Take in an acrobatics performance, go hiking, volunteer with disabled youth, and explore traditional sites such as the Great Wall, Tiananmen Square and Temple of Heaven
  • Volunteer in a needy organization, or participate in smaller, topic-oriented cultural activities and lectures that provide meaning to what you learn in the classroom and give you additional tools to understand your experience of living in another culture
  • Choose an extended weekend excursion outside Beijing, designed around a specific theme
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The CIEE Difference

The CIEE Difference

Homestays

Grasp the unique opportunity to live with a local Chinese family. Since Chinese family members speak Chinese only, this option is highly recommended for students who want to live in an entirely Chinese language environment and who are motivated to make rapid progress in Chinese language. Eat traditional food, immerse yourself in local custom, and form relationships that endure long after your program has ended.

Excursions and Cultural Activities

study abroad in China

Students participate in an extended weekend excursion during the summer program. CIEE will offer a few different itineraries, each going to different locations and with different trip themes and under leadership of different CIEE staff teams. You will sign up for and take part in the trip that interests you the most. Through these specialized trips, with smaller group sizes, you can experience more personal interaction, as well as learn about a topic of particular interest. Past selections have included visits to the birthplace of Confucius in Qufu, under the theme “Traditional Chinese Philosophy,” a visit to the bustling port city of Dalian themed “Urbanization and Dream of Modernity,” and a village visit and hike in the mountains of northern Shanxi province, under the theme “Environment and Rural Governance in China.”

Guided field trips are organized to cultural destinations or events in and around Beijing, and might include historic sites such as Tiananmen Square, the Great Wall, and Forbidden City. Activities may also include more contemporary events, such as plays, rock music performances, modern art exhibitions, day hikes near Beijing, and interactive volunteering activities at orphanages or institutes for autistic children.

Language Tutors

The CIEE Language Tutor program is a unique hallmark of our program and ensures that your linguistic and cultural fluency progresses throughout your stay. You will be paired with a Peking University graduate student, or CIEE staff trained in teaching Chinese as a second language, for twice weekly one-on-one Chinese language tutorials, for a total of 90 minutes per week, and small one-to-three group tutorials once weekly for 90 minutes, with more hours available upon request. These tutorials provide you with extra conversational practice in Mandarin and guidance with homework assignments.

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Dates, Deadlines & Fees

Dates, Deadlines & Fees

We want to make sure you get the most out of your experience when you study abroad with CIEE, which is why we offer the most inclusions in our fees.

  • Tuition and housing
  • Pre-departure advising and optional on-site airport meet and greet
  • Full-time program leadership and support
  • Field trips and cultural activities
  • CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits
Please note, program dates are subject to change. Please contact your CIEE Study Abroad Advisor before purchasing airfare. Click the button to view more detailed information about dates and fees as well as estimated additional costs. Please talk with your University Study Abroad Advisor about additional fees that may be charged by your home institution when participating in a program abroad.
Program
Application Due
Start Date
End Date
Costs
Summer 2014 (8 wks)
Extended to: 04/15/2014
06/15/2014
08/09/2014
$6,850

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

In addition to the items outlined below, the CIEE program fee includes an optional on-site airport meet and greet, full-time leadership and support, orientation, cultural activities, local excursions, field trips, pre-departure advising, and a CIEE iNext travel card which provides insurance and other travel benefits.
Participation Confirmation *
$300
Educational Costs **
$5,085
Housing ***
$1,150
Insurance
$102
Visa Fees
$213

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

* non-refundable

** direct cost of education charged uniformly to all students; students who elect to take the HSK Chinese Proficiency Exam Preparation Add-on will be billed a supplemental fee of $500 for intensive instruction and practice in HSK test taking (15 hours), as well as housing (off-campus, double-occupancy), exam registration fee, and transport to the exam site in Beijing. The supplemental fee will be billed approximately two weeks after the program starts.

*** four meals per week are included in the homestay option; no meals are included in the dormitory option

Estimated Additional Costs

Meals not included in program fee *
$800
International Airfare **
$2,200
Local Transportation
$150
Books & Supplies
$75
Personal expenses
$1,200

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

* for students in dormitories; students in the homestay option should budget 650 for meals not included in fees

** round-trip based on U.S. East Coast departure

More Information
Summer 2015 (8 wks)
03/15/2015
06/15/2015
08/09/2015

Program Date Notes

Program Fees

This breakdown has been prepared from the program budget for the purpose of calculating eligibility for financial aid. During the course of program operations, actual figures may vary. It should not, therefore, be used as a basis for calculation of refunds. CIEE reserves the right to adjust fees at any time.

Students required to study on CIEE programs through a School of Record will be charged a $340 administrative fee in addition to the Program Fees listed.

Estimated Additional Costs

The estimated additional costs indicated are intended to assist students and parents in budgeting for those additional living and discretionary expenses not included in the program fee. Actual expenses will vary according to student interests and spending habits.

More Information
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Eligibility
2.75 Overall GPA

Eligibility

  • Overall GPA 2.75
  • 135 hours of college-level Mandarin Chinese or its equivalent
  • 1 semester of college-level Chinese studies is recommended but not required
  • Peking University does not accept students who are citizens of the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan ROC, Hong Kong SAR, or Macau. This includes those who are permanent U.S. residents. Students of Chinese ancestry who hold U.S. and other foreign passports are welcome.
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Recommended Credit

Recommended Credit

Total recommended credit for the summer is 10-12 semester/15-18 quarter hours. Regular Chinese language instruction is 10 semester/15 quarter hours (180 contact hours). Each elective is 1 semester/1.5 quarter hours (15 contact hours).

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Program Requirements

Program Requirements

All participants are required to take “Readings in Chinese” and “Spoken Chinese,” and may also choose up to two electives, to a maximum of 12 total semester credits.

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About the City

About The City

As the capital of the world’s most populous nation, Beijing is at the center of much that happens in China. It is a city of over 22 million people adapting as China emerges as a global player. Beijing reflects China’s long and evolving history and home to some of the nation’s most well-known and culturally important sites such as the Great Wall, Forbidden City, and the Summer Palace. In addition to being the political and cultural center of China, Beijing is known as the birthplace of Chinese cinema and modern art. Beijing also has China’s largest concentration of top research institutions.

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Meet The Staff

Meet The Staff

Staff Image

Patrick Lucas

Dr. Patrick Lucas, Center Director, graduated magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Oregon, with B.A.s in computer and information science, Chinese, and linguistics. He also holds an M.A. in applied linguistics from the University of Oregon, and a Ph.D. from Minzu University in Beijing in cultural anthropology. He is the first western graduate student to obtain an advanced degree at the University. His research interests include identity, historical memory and narrative, boundaries and symbolic systems, as well as cultural survival and endangerment. First coming to China in 1985 as an undergraduate student, Dr. Lucas has been leading study abroad and international education programs out of Beijing since 1995.

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During the last 30 years, in addition to numerous deep-reaching social and political changes, China has engaged in an immense and unprecedented experiment of explosive economic transformation. This has led to significant improvement in the material lives of many millions of people, but not without substantial social and environmental costs. China is a country that has a vast and still growing population of 1.4 billion people, and in this case Western models of development simply have limited parallel or application. China is finding its own way step by step into an uncertain future. The need for sustainable practices in China is acute, and the consequences of failure to do better will not only compromise the ability of future generations to meet their own needs, but will also impact current generations living today. Of course, China is part of the world—whether as a consumer of the world’s reserve of fossil fuels and producer of carbon emissions, or as a commercial powerhouse and manufacturer of products for the world. Thus what happens in China not only impacts other regions and peoples, but China as a critical case study also teaches us about fundamental principles and issues related to sustainability, with potential application to regions across the world.

Come to learn about this important issue and the sweeping changes impacting diverse ethnicities and communities in China—come to learn about the problems and solutions, conflicts and compromises, different discourses and questions about identity, survival, and the future of a nation. Come to engage the many complex faces of contemporary China.

— Patrick Lucas, Center Director

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KuoRay Mao

KuoRay Mao, Resident Director, is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at the University of Kansas. Before joining CIEE, he worked as a visiting research scholar at the Chinese Academy of Sciences Agricultural Policy Center. He also taught globalization and sustainability at the University of Kansas, Baker University, and Lanzhou University in China. In addition, he worked as a coordinator for the international educational exchange program of Lanzhou University in 2011.

His research interests include globalization, environmental migration, sustainability in China, as well as Asian American acculturation. Since 2006, he has conducted research in Northwestern China every year including doing ethnographical research on desertification in rural Gansu for 18 months.

KuoRay was also the recipient of U.S. Fulbright Scholar Award, National Science Foundation EAPSI Grant, Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship, and the Marvin Olson Award from the American Sociological Association. He was born in Taiwan and moved to the U.S. when he was 15.

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Message from the Resident Director

This is a critical time to be interested and learning about China, and without question, to be gaining Chinese language and culture skills. Of course, with China, it seems that every day is ‘critical.’ China is a country with a vast and still growing population of 1.4 billion people, unprecedented and continuously expanding economic power and international influence, and growing military might, as well as rapidly changing perceptions among Chinese people and leaders of what China’s role and position in the world should be in the future. And China faces very real challenges—over a broad range of issues, from the environment and development models, to domestic governance and international relations. China’s success here is vital—not only in humanitarian terms for the people of China, but also for the world, for what happens in China in this era of globalization deeply impacts other peoples and regions around the globe. Without a doubt, now is truly a fascinating time to be learning about China.

Come to learn about this important issue and the sweeping changes impacting diverse ethnicities and communities in China—come to learn about the problems and solutions, conflicts and compromises, different discourses and questions about identity, survival, and the future of a nation. Come to engage the many complex faces of contemporary China.

- KuoRay Mao, Resident Director

Staff Image

Yan Jing

Yan Jing, Office Coordinator and Tutorial Coordinator, holds a B.S. in Information and Computing Sciences from the China University of Mining and Technology in Beijing, and an M.A. in Teaching Chinese to Speakers of Other Languages from Peking University, with a focus on cross-cultural communication. She was a volunteer at the Olympics and Special Olympics in Beijing in 2008. She has been working for CIEE since fall, 2011.

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Li Tao

Li Tao, Language and Culture Practicum Coordinator, holds a B.A. in Chinese Language and Literature from Jiangnan University, and an M.A. in Teaching Chinese to Speakers of Other Languages from Capital Normal University. She has been working for CIEE since spring, 2012. Before joining CIEE, she taught Chinese to children in Davao, Philippines, for one year.

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John Urban

John Urban, Student Services Coordinator, holds B.A. degrees in Chinese and International Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has been working for CIEE since fall, 2011. Before joining CIEE, he was a yearlong participant in the CIEE Intensive Chinese Language program at Peking University during his final year of college.

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Xie Yuanyuan

Xie Yuanyuan, Intensive Chinese Language Program Assistant and Homestay Coordinator, holds a B.A. in English and Literature from Bohai University, and an M.A. in Teaching Chinese as a Second Language from the College of International Education at Minzu University of China. She has been working for CIEE since spring, 2012. Before joining CIEE, she taught English language and literature to officers in the Chinese People's Liberation Army Artillery Command Academy.

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Where You'll Study

Where You'll Study

Founded in 1898, Peking University (PKU) was and still remains one of China’s most prestigious universities. Its long traditions of scholarly excellence and political activism have produced figures that have played instrumental roles in China’s post-Imperial history. The university focuses on advanced research in the natural and social sciences and its campus, which was previously an imperial garden during the Qing Dynasty, is home to the university’s 30,000 undergraduate and graduate students. The PKU campus has modern classrooms, recreational facilities and numerous cafeterias, as well as convenient access to Beijing’s mass transit system, all within short walking distance of each other.

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Housing & Meals

Housing & Meals

study abroad in China

Housing is included in the program fee. Students live either in a homestay or in the PKU foreign student complex, Zhongguanyuan Global Village, which is a five-minute walk from the South East Gate of campus. Students may not live in private accommodations outside of CIEE-arranged housing.

Zhongguanyuan Global Village

Living conditions in Zhongguanyuan Global Village are comfortable and inviting, and provide standard amenities such as bed, desk, armoire, and Internet access. Shared kitchens are available, but location varies by building. Students live in suite-style units and each student has his or her own private bedroom. Each unit shares a common living space and bathroom and depending on the layout, students will live with one to two other roommates. Roommates are either CIEE students or other International students.

Homestay

Homestays are located within 45 minutes from campus by public transportation and have two or three bedrooms. Students have their own room and share the living room, kitchen, and bathroom (in some host families, students may have their own bathroom). Students are invited to family meals typically four times during the week, but should budget for other meals, including lunch on campus and meals not eaten with host families. Chinese family members speak Chinese only. This option is highly recommended for students who want to establish relationships with Chinese people, live in an entirely Chinese language environment, and to make rapid progress in Chinese language and culture study.

Meals

Meals are not included in the program fee for students living in the dormitory and are the responsibility of the student. Students usually eat at the cafeterias or at the wide range of inexpensive restaurants in and around campus.

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Orientations

Orientations

You'll begin your study abroad experience in Beijing even before leaving home by participating in a CIEE online pre-departure orientation. Meeting with students online, the resident director shares information about the program and site, highlighting issues that alumni have said are important, and giving you time to ask questions. The online orientation allows you to connect with others in the group, reflect on what you want to get out of the program, and learn what others in the group would like to accomplish. CIEE’s aim for the pre-departure orientation is simple—to help you understand more about the program, and identify your objectives so that you arrive well-informed and return home having made significant progress towards your goals.

A mandatory orientation session conducted on site at the beginning of the program introduces students to the country, the culture, the local community and environment, and the academic program. Students take a language placement exam during this time as well. Ongoing support is provided on an individual and group basis throughout the program.

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Internet

Internet

Students can use the CIEE program office’s wireless network when at the program office to connect to the Internet via PCs with the Windows operating system, and Macintosh computers with OS X. Currently, students have wired Internet access in student dormitory rooms via the Peking University campus network. Since there is no Wi-Fi in dormitory rooms, students must connect to the Internet using an Ethernet cable. The Internet usage fee in the dormitory is included in the CIEE program fee. Each host family will have Internet access for students at no extra fee, although availability of Wi-Fi varies by family.

Wi-Fi access is available at some other locations on campus, but Internet access can be quite erratic and slow at times. Internet is also available at some restaurants or coffee shops near campus. There are a few internet cafés not too far from campus.

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Culture

Culture

Excursions and Cultural Activities

study abroad in China

Students participate in an extended weekend excursion during the summer program. CIEE will offer a few different itineraries, each going to different locations and with different trip themes and under leadership of different CIEE staff teams. You will sign up for and take part in the trip that interests you the most. Through these specialized trips, with smaller group sizes, you can experience more personal interaction, as well as learn about a topic of particular interest. Past selections have included visits to the birthplace of Confucius in Qufu, under the theme “Traditional Chinese Philosophy,” a visit to the bustling port city of Dalian themed “Urbanization and Dream of Modernity,” and a village visit and hike in the mountains of northern Shanxi province, under the theme “Environment and Rural Governance in China.”

Guided field trips are organized to cultural destinations or events in and around Beijing, and might include historic sites such as Tiananmen Square, the Great Wall, and the Lama Temple. Activities may also include more contemporary events, such as plays, rock music performances, modern art exhibitions, day hikes near Beijing, and interactive volunteering activities at orphanages or institutes for autistic children.

Expert Lecture Series

Every term, the CIEE Expert Lecture Series features scholars, experts, business people, government officials, and CIEE scholars to lecture on their area of expertise. The goal is to give students a better understanding on a wide variety of pressing issues in China and Chinese society, as well as topics designed to assist them in making sense of the culture and society around them. Some past topics have included Chinese cinema, international political economy, cross-cultural communication, sustainability in a Chinese context, Chinese cultural identity, and Nationalism in China.

Volunteering

Through the Structured Volunteering Program, CIEE works with local social or environmental organizations with limited resources or special needs to identify one or two projects where volunteer groups can positively contribute during the summer. Projects and partners are announced to students after arrival in Beijing. Interested students sign up and commit to finishing the identified projects. Projects usually require 10-25 hours of group volunteer service under CIEE teacher leadership, over 2-3 site visits, and might include projects such as hosting a weekend English camp at a blind school, creating English webpages for an environmental NGO, organizing a series of youth activities at an autism institute, or painting classrooms at a migrant school. Volunteer service does not receive academic credit and is subject to availability. Students who are potentially interested are encouraged to prepare simple resumes in advance in case they are needed for volunteer screening.

Immersion

Language Tutors

The CIEE Language Tutor program is a unique hallmark of the program and ensures that students’ linguistic and cultural fluency progresses throughout their stay. Program participants are paired with Peking University graduate students or CIEE staff trained in teaching Chinese as a second language for twice weekly one-on-one Chinese language tutorials, for a total of 90 minutes per week, and small one-to-three group tutorials once weekly for 90 minutes, with more hours available upon request. These tutorials provide students with extra conversational practice in Mandarin, and guidance with homework assignments.

Target Language Meals

To encourage students to utilize their Chinese, CIEE arranges for students to eat meals with their tutors or Chinese friends, and Chinese instructors. Students participating in the language meals are required to speak only Chinese while learning more about Chinese culture from their tutors, friends, and instructors.

Language

CIEE Community Language Commitment

On this program, students are asked to take part in the CIEE Community Language Commitment. During orientation all students sign an agreement, specifying in what contexts Chinese is required. This fosters a program environment and learning community that encourages regular use of the Chinese language for daily communication, thereby improving proficiency in the language.

HSK Chinese Proficiency Exam Preparation Add-on

The CIEE Beijing Center is offering summer students an optional one-week post-program session of intensive preparation for the HSK standardized Chinese proficiency exam (汉语水平考试) levels 5-6 (advanced). This week includes intensive instruction and practice in HSK test taking (15 hours), as well as housing, assistance registering for the exam, and transport to the exam site in Beijing. This add-on is non-credit earning; a separate nominal fee will be required to participate. Students wanting to participate in this option should also select the HSK Test Preparation elective course during the summer (see below). Students interested in this option will need to adjust travel schedules accordingly. Specific dates and details will be provided upon acceptance to the program.

CIEE Chinese Language Advisory Committee

The CIEE Chinese Language Advisory Committee (CCLAC) is comprised of specialists in the field of teaching Chinese as a second language and serves to promote the highest standards of education at the CIEE Study Centers in Greater China. Specifically, the committee advises CIEE administrators and language instructors on curriculum issues such as learning goals and objectives, instructional innovations, assessment of proficiency gains, program evaluation, and course articulation.

Certificate of Achievement

Students receive a certificate of achievement from Peking University after successfully completing the program.

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Academics

Academics

Academic Program

Established in 1980 as the CIEE flagship program in China and the first study abroad program at Peking University after the normalization of U.S.-China relations, the CIEE summer language program offers intermediate and advanced students an opportunity to improve their fluency in spoken and written Mandarin Chinese while gaining insight into life in China’s capital city. With over three decades of experience educating U.S. students in China, the CIEE Study Center in Beijing includes many notable alumni, including the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, Timothy Geithner.

Academic Culture

Students take one “Readings in Chinese” and one “Spoken Chinese” course at the appropriate level. The pace of the courses are quite fast, so all students are expected to spend at least four to five hours each afternoon and evening preparing for the next day’s class.

The “Readings in Chinese” course consists of five, two-hour Chinese classes per week. Each textbook lesson is covered in two days, and is broken up into the following five components: Mastering Vocabulary, Explanation of Readings and Grammar, Exercises, Dictation, and Correction and Feedback on Homework. The Explanation of Readings and Grammar section requires students to form three person discussion groups. These courses emphasize the study of written Chinese and are designed to advance reading and writing skills through the study of short essays and stories. Coursework includes exercises in tone drills, vocabulary, and grammatical usage. Every textbook includes 10 to 12 lessons, completed in eight weeks. In addition, students have an exam every week.

The “Spoken Chinese” course consists of five, two-hour Chinese lessons per week. Each lesson is divided into the following four components: Mastering Vocabulary, Explanation of Readings, Drills, and Dictation. The Drills section requires students to form two or three person groups to review grammar and present group dialogues to the larger class. The “Spoken Chinese” course includes two-on-one sections two afternoons each week, pairing two students with one language instructor to work individually on pronunciation and speaking fluency with each student. These courses emphasize conversational Chinese through texts, which include exercises in vocabulary, grammar, and sentence construction. The exercises are content-oriented and provide students with practical vocabulary through dialogues and pattern drills. Every textbook includes 12 lessons completed in eight weeks.

Nature of Classes

Participants take classes with other CIEE students only. Class sizes are capped at 15 students, allowing teachers to better understand the individual needs of each student and providing students with a classroom environment that facilitates active class participation.

Grading System

Grades are determined by two exams (80%), homework and quizzes (10%), and attendance and participation (10%). PKU assigns a numeric grade out of 100 and CIEE assigns U.S. letter grade equivalents.

Attendance

According to Peking University attendance guidelines, students who miss 25% of classes will not receive a final grade for that course.

Language of Instruction

English; Mandarin Chinese

Faculty

Regular Chinese language courses are taught by faculty instructors from Peking University’s School of Chinese as a Second Language. All electives are designed and taught by CIEE.

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Course Description

Course Description

All Courses

Note: This course listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract between CIEE and any applicant, student, institution, or other party. The courses, as described, may be subject to change as a result of ongoing curricular revisions, assignment of lecturers and teaching staff, and program development. Courses may be cancelled due to insufficient enrollment.

CIEE Study Center Syllabi

To view the most recent syllabi for courses taught by CIEE at our Study Centers, visit our syllabi site.

Elective Courses

EAST 3001 CBSU / SOCI 3001 CBSU
Issues in Contemporary Chinese Society

Through this brief survey of a set of issues critical to contemporary Chinese society and global sustainability, students will become acquainted with the socio-economic, political, cultural, and ecological contexts in which the Chinese state operates. Major themes of the course will touch on political economy, international relations, social stratification, civil society, and sustainable development in China. The course consists of short readings, six contact hours of classroom discussion, attendance at five expert lectures, and an activity in the vicinity of Beijing. Students will be evaluated by attendance, participation, and a short reflection paper which engages major themes of the course. Contact hours: 15. Recommended credit: 1 semester/1.5 quarter hours. Taught in English.

CHIN 3005 CBEJ
Language and Culture Practicum

This CIEE practicum supplements the language training by PKU. The practicum is designed and facilitated by the CIEE resident staff and integrates many of the activities in the co-curricular program through task-based exercises and assignments using spoken and written Chinese. Contact hours: 15. Recommended credit: 1 semester/1.5 quarter hours.

CHIN 2001 CBSU
Learning Chinese Through Drama

Students work through the script of a short play having themes tied closely to contemporary Chinese life, and conclude by performing the play for their peers. Study starts by learning the vocabulary and grammar in the script, then moves to the background and story of the play, and afterwards to memorization and recitation. The focus of this course is on improving spoken pronunciation, rhythm, and intonation through repeated goal-focused practice and correction. Contact hours: 15. Recommended credit: 1 semester/1.5 quarter hours. This course is directed toward intermediate level students; may require extra time outside of class for memorization and practice.

CHIN 3001 CBSU
HSK Test Preparation - Advanced

This course is designed to help prepare advanced level students prepare to take the Hanyu Shuiping Kaoshi (HSK; 汉语水平考试) Chinese proficiency exam, levels 5 or 6. The HSK is the official standardized Chinese proficiency test promoted by the People’s Republic of China. The course includes an introduction to the background and value of the HSK for language students, for those seeking China scholarships or degree study in China, and for future job seekers. The course focuses on the format and structure of the test, testing strategy, review of key grammar and vocabulary, practice simulated HSK test taking, and drills. Contact hours: 15. Recommended credit: 1 semester/1.5 quarter hours.
This course is directed toward advanced level students. NOTE: Students who select this elective may also choose to extend summer study in Beijing with an optional extra week of intensive HSK exam preparation, capped by taking the HSK exam at the end of the week in Beijing. This add-on week includes intensive instruction and practice in HSK test taking (15 hours), as well as housing (off-campus, double-occupancy), assistance registering for the exam, and transport to the exam site in Beijing. This add-on is non-credit earning, and requires a separate nominal fee. Students interested in this option will need to adjust travel schedules accordingly. Specific dates and details will be provided upon acceptance to the program.

Chinese Language Courses

CHIN 2011 CBSU
Readings in Chinese—Intermediate

This course is designed to allow students to complete the entire Intermediate level in one summer. The purpose of this course is to expand the students’ reading abilities beyond the everyday conversation difficulty level. By closely analyzing complex text content, the students learn to recognize important sentence patterns, words, and phrases. Through class activities, special emphasis is given to learning to use sentence patterns in a flexible and comfortable way. Other goals include improving the accuracy, fluency, and overall speaking skills. Subject matter in the text helps students to appropriately express themselves in various real-life situations. Textbook: Yang Defeng 杨德峰 and Wang Tianmiao 王添淼. Zoujin Zhongguo: Chuji Hanyu 走进中国:初级汉语 (Meeting China: elementary comprehensive Chinese). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2011.

CHIN 2012 CBSU
Readings in Chinese—High Intermediate

This course is designed to allow students to complete the entire High Intermediate level in one summer. The purpose of this course is to improve students’ overall level of reading and writing in Chinese. Class activities seek to expand students’ vocabulary and increase their knowledge of Chinese grammar. Other goals include strengthening students’ understanding of China and the Chinese people. Textbook: Liu Lixin 刘立新 and Wang Yu 王玉. Zoujin Zhongguo: Zhongji Hanyu 走进中国:中级汉语 (Meeting China: intermediate comprehensive Chinese). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2011.

CHIN 2013 CBSU
Spoken Chinese—Intermediate

This course is designed to allow students to complete the entire Intermediate level in one summer. Intended for students who are studying abroad, this course focuses on events that they are likely to encounter while studying abroad in Beijing. The course is arranged with realistic spoken conversations, and with lessons focused on satisfying the demands of study abroad students’ everyday life. Textbook: Wang Tianmiao and Yang Defeng. Zoujin Zhongguo: Chuji Hanyu Kouyu 走进中国:初级汉语口语 (Meeting China: elementary spoken Chinese). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2011.

CHIN 2014 CBSU
Spoken Chinese—High Intermediate

This course is designed to allow students to complete the entire High Intermediate level in one summer. This course continues to develop students’ abilities in spoken Chinese. Class activities seek to expand students’ vocabulary and increase knowledge of Chinese grammar. Students are expected to participate in rigorous expression exercises designed to improve their pronunciation as well as language comprehension. Other goals include strengthening students’ understanding of China and Chinese people. Textbook: Wang Yu and Liu Lixin. Zoujin Zhongguo: Zhongji Hanyu Kouyu 走进中国:中级汉语口语 (Meeting China: intermediate spoken Chinese). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2011.

CHIN 3011 CBSU
Readings in Chinese—Advanced I

This course is designed to allow students to complete the entire Advanced level in one summer. The purpose of this course is to help students progress from the intermediate level to the advanced level of Chinese. Course materials focus on solidifying and advancing the students’ grasp of grammar and vocabulary while expanding their vocabulary. Careful examination of subject matter in the text gives students the ability to read essays at a deeper level and to infer meaning. Rigorous practice of written Chinese in complex activities enables students to gain the ability to write Chinese at various levels of formality without grammar mistakes. Textbook: Liu Yuanman 刘元满 and Wang Wenlong 王文龙. Zoujin Zhongguo: Gaoji Hanyu 走进中国: 高级汉语 (Meeting China: advanced comprehensive Chinese). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2012.

CHIN 3012 CBSU
Readings in Chinese—Advanced II

This course is designed to allow students to complete the entire Advanced II level in one summer. The purpose of this course is to expand students’ vocabulary and to familiarize them with professional knowledge, grammar, and sentence structure. Through sophisticated class activities, students learn new vocabulary specific to the subject of each lesson and understand how to correctly apply it in different professional contexts. Other goals include familiarizing students with the teaching methods of Chinese professional courses, including note-taking and critical analysis skills. Textbook: Liu Yuanman and Wang Wenlong. Zoujin Zhongguo: Gaoji Hanyu (Meeting China: advanced comprehensive Chinese). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2012.

CHIN 3013 CBSU
Spoken Chinese—Advanced I

This course is designed to allow students to complete the entire Advanced level in one summer. The purpose of this course is to develop the students’ abilities to orally understand and express themselves in Chinese in a systematic and thorough way. Students are expected to discuss and analyze various topics in society and daily life. Through careful study of the textbook, students improve their understanding of Chinese society and culture and are better able to effectively establish and foster relationships with local Chinese people. Textbook: Liu Yuanman and Wang Wenlong. Zoujin Zhongguo: Gaoji Hanyu Kouyu 走进中国:高级汉语口语 (Meeting China: advanced spoken Chinese). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2012.

CHIN 3014 CBSU
Spoken Chinese—Advanced II

This course is designed to allow students to complete the entire Advanced II level in one summer. This course continues to develop students’ fluency in spoken Chinese while gradually eliminating imperfections in their pronunciation. This class strengthens students’ ability to express themselves at length by discussing more abstract concepts as well as responding to more theoretical questions. Lastly, students are able to engage in more in-depth exchanges and present their own views entirely in Chinese. This course helps students develop a better understanding of Chinese society and culture and foster their growing interest in China. Textbook: Liu Yuanman and Wang Wenlong. Zoujin Zhongguo: Gaoji Hanyu Kouyu (Meeting China: advanced spoken Chinese). Beijing: Peking University Press, 2012.

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