Schedule

Time
Event / Session
Presenters
9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
One-Day International Faculty Development Seminar
Laura Sweet, CIEE
9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Pre-Conference Workshop:
Engaging Diverse Identities to Promote Intercultural Competence
Facilitators: Kevin Morrison, Macalester College; Elsa Maxwell, Independent Consultant; BJ Titus, University of Minnesota; Jason Wang, CET Academic Programs; Tara Harvey, CIEE
8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Future Leaders Summit: Breaking Cost Barriers
Facilitator: David Wick, Santa Clara University
5:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
Open Forum: Education Abroad Directors and Managers
Timothy Lynn Elliott, Brigham Young University
5:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
Rainbow SIG Meeting
TBD
6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.
Opening Plenary
Featured Speaker: Freeman A. Hrabowski, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m.
Opening Reception
Time
Event / Session
Presenters
8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Exhibit Hall and Internet Café

Concurrent Sessions

9:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
Breaking Our Own Barriers: Becoming an Accessible Study Abroad Office

Details

Making study abroad accessible means breaking cultural, academic, and financial barriers. But what about organizational barriers we unknowingly maintain within our own offices? The types of students we're serving are rapidly changing, yet many of the policies, procedures, and office structures have not. In this session, we'll explore organizational practices and create an action plan to begin making our offices more prepared for students.

Chair: Deidre Young, Diversity Abroad

Presenters: Taylor C. Wood, The George Washington University and University of Maryland, Nicole McDermott, University of Maryland
9:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
Making Online Coursework Compelling and Using Technology as a Catalyst to Intercultural Learning

Details

Technology is a valuable tool for facilitating intercultural learning and development. In this session, we'll discuss how online courses can be used to create interest in other cultures, with specific focus on course format, content, and assessment. Presenters will address how they're using online resources to introduce intercultural concepts and the idea of studying/teaching abroad. We'll highlight challenges, successes, and limitations, and discuss continual design and evaluation processes.

Chair: Jeanette Hardy, CIEE

Presenters: Christine Anderson, University of Minnesota, Cathryn Richter, IREX, Alejandra Parra, Nova Southeastern University
9:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
Building the Foundation for Globally Engaged Citizens: The Benefits of One-Week Embedded Global Education Programs

Details

In 2011, the Marymount University Center for Global Education developed its Global Classroom Series, one-week embedded programs, to help internationalize its curriculum, provide a low cost and convenient alternative to traditional study abroad, and inspire underclassman to spend a semester abroad. Since then, hundreds of Marymount students have participated in Global Classroom Series programs all over the world. In this interactive session, panelists will share tips and a sample timeline for embedded program design, evaluate key lessons learned and best practices, review literature on the subject, and discuss some of the benefits of Marymount’s series.

Chair: Sarah LaRosa, Marymount University Center for Global Education

Presenters: Victor Betancourt, Marymount University Center for Global Education, Carin Usrey, Marymount University Center for Global Education, Student (TBD)
9:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
A Multilingual House Divided Can Stand: Building Language- and Content-Focused Programs on a Strong Foundation

Details

Study abroad organizations often operate language-pledge or language-focused study abroad programs alongside content-focused programs primarily taught in English. This can lead to difficulties with English encroaching into target-language environments, but also allows smaller programs to thrive where a single program may struggle. This session will examine some of the challenges and opportunities afforded by operating such programs side by side. A brief panel presentation will be followed by group discussion on innovations and best practices.

Chair: Daniel Riley, CET Academic Programs

Presenters: Michelangelo Van Meerten, CIEE, Courtney Kenney, University of Pennsylvania
 
10:15 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
Coffee Break and Poster Fair

Poster List

Negotiating Identity: The Impact of Study Abroad on Asian-American Identity Development by Emily Lee, Ping Doctoral Student, UCLA

Cross-Cultural as a Counter-Narrative to Study Abroad by Kelsey Anderson

Responding to Short-Term Enrollment Growth: Collaborating with Partners Abroad by Jamie Cathell, Danish Institute for Study Abroad

Enabled Abroad, Away We Go: Working with Students with Disabilities Abroad by Teneisha Ellis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Building Resources for STEM and Education Abroad: Advocacy in Action by Jennifer Fritz, Bucknell University

Transformative Learning via Self-Reflection in Study Abroad by Naomi Garcia-Kavcu, Texas State University - San Marcos

Budgeting Satisfaction? A Quantitative Study on Student Satisfaction After Program Changes Due to Budget Restraints by Jodeen Gemmel, Lehigh University

Assessing the Effect of a Study Abroad Experience in Developing Globally Competent Engineers by Camille George, University of St. Thomas

Expanding Cultural Competency: Examining the Experiences of Nurses in Study Abroad by Jason Kinnear, University of Missouri – Columbia

Improving Program Enrollment Through Online Engagement & Game Techniques by Samantha Martin, Project Travel

Intercultural Competence Development in Three Different Study Abroad Program Types by Jayme Scally, University of York

Knowing Where You Are Before You Know Where to Go by Carrie Ullmer, Azusa Pacific University

Global Neighbors – Exploring the World in University of Maryland’s Backyard by Natalie Vinski, University of Maryland, College Park

Pre-Departure: Cultural Immersion Curriculum by Sarah Wagner, University of Pittsburgh

Case Example of Curriculum Integration, China and Asia-Pacific Studies Program at Cornell University by Haiyan Wang, China and Asia-Pacific Studies Program, Cornell University

Get Multicultural Students Involved and Experienced: A Review of International Students’ Service-Learning and Community Engagement in Post-Secondary Education by Xi Yu, University of Minnesota

11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Special Presentation Featured Speaker: Allan Goodman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Institute of International Education
12:00 p.m.-1:15 p.m.
New Event: Working Lunch Sessions

Concurrent Sessions

1:30 p.m.-2:45 p.m.
Beyond the Media and Liability Barriers: Dispatches from the Modern Middle East

Details

It was far easier a century ago for citizens of Western nations to become well-acquainted with the Middle East and enhance their careers. Think of T.E. Lawrence, Gertrude Bell, and Agatha Christie! Today’s workforces are endangered by policies that keep “the Exotic Orient” distant. Ethical International Educators (EIE) must help students avoid serious harm, but in seeking to do so, are we succumbing to a public prejudice which equates "Arab" with "terrorist” and “developing world” with “unsafe"? In this session, we'll discuss ways to overcome resistance to study/scholarship in the Middle East.

Chair: Alan Yngve, Yngve Associates

Presenters: Waleed Hazbun, American University of Beirut, Lisa Rae, SIT World Learning, Janine Rentz El Tal, CIEE, Tom Rocks, Villanove University (Retired)
1:30 p.m.-2:45 p.m.
Study Abroad After Graduation: The Rise of the Global Master’s Degree

Details

Institutions outside the United States – in the United Kingdom and Israel, for example – have developed one-year master’s degree programs designed to attract American students. New global partnerships have led to joint programs that require residence in two countries. These trends and meeting the needs of students with many different career goals create new challenges for advisors. We'll describe and assess these emerging programs and discuss ways to prepare students to benefit from such cross-cultural and academic opportunities.

Chair: Jane Edwards, Yale University

Presenters: Mark Pickerill, University College, London, Nancy Kanach, Princeton University, Michael Pippenger, Columbia University
1:30 p.m.-2:45 p.m.
Attention, Intention and Intervention- The Nexus of Safety, Intercultural Communications, Diversity and Study Abroad

Details

Experience has taught these panelists that a successful study abroad experience requires a combination of "Attention, Intention, and Intervention." This session will delve into the application of these three components in preparing and supporting students of all backgrounds before and during their study abroad experiences. We'll also delve into the concepts of intercultural awareness and intentionality. Presenters will share examples of how these tools have been used for decades and guide participants in discussions on how to apply them.

Chair: Bill Bull, CIEE

Presenter: Dan Paracka, Kennesaw State University
1:30 p.m.-2:45 p.m.
Competing with Co-ops: Providing Affordable International Opportunities for Engineering Students

Details

We all want engineering, computer, and physical science students to study abroad, but there is stiff competition for their attention and time. These students are often well-paid for domestic internships and co-ops. How can we offer affordable, experiential international programs tailored to engineers’ needs? We'll explore this issue from the perspective of university study abroad and career services offices, and exchange program administrators. Study abroad advisors, administrators, and providers are invited to participate and develop an action plan to address these issues for their own students and organizations.

Chair: Catherine Donohoe, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Presenters: Angela Shaeffer, Cultural Vistas, Daniela Ascarelli, Drexel University

Concurrent Sessions

3:00 p.m.-4:15 p.m.
Breaking the Mold: Identifying and Enhancing Students’ International Experience and Employability

Details

In this session, we'll challenge the notion that study abroad is an elitist luxury. We'll focus on how it supplies students with competitive global employability. Through a series of interactive methods, study abroad professionals will reflect on the career-enhancing opportunities available in overseas programs and take away effective strategies to help students identify opportunities abroad that meet their professional goals, maximize their experience, and capitalize on new networks and critical skills that help to create an edge as employable candidates in the job market.

Chair: Shawna Hurley, Institute of International Education

Presenters: Stacey Shimizu, Illinois Wesleyan University, Melissa Buerkett-Vivian, Global Experiences, Inc.
3:00 p.m.-4:15 p.m.
Two Unlikely Characters: Can Education Abroad and Tourism Mix?

Details

Does tourism nullify the academic component of education abroad? Join a scholarly discussion on how students’ tourist behaviors can be used to enhance course content and cultural development. The session will be driven by exploratory research of a multiphase project that explores students’ academic and travel expectations and motivations as inputs into an education abroad program based on Alexander Astin’s Inputs Environment and Outputs (IEO) model and John Dewey’s concept of play and work in curriculum.

Chair: Kristin Thomas, The Pennsylvania State University

Presenter: Janelle Papay, Elon University
3:00 p.m.-4:15 p.m.
Abroad Programs: Utilizing Theory to Support and Affirm LGBTQ Student Narratives

Details

This session will discuss the significance of race and queer theories to assist LGBTQ students with their study abroad experiences. Trainings that use these theories inform program participants about how to combat marginalization. Educators have a responsibility to facilitate discussions that explore participants’ personal identities through self-examination and meaningful reflection around how their multiple identities play out within their own culture as well as unfamiliar cultural contexts. This session will highlight how to integrate dialogue about privilege, oppression, and multiple identities into predeparture and re-entry orientations.

Chair: Jacquis Watters, Loyola University Maryland

Presenter: Erin Miller, University of North Carolina School of the Arts
3:00 p.m.-4:15 p.m.
The Psychology of Scholarships: Lessening the Barriers for Students and Reviewers

Details

Finances are a massive barrier to studying abroad, yet many students don’t apply for scholarships. What are the barriers to applying? Do your scholarships encourage participation, and how does the timing of scholarship deadlines/notifications impact choices to go abroad? What can generate higher-quality essays, and how do you reduce reviewer bias? This interactive panel discussion will explore how the University of Minnesota, IFSA-Butler, and CIEE are tackling these important questions. Participants will leave with tools and resources to improve their own scholarships and review processes, and to decrease barriers to scholarships.

Chair: Amanda Fischer, University of Minnesota

Presenters: Michelle Tolan, IFSA-Butler, Thuy Doan, University of Minnesota, Jarlath McGuckin, CIEE
 
4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
Meet CIEE
7:00 p.m.-9:30 p.m.
CIEE Annual Reception at Camden Yards
Time
Event / Session
Presenters
8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Exhibit Hall and Internet Café

Concurrent Sessions

9:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
Intercultural Learning from the Inside Out: Supporting Faculty, Staff, and Student Development

Details

In this session, we'll explore research on the role of faculty and staff in supporting students’ intercultural learning, and discuss opportunities for intercultural development for education professionals, including training, coaching, and peer-learning groups. We'll share an institutional account of how intercultural training efforts have benefited staff and students. Participants will discuss how they can develop faculty and staff intercultural development programs at their own institutions to create more inclusive and effective programming.

Co-chairs: Catherine, Menyhart, CIEE, and Tara Harvey, CIEE

Presenter: Martin Humphreys, CIEE
9:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
STEM Students Abroad: Understanding their Motivations and Experiences

Details

This session will focus on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students' motivations for studying abroad and the value of their experiences. With STEM fields underrepresented in study abroad, we hope to share student stories that encourage future STEM students to take the leap. Survey data from STEM student feedback will highlight: why STEM students study abroad, types of experiences, skills gained abroad for future careers or academic pursuits, perceived barriers to studying abroad, and ways to meet those challenges. Part of the session will focus on learning more about academic advisor perspectives on STEM students studying abroad, including benefits and challenges.

Chair: Katie Saur, Indiana University

Presenters: Erica Haas-Gallo, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Christina Dinges, Susquehanna University, Jen Fritz, Bucknell University
9:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
Digital Intercultural Pedagogies: Transcending the Geographic Barrier for the Reluctant 85 Percent

Details

Although comprehensive internationalization is an increasingly important strategic goal across the United States, only 15 percent, at best, of U.S. undergraduates participate in education abroad. This prompts a frequent question of how to internationalize the "reluctant 85 percent," for whom cost, perceived danger, structured curriculum, or family demands make overseas learning almost unimaginable. This session examines case studies and research about nonmobility intercultural learning via digital means – challenging the notion that being there is the only effective way to create globalized learning. Both language-learning and cultural competence will be addressed.

Chair: Katherine Yngve, Yngve & Associates

Presenters: Paul Mihailidis, Emerson College, Alexander Hartwiger, Framingham State University, Rasha Esham, American University of Cairo
9:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
Debunking the Boy Myth: Understanding and Breaking Down Barriers in Male Participation in Education Abroad

Details

Nationally, the percentage of males who study abroad each year has hovered around 35.2 percent for decades. Briefly examining research on this underrepresentation, the session will highlight the experience of two liberal arts colleges, Gettysburg and Dickinson. These institutions have eliminated obstacles, yet males enrolled there are still studying abroad at about the national average. Participants will be asked to debunk reasons males use to justify their absence from study abroad and to write a new narrative of education abroad that embraces male participation.

Chair: Samantha Brandauer, Dickinson College

Presenter: Rebecca Bergren, Center for Global Education, Gettysburg College
 
10:15 a.m.-10:45 a.m.
Coffee Break and Poster Fair

Poster List

Negotiating Identity: The Impact of Study Abroad on Asian-American Identity Development by Emily Lee, Ping Doctoral Student, UCLA

Cross-Cultural as a Counter-Narrative to Study Abroad by Kelsey Anderson

Responding to Short-Term Enrollment Growth: Collaborating with Partners Abroad by Jamie Cathell, Danish Institute for Study Abroad

Enabled Abroad, Away We Go: Working with Students with Disabilities Abroad by Teneisha Ellis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Building Resources for STEM and Education Abroad: Advocacy in Action by Jennifer Fritz, Bucknell University

Transformative Learning via Self-Reflection in Study Abroad by Naomi Garcia-Kavcu, Texas State University - San Marcos

Budgeting Satisfaction? A Quantitative Study on Student Satisfaction After Program Changes Due to Budget Restraints by Jodeen Gemmel, Lehigh University

Assessing the Effect of a Study Abroad Experience in Developing Globally Competent Engineers by Camille George, University of St. Thomas

Expanding Cultural Competency: Examining the Experiences of Nurses in Study Abroad by Jason Kinnear, University of Missouri – Columbia

Improving Program Enrollment Through Online Engagement & Game Techniques by Samantha Martin, Project Travel

Intercultural Competence Development in Three Different Study Abroad Program Types by Jayme Scally, University of York

Knowing Where You Are Before You Know Where to Go by Carrie Ullmer, Azusa Pacific University

Global Neighbors – Exploring the World in University of Maryland’s Backyard by Natalie Vinski, University of Maryland, College Park

Pre-Departure: Cultural Immersion Curriculum by Sarah Wagner, University of Pittsburgh

Case Example of Curriculum Integration, China and Asia-Pacific Studies Program at Cornell University by Haiyan Wang, China and Asia-Pacific Studies Program, Cornell University

Get Multicultural Students Involved and Experienced: A Review of International Students’ Service-Learning and Community Engagement in Post-Secondary Education by Xi Yu, University of Minnesota

Concurrent Sessions

10:45 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Measuring Linguistic Gains in Immersion Settings: Empirical Studies from Chinese, French, and Spanish as a Second Language

Details

Study abroad provides students with a unique opportunity to develop foreign language skills alongside native speakers. Or does it? This panel will look at different assessment methods and tools used to measure student linguistic gains after a semester studying abroad in China, France, Spain, and Argentina. Special emphasis will be placed on “high-impact” practices that contribute to positive gains in language learning during study abroad experiences including homestays, direct enrollment, and community engagement.

Chair: Francisco Salgado-Robles, The City University of New York - College of Staten Island

Presenters: Dennis Wiseman, Wofford College, Jianling Liao, CIEE, Vera Cerqueiras, CIEE
10:45 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Washington Update

Details

During this always popular session, Michael McCarry will discuss current topics in Washington D.C. and the impact tothe field of study abroad.

Michael McCarry, The Alliance for International Educational and Cultural Exchange
10:45 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Increasing Study Abroad Access for All: A Community College Model

Details

Nearly half of all undergraduate students in the United States are enrolled in community colleges. These students are more likely to work full time, have limited financial resources, and be first-generation college students. This presentation will focus on increasing access to study abroad for community college students, with practical advice on setting up payment plans, scheduling, accessing foundation and scholarship funding, and other tips for helping community college students take advantage of the myriad benefits of study abroad.

Chair: Katya Neff, CIEE

Presenters: Jeff Badger, Southern Maine Community College, Nana Gyesie, Baltimore City Community College
10:45 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Data-Driven Decision Making in Addressing Study Abroad Barriers

Details

Data drives decision-making at the highest levels of institutional leadership. This session will use a case of one institution to explore how its global education center collaborates with its institutional research office to determine barriers to studying abroad and compete for campus resources. Using actual data, panelists will guide roundtable discussions on moving from anecdotal observations through data analysis to policy decisions by senior administrators. Information will be provided about how to work with data, what types of data your institutional research office can provide, and how a chief academic officer makes decisions on academic priorities and resource allocation.

Chair: Woody Pelton, Elon University

Presenters: Steven House, Elon University, Rob Springer, Elon University, Paul Geis, Elon University
 
12:15 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
Annual Luncheon
Featured Speaker: Michele Norris, NPR Host and Special Correspondent

Concurrent Sessions

2:15 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
Learn, Experience, Become, Teach: Internationalization of Teacher Education Programs

Details

This presentation will offer strategies for teacher preparation programs to internationalize curriculum through theoretical and experiential components of study abroad and integration of international perspectives in on-campus courses. The discussion will be guided using a view of knowledge as socially constructed that should, through ethical dialogue, create critical reflection and authentic practice, support the development of teachers who demonstrate intercultural competence, challenge colonial thought within the curriculum, and support true collaborations with others. Liberal arts, foundations, and pedagogical coursework will be explored and examples of student narratives about learning will be highlighted. Institutional, accreditation, and economic constraints also will be addressed.

Chair: Devin Thornburg, Adelphi University New York

Presenters: Gabrielle Malfatti, University of Missouri College of Education, Elizabeth Langran, Marymount University, Meta Van Sickle, College of Charleston
2:15 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
An Innovative Study Abroad Program: A Model for Professional Fields in Study Abroad

Details

Presenters in this session will outline how a small liberal arts college, partnering with a third-party provider, has implemented a successful semester-long study abroad program for nursing majors in Barcelona, Spain. The session will offer perspectives from the faculty, the university’s study abroad office, and the on-site provider. This program is offered as a model for how traditional study abroad programs can be adapted to serve students in other professional disciplines where the curriculum requirements are rigid, or often tied to state licensure requirements (e.g., accounting, education).

Chair: Rich Kurtzman, Barcelona Study Abroad Experience

Presenters: Victoria Folse, Illinois Wesleyan University, Stacey Shimizu, Illinois Wesleyan University
2:15 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
Shaping and Shifting Cultural Perceptions of Disability Abroad

Details

People with disabilities studying abroad can expect to encounter cultural attitudes that vary from country to country. In what ways can travelers with disabilities plan for, adjust to, and even shape attitudes? How might international exchange professionals help move attitudes toward the positive through longstanding relationships with overseas partners? This session will showcase CIEE alumni with disabilities and resident directors (RD) from recent programs with a focus on cultural differences related to disability that may impact the attitudes of the host community, exchange staff, and students with disabilities.

Chair: Ashley Holben, Mobility International USA

Presenters: CIEE Alumni (TBD), CIEE Resident Director (TBD)
2:15 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
Weaving a Web: Linking Education Abroad with Career Exploration

Details

Education abroad can serve as an effective laboratory for developing flexible analytical, collaborative, and communication skills sought by employers. As education abroad professionals, have we made broad-based skill development a key outcome for education abroad? Should career development be an important priority for every student going abroad? What are effective ways to help study abroad students integrate thinking about educational and career development trajectories? This session will start a conversation about collaborations and initiatives that engage this increasingly relevant and educationally rich sector of our work.

Chair: Andrew Law, Denison University

Presenters: Meika Smart, Johns Hopkins University, Malene Torp, Danish Institute for Study Abroad, Eleanor Lucas, Johns Hopkins University Student

Concurrent Sessions

3:45 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
Incorporating Universal Design Concepts Into Study Abroad

Details

On our increasingly diverse campuses, we strive to reach a range of students. Are we doing all we can to include students with disabilities? In this session we'll discuss the importance of actively welcoming students with disabilities into the study abroad process. Presenters will share suggestions about how to incorporate universal design concepts into programming and outreach. How do you talk about a program experience in an inclusive manner? What about working effectively with your disability services office? We'll discuss these questions and more during this interactive session and provide real solutions.

Chair: Elizabeth Standaert, University of St. Thomas

Presenters: Carol Larson, University of Pittsburgh, Lynnett Van Slyke, University of Pittsburgh
3:45 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
Local Synergies: Cinema, Politics, and Study Abroad

Details

This session presents part of Serigne Ndiaye and Adams Sie's documentary film, "Fed Up" (2014) and examines how it breaks down barriers between film director and study abroad director, and between local constituencies and students studying abroad. The film illustrates alliances and alignments among citizenry, art, and politics to stand up for change during the 2012 Senegalese elections. Through directed questions after the screening, we'll invite audience members to discuss how this film functions as a way to explore topics of local awareness for students, provide a critical discussion of documentary film, and make the director an integral part of local history.

Co-chairs: Serigne Ndiaye, CIEE, and Carina Yervasi, Swarthmore College
3:45 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
Cross-Cultural Competence through Education, Training, and Experience at the United States Naval Academy

Details

The mission of the United States Naval Academy is to graduate leaders prepared for a volatile, uncertain, chaotic, and ambiguous international environment. This workshop will be facilitated by leaders from across the institution and provides insights into curricular, cocurricular, and experiential programs for cross-cultural competence development. Attendees will learn about planning, delivering, and assessing cultural immersion programs. This presentation will include information on language study abroad, regional expertise and cultural immersion, university exchange programs, and global leader development.

Chair: Timothy Disher, United States Naval Academy

Presenters: Clementine Fujimura, United States Naval Academy, Joseph Thomas, United States Naval Academy, United States Naval Academy Student (TBD)
3:45 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
Exploring Campus Partnerships and Strategies to Reduce Barriers in Education Abroad

Details

Diversity Abroad and CIEE have developed a program that provides for learning, best-practice sharing, and innovation among professionals in the field of education abroad. The Future Leaders Summit (FLS) aims to increase access and diversity in education abroad through brainstorming and developing ways to overcome three significant barriers: cost, curriculum, and culture. During the 2013-2014 academic year, 42 participants from around the country came together for two in-depth summits to develop solutions for addressing curricular and cultural challenges in order to attract and serve students from diverse and underrepresented backgrounds. Participants have been able to implement new ideas with colleagues at their home institutions and expand diversity and inclusion efforts. This session brings together the unique experiences of these FLS participants, who will share the work they've done, discuss challenges they've faced, and share lessons learned since the summit. The session will include brainstorming more ideas for developing collaborative partnerships on campus and opportunities to address curricular solutions to education abroad programming. Participants will gain insight into what campuses are doing to address barriers to increasing diversity in education abroad. They'll also generate ideas for what they can do on their own campuses to address these challenges, and learn how to get involved in conversations and solutions with Diversity Abroad and CIEE.

Chair: Andrew Gordon, Diversity Abroad

Presenters: Sylvie Burnet-Jones, University of Colorado Boulder, Pardip Bolina, University of Michigan, Robert Bennett III, The Ohio State University
Time
Event / Session
Presenters
8:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Exhibit Hall and Internet Café
8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
CIEE Breakfast

Concurrent Sessions

10:15 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
Technological Barriers: Moving Toward Fully Accessible Websites, Application Materials, and Information Sharing

Details

This session will give education abroad professionals and diversity advocates information about accessibility to information on a website, in documents, and in application databases as it relates to federal legislation (see www.section508.gov). Presenters will discuss how a settlement between Penn State and the National Federation of the Blind affected institutional change at the university level and implementation at the unit level. Participants will discuss current practices and how they might address technological barriers for study abroad students.

Chair: Whitney Strickler, The Pennsylvania State University

Presenters: Kate Fox, The Pennsylvania State University, Christian Vinten-Johansen, The Pennsylvania State University
10:15 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
Making It Work: Increasing Participation of African-American Students in Study Abroad Programs

Details

This session provides practical lessons for supporting diverse students and offers a model for developing a population of students who have traditionally not taken advantage of international programs. Statistics compiled by the Institute for International Education and the Department of Education in 2010-11 indicate that only 4.8 percent of U.S. students studying abroad are African American, for example. In addition, just 5 percent of U.S. study abroad students study in Africa. Panelists have had practical experience in changing these statistics. The panel includes study abroad advisers who work directly with students at two schools under Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), the director of a study abroad program focusing on Africa, and a South African professor promoting Africa as a viable study abroad destination.

Chair: Deborah Sanders, Study Abroad to Africa

Presenters: Sibusiso Nkomo, University of Pretoria, Lakendra Brunston-Parker, Norfolk State University, Connie Lundy, Lincoln University
10:15 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
Who is Not Studying Abroad? An Examination of Three Institutional Perspectives on Expanding Study Abroad Opportunities

Details

To understand how to expand education abroad opportunities, we need to understand who is not going abroad. Presenters will share what they've done (or are doing) to expand participation with respect to the barriers of cost, curriculum, and culture. Participants will be invited to share best practices on how to change perception and make study abroad – academic study, work, or internships – more accessible. Case studies will include the Clemson Engineers for Developing Countries (CEDC) Haiti Initiative, an innovative student-directed program; Susquehanna University, which made study away a curricular requirement; and Medgar Evers College, the only Predominantly Black College (PBI) in the City University of New York, will explain how a one-person office has increased the numbers of underrepresented students going abroad.

Chair: Wagaye Johannes, Institute for International Education

Presenters: Scott Manning, Susquehanna University, Deborah Stengle, Medgar Evers College , Uttiyo Raychaudhuri, Clemson University

Concurrent Sessions

11:45 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Hey, I've Got an Anthropologist in My Pocket: Scholarship for the 21st Century

Details

The Pocket Anthropologist is a mobile Web application designed by Goucher College to help Goucher students across all academic disciplines systematically document their observations abroad and integrate this learning into Goucher's classrooms and curriculum. This panel will discuss opportunities for students and faculty to incorporate the Pocket Anthropologist into learning and classrooms, and present the structure and process of implementing it both at home and abroad. We'll also explore how it may facilitate intercultural development and assessment of study abroad.

Chair: Eric Singer, Goucher College

Presenters: Robbie Blinkoff, Goucher College, Jamie Mullaney, Goucher College, Kate McCleary, Washington College
11:45 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
A World Away: How One HBCU Faced Down Cost, Curriculum, and Culture and Made it to China

Details

Despite barriers of cost, curriculum, and culture, 13 Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) students spent 10 days in Shanghai, China, in summer 2013. WSSU students are of varied ages, and racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds, and many didn’t have a passport before this trip. Craig Richardson, a WSSU professor of economics, worked with CIEE’s Faculty and Custom Programs department and Steve Chao, center director for the CIEE Study Center in Shanghai, to design a program for his MBA students. We'll explore how WSSU was able to overcome barriers and give these students a life-changing experience, and how other institutions may be able to replicate its model to increase access to study abroad for traditionally underrepresented students.

Chair: Erin Santana, CIEE

Presenters: Craig Richardson, Winston-Salem State University, Steve Chao, CIEE
11:45 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Diversity Dialogue

Details

Participants will reflect on conference sessions and speakers – all devoted to the theme of breaking barriers and increasing diversity in international education – and identify key themes and actions for moving forward. We'll engage in discussions and develop action plans to ensure that conference insights result in positive change and an increased ability to support all students on international and intercultural programs.

Co-Chairs: Catherine Menyhart, CIEE, and Carol Larson, University of Pittsburgh